Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Charles E. Ziegler, who is Professor of Political Science as well as Distinguished Research Scholar at the University of Louisville. He specializes on the domestic, foreign, and security policies of Russia and Eurasia, and he recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: The Rest Against the West?" Dr.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Blaise Misztal, the director of the National Security Program at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which is a Washington-based think tank aimed at developing principled, politically viable policy solutions. Over the years, Misztal has researched a variety national security issues, including U.S.-Turkey relations, Iran and its nuclear program, cybersecurity, stabilizing fragile states, and public diplomacy in the 21st century. He has published op-eds in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The New Republic, and elsewhere.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Jose Ramos-Horta, the former president of Timor-Leste (a/k/a East Timor) in Southeast Asia. Ramos-Horta also chairs the U.N. High Level Independent Panel on U.N. Peace Operations, and he was a co-recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize for Peace. He recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "U.N. Peace Operations: Have They Really Brought the World Closer to Peace?" -- and he stopped by our KWGS to speak about this when he was here.

As noted in a 2014 article by Robert Kaplan in Forbes Magazine: "Geopolitics is the battle for space and power played out in a geographical setting. Just as there are military geopolitics, diplomatic geopolitics, and economic geopolitics, there is also energy geopolitics. For natural resources and the trade routes that bring those resources to consumers are central to the study of geography. Every international order in early modern and modern history is based on an energy resource.

In the pre-9/11 past, threats to international security could usually be attributed to this or that "dangerous" or "unstable" nation-state. Today, however, such threats are quite often attributed not to nation-states, but to "non-state actors" like Boko Haram, Al-Qaeda, or the Islamic State (IS). We're speaking about this dramatic shift in thinking -- and in action, and in policy -- with Dr. Dan Caldwell, a professor of political science at Pepperdine University’s Seaver College. Dr.

On this installment of ST, we hear from a career foreign service officer about the two largest democracies in Africa, each dealing with conflicts that will continue to have consequences for the U.S. Our guest is Ambassador John Campbell, the Ralph Bunche Senior Fellow for Africa Policy Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. (Previously, from 1975 to 2007, Ambassador Campbell served as a U.S.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Geoffrey Harris, a noted expert on European history, politics, and culture. Last night, Mr. Harris gave a private address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "The European Union: Domestic and International Challenges," and he expands on his remarks on our program today. As noted at the Tulsa Committee's website: "Mr. Harris is currently the Deputy Head of the European Parliament Liaison Office with the U.S. Congress.

As noted at Wikipedia: "Public diplomacy...broadly speaking, is the communication with foreign publics to establish a dialogue designed to inform and influence. There is no one definition of public diplomacy, and...definitions vary and continue to change over time. It is practiced through a variety of instruments and methods, ranging from personal contact and media interviews to the Internet and educational exchanges." On this installment of ST, we explore this hard-to-pin-down idea with a scholarly expert on such. Our guest is Dr.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with Gustavo Coronel, who had a 30+ year career in the petroleum industry in Venezuela, Holland, Algiers, Indonesia, most of Latin America, and the United States, while working for Royal Dutch-Shell, Phillips Petroleum, and Petroleos de Venezuela. Since 2006, he has been an independent consultant on the geopolitics of energy and Latin American public policy.

On this edition of ST, we learn about World Neighbors. This OKC-based NGO, per its website, "focuses on training and educating communities to find lasting solutions to the challenges they face -- hunger, poverty, and disease -- rather than giving them food, money, or constructing buildings. Children often walk miles just for access to clean water. World Neighbors works to ease the burden of water walks by educating communities how to install wells in their villages.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Robert W. Jordan, who is Diplomat in Residence and Adjunct Professor of Political Science in the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. Jordan served as U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 2001 to 2003, taking charge of his mission in the wake of the 9/11 attacks -- an especially critical time in U.S.-Saudi relations. Jordan spoke recently here in Tulsa, when he was guest of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with political analyst Dean Cheng, who works at The Heritage Foundation as a senior research fellow on Chinese political and security affairs. A widely respected political writer and commentator, Cheng has appeared on National Public Radio, CNN International, BBC World Service, and elsewhere, and he recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.

Where do things now stand regarding the Russia-Ukraine conflict? And how did we get here, and what might the future have in store? Such are the questions we're exploring today. On this edition of ST, we speak with William B. Taylor, Jr., the acting executive vice president at the United States Institute of Peace. From 2011 to 2013, Taylor was the Special Coordinator for Middle East Transitions in the U.S.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Brian Katulis, a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia. Katulis -- who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, and who spoke with us while he was in town -- has served as a consultant to numerous U.S. government agencies, private corporations, and non-governmental organizations on projects in more than two dozen countries, including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Egypt, and Colombia.

From the most powerful politicians in Washington, DC, to the director of "Birdman," Alejandro González Iñárritu, who accepted the Best Picture Oscar at last night's Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood, immigration reform -- and finally doing something about immigration reform -- is on the minds of many. On this edition of ST, we talk about such with Tamar Jacoby, the president and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA, which is a national federation of small business owners working to advance better immigration law.

On this installment of ST, our guest is Lisa Curtis, a Senior Research Fellow for South Asia in the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. Curtis is a widely recognized expert on America's economic, political, and security relationships with India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and other nations in South Asia, and has thus been seen as a guest commentator or news analyst on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, CBS, PBS, the BBC, and elsewhere.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Tom Garrett, an Oklahoma native who's worked at the International Republican Institute (or IRI) since 1994.

On this installment of ST, we offer a discussion of how oil, coal, and other energy sources are influencing today's international geo-politics. Our guest is James Clad, a diversely experienced foreign-affairs and oil-policy expert who consults for various energy and investment firms worldwide. Clad is a senior adviser at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) in Arlington, Virginia, as well as an advisor to IHS Jane's and Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA). From 2002 to 2010, Clad served as U.S.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Charlotte Ponticelli, the recently named Program Director for the American Committees on Foreign Relations, who was a guest of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations last night. At that event, she gave an address entitled "The Status of Women's Rights in Afghanistan." Ponticelli is an international consultant as well as an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of America. She has more than twenty years' experience working for the U.S.

On this edition of our show, we are talking about Latin America's two largest economies, those of Mexico and Brazil. Each has experienced much of the turbulence or strife that goes hand in hand, it seems, with globalization --- but each has also enjoyed many of the benefits of this ongoing, open-ended worldwide phenomenon. Our guest today on ST is an expert on such; Dr. Diana Negroponte is a nonresident senior fellow with the Latin America Initiative under the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Andrea Mazzarino, an anthropologist specializing in contemporary Russia who's currently a Fellow at the Europe and Central Asia Division of Human Rights Watch. While working with Human Rights Watch, she has researched and written various reports on human rights abuses. Last night, with the 2014 Olympic and Paralympic Games set to begin in Sochi (pictured here) in a matter of days, Dr.

"Diplo-Mapping: The Maps Diplomats Draw and Their Consequences"

Nov 15, 2013

When lines are drawn on a map --- when the borders of a given state are finally, somehow, agreed upon --- how are the people and culture connected with these lines affected, both immediately and over time? How, and why, are societies or customs changed --- or not changed --- when such lines are established?

Our guest is Barbara Slavin, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's South Asia Center who's also the Washington correspondent for Al-Monitor.com, a website devoted to news from and about the Middle East.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Pakistan, that vitally important yet on-again-off-again U.S. ally --- or is "ally" even the proper term here? --- which saw an electoral "first" recently. That is, after its historic elections over the weekend, Pakistan's first elected government served its full term and then ceded power to a new government, to be headed by prime minister-elect Nawaz Sharif and president-elect Asif Ali Zardari. Our guest is the noted South Asian expert, Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Molly Williamson, a highly experienced former Foreign Service Officer who served six U.S. Presidents over the course of a long, far-flung career, eventually achieving the rank of Career Minister. Throughout the 1990's and early 2000's, she held important positions within the U.S. Departments of Energy, Commerce, State, and Defense.

On this edition of our show, we welcome back Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. He's giving a free-to-the-public address tonight (Thursday the 28th) at 7:30pm in the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus. Haqqani (who also addressed the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations last night) currently serves as Professor of the Practice of International Relations at Boston University; he's also a Senior Fellow and the Director for South and Central Asia at the Hudson Institute.

Our guest is Richard Soudriette, who's the President of the Center for Diplomacy and Democracy, which is based in Colorado Springs. He also served as founding President of IFES, or the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, from 1988 to 2007. Under Mr. Soudriette's leadership, IFES grew into one of the premier organizations offering technical assistance around the globe in matters related to elections, civil society, rule of law, and governance. Thus he's played a key role in launching networks of elections officials in Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia.

What does it take to be a successful diplomat? How does one best "train" or prepare for this type of work? And how, if at all, does the art of diplomacy differ from how it was, say, twenty or thirty years ago? A recent change of leadership at the U.S. State Department --- in the wake of last year's deadly attack on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, which resulted in the death of Ambassador Chris Stevens as well as three other Americans --- has reminded us, once again, of the serious challenges now facing the U.S. Foreign Service.

How will U.S. relations with Afghanistan and Pakistan change once NATO forces start withdrawing from Afghanistan in 2014? It's a question (or a pair of questions) that's been widely discussed, and widely debated, of late. But what about, moreover, our relations with the so-called "stans" of Central Asia --- namely, the five republics of the former Soviet Union: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. On this installment of ST, we welcome Dr. Charles E. Ziegler, Professor of Political Science and Distinguished University Scholar at the University of Louisville.

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