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Ground is Broken for New West Side Sports Complex

Ground is broken for a new sports complex this morning on Tulsa’s west side. It will be built, north of the Jones-Riverside Airport, just east of 81st and South Elwood. The Titan Sports Complex is expected to have a $6 million annual economic impact and 50 new jobs. The complex will feature indoor and outdoor fields, basketball and volleyball courts. Construction is expected to be completed by this time next summer.
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More Sooner Quakes

Two earthquakes have rattled parts of northern Oklahoma. The U.S. Geological Survey says a 3.3 magnitude earthquake was recorded at 12:53 p.m. Monday about 17 miles west-southwest of Perry in Garfield County and a 3.0 magnitude quake was recorded in the same area two minutes later. No damage or injuries were immediately reported. Geologists say damage is not likely in earthquakes below magnitude 4.0 and that earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 to 3.0 are the smallest that can be felt by humans.
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Is Trump Flip-Flopping On Immigration? Yes Or No, It's Sure Been Confusing

Donald Trump will give a speech Wednesday outlining his immigration stance. Given the last week of news coverage, he could have some serious explaining to do.An immigration policy centered around extreme positions — mass deportation of 11 million immigrants in the country illegally, plus building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — initially helped Trump stand out in the massive Republican primary field.So it was a surprise when, last week, the Trump campaign seemed to change direction,...
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Alton Carter, an Oklahoma Book Award-winning author whose memoir, "The Boy Who Carried Bricks," was originally published in 2015. It's a painful-to-read yet ultimately uplifting autobiography that details Carter's growing up in smalltown Oklahoma. Carter will be participating in the upcoming "Chapters" event at the TCCL's Hardesty Regional Library, on September 8th at 6:30pm; this event is a fundraiser in support of adult literacy programs, and the deadline to register for it is September 1st.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Scott Stulen, the newly arrived Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Formerly, Stulen was the Curator of Audience Experiences and Performance at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA); he officially joined the staff at Philbrook earlier this week.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Nathan Pritchett, executive director of Fab Lab Tulsa. This popular nonprofit, which opened in Tulsa (near 7th and Lewis) in 2011, offers, per its website, "community access to advanced manufacturing and digital fabrication tools for learning skills, developing inventions, creating businesses, and producing personalized products. Fab Lab Tulsa is one of over 700 MIT-chartered Fab Labs in more than 70 countries and the first in the southeastern region of the United States.

How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a discussion with Jennifer Noonan, a Texas-based mother of two who is the founder of thegfcflady.com, a website for autism parents.

More StudioTulsa

The Curious Deaths Of Kremlin Critics

Two weeks from now in Surrey, England, a coroner's inquest is scheduled for a most peculiar death.Here are the facts: In November 2012, a 44-year-old man died while out jogging near his Surrey home. The man was reported to have been in robust health, and police declared that the death was not suspicious.But here are a few more facts: The jogger was a Russian banker who had fled Russia after helping expose tax fraud that implicated both the Mafia and the Russian state. Traces of a rare,...
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One of the Islamic State's top commanders and the man in charge of disseminating its propaganda was killed in Aleppo, Syria, the group's semi-official Amaq news service announced.

Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, the news service said, was "martyred while surveying the operations to repel the military campaigns against Aleppo."

The report did not list a cause of death.

When Gene Wilder was 8 years old, his mother had a heart attack — and he took it upon himself to try to cheer her up. "It was the first time I ever tried consciously to make someone else laugh," Wilder said. "And when I was successful, after peeing in her pants, she'd say, 'Oh, Jerry, now look what you've made me do.' "

A holiday celebrating a dish beloved of many West Africans, World Jollof Day, was marked last week.

Jollof is a celebration dish. You eat it at parties, naming ceremonies, weddings, funerals — you name it, you will see the familiar and comforting pot of steaming jollof rice.

But jollof is also war – of the deliciously friendly variety.

When a young African-American man dies in the city of Philadelphia, more than half the time there's one main reason why, says Scott Charles.

"It's because somebody pointed a gun at him and pulled that trigger. It's not because of cancer; it's not because of car accidents; it's not because of house fires. It's because somebody pointed a trigger," he says.

As an Egyptian-American, I had no idea how the rest of Africa felt about my country, or how Egyptians felt about being on the continent — until I saw the Twitter hashtag #IfAfricaWasASchool, which has been trending over the past week.

It made me laugh out loud. Clearly, we Egyptians are a bit snobby.

President Obama shortened the prison sentences of 111 inmates Tuesday, including 35 people who had expected to spend the rest of their lives in federal custody, authorities told NPR.

As the Islamic State loses territory and retreats, it leaves behind grim evidence of its occupation: mass graves, filled with dozens or hundreds of bodies.

The Associated Press has documented 72 such graves in Iraq and Syria — and the wire service says many more are expected to be revealed as the Islamic State continues to cede ground.

There were 40 boats — some inflatable rubber vessels and others made of wood — packed with thousands of men, women and children who had decided the sea was safer than the land.

They set out from Libya. They did not have enough fuel to reach Europe.

When you praise a dog, it's listening not just to the words you say but also how you say them.

That might not be huge news to dog owners. But now scientists have explored this phenomenon by using an imaging machine to peek inside the brains of 13 dogs as they listened to their trainer's voice.

Parker Millsap On Mountain Stage

3 hours ago

Oklahoma native Parker Millsap returns to Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va. The singer-songwriter was brought up in the Pentecostal church, an experience that provided ample inspiration for his early catalog of songs. Influenced by Steinbeck's dust-bowl narratives, Millsap's religion-laced parables, character-driven stories and relationship tales are performed with the power and conviction of the preachers he witnessed growing up.

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