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Workforce Data Breach Affects More than 430,000 in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services says more than 430,000 people in the state may have had their personal information compromised by a data breach. The agency said Wednesday that the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission and the Office of Workforce Development both use the breached website of Kansas-based American Job Link Alliance that's used to coordinate federal unemployment and workforce development programs. OMES said the breach incudes names, dates of birth and...

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Tulsa County Booking Photo

Man Bites Cop

Manuel Garcia-Perez is in the Tulsa Jail today. He was arrested overnight for biting a Tulsa Police officer. Police say the officer was trying to break up a domestic squabble at a home near Pine and Urbana. That is when Garcia-Perez chomped down on the officer. The Tulsa Cop to the proverbial “Bite Out of Crime” and arrested Garcia-Perez on an assault complaint.

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Police Identify Suspect In Deadly London Attack Near U.K. Parliament

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52. Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and two civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday. Masood was born in Kent and is believed to have been living in the West Midlands. Police say he "was not the...

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Refugees Leave The U.S. In Hopes Of Better Treatment in Canada

A wave of refugees has been heading to Canada after first living for a time in the U.S. Canadian officials say more than 2,500 people crossed the border in January and February seeking asylum. Mohammed Ahmed, a refugee from Pakistan, spent a year in New Jersey before he and his family walked across the border to Canada just north of Plattsburgh, N.Y. last month. He says he was afraid he would be detained and separated from his wife and two children. "The Trump policy, he was just deporting...

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Six Southwood- grown herbs of your choice!

StudioTulsa

This coming weekend -- on March 24th, 25th, and 26th -- Tulsa Ballet will present "Swan Lake," the classic 19th-century ballet, with music by Tchaikovsky, about a young maiden who has been trapped in the form of a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. Our guest on StudioTulsa is Marcello Angelini, the Artistic Director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about this new production. It's a piece he knows very well, having danced it scores of times as a young dancer in his native Italy and then, later, as a member of the Kiev Institute of Dance in the former Soviet Union.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of the sport of rowing -- how it works, what its health and fitness benefits are, how it has developed as a competitive sport, and so on. Our guest is Micah Hartwell, a lecturer in the Dept. of Health & Human Performance at OSU Tulsa who's also the Nutrition Services Program Director for Tulsa CARES as well as the Varsity Men's Rowing Coach for the Tulsa Youth Rowing Association. As Hartwell tells us, this is a sport that draws upon all of one's muscle groups, and that one can safely practice throughout life.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Steve Liggett back to our program. A well-known figure on the local arts scene, Liggett is an art teacher and sculptor who's also the director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa, which was established in the 1960s by Virginia Myers and others as a haven for the creation and display of contemporary art right here in T-Town.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this edition of ST, we offer a wide-ranging chat with Bill Leighty, the executive director of Smart Growth Tulsa, which was founded in April of 2014 and incorporated as a nonprofit just recently. This organization, per its website, is "committed to policies, not politics. We seek to create healthy communities that work for everyone, with strong schools and local businesses, improved mobility options and jobs that pay well....

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Congressional Healthcare Bill Response Tracker

When House Speaker Paul Ryan says he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act so that people can buy insurance that's right for them, and not something created in Washington, part of what he's saying is that he wants to get rid of so-called essential health benefits.

That's a list of 10 general categories of medical care that all insurance policies are required to cover under the Affordable Care Act.

Updated 12:20 p.m.

On the final day of the confirmation hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch, the Senate Democratic leader announced his opposition to the Supreme Court nominee.

In a speech on the Senate floor, Chuck Schumer said Gorsuch "will have to earn 60 votes for confirmation," setting up a showdown with Republican leaders who may attempt to change Senate rules.

Meals on Wheels brings food to hundreds of thousands of homebound seniors and people with disabilities. But President Trump's proposed budget has this community-based program, like many others, facing cuts.

On a hazy morning, Alan Zebker and and Vicki Kysella are organizing packages of food in the back of Zebker's SUV. They're volunteers with Meals on Wheels West in Santa Monica.

They've got their routine down.

"Alan packs the bags; I make the deliveries," Kysella says.

"When she's delivering, I pack more bags," Zebker says.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

A man in his late teens has been arrested in Israel as the "primary suspect" behind a string of phoned-in bomb threats to Jewish community centers across the U.S. and elsewhere.

The arrest was the result of an investigation by Israeli police and the FBI, a police spokesman says.

In 1921, an ad in The Seattle Times touted a brand new candy called "Aplets," a new confection made "from the finest Washington apples and honey and walnuts." A few years later, Aplets were joined by "Cotlets," a similar candy made from an apricot base. In most of the world, "Aplets & Cotlets" were based on a treat called lokum, a word derived from Arabic, but the British and Americans know it as "Turkish delight."

It's been about 10 years since Irish singer-songwriter Fionn Regan made his U.S. debut with The End Of History, a Mercury Prize-nominated collection of soft-spoken acoustic folk-pop songs in the tradition of Damien Rice and Nick Drake.

Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

3 hours ago

Here's a classic big city dilemma (sorry suburban folks): It's late at night, the weather is bad, and you're hungry. Your favorite restaurant is less than a mile away, but you don't want to leave the house, and you don't want to pay a $5 delivery fee — plus tip — for a $10 meal.

So, what do you do?

Back in the old days, you would have braved the elements — or learned to plan ahead. But those days are coming to an end, at least in Washington, D.C.

A former Russian parliamentarian named Denis Voronenkov, who fled Russia last October and has criticized President Vladimir Putin's government, was killed in Kiev on Thursday, in an apparent assassination that Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko is reportedly calling "state terrorism."

Today is the 4th and — what is scheduled to be — final day of the confirmation hearing for Judge Neil Gorsuch. Testifying about the Supreme Court nominee will be experts and outside groups. Gorsuch himself will not be taking questions, or in the hearing room.

Those expected to speak on his behalf are judges and former law clerks he has worked with, along with some law school professors and other attorneys. Witnesses called by Democrats, who have concerns about Gorsuch, include other law professors, and representatives from women's and environmental groups.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52.

Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and two civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday.

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