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Stabbing Brings Tulsa Homicide Count to Record 72

An early morning stabbing has broken the yearly homicide record in Oklahoma's second-largest city with four weeks still remaining in 2016. Tulsa police took a female suspect into custody Friday morning after an apparent dispute at an apartment complex on the city's west side. The homicide marks the 72nd of the year, surpassing the previous record set in 2009. Typically, the city of about 400,000 averages 54 to 58 homicides a year. Even though guns appear to be a unifying thread in a majority...
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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Lawmakers at Forum Reiterate Intent to Give Teachers Raises

Oklahoma lawmakers at a lunchtime forum in Jenks said teacher pay raises will be the top priority in the 2017 session when it comes to education. State Rep. Michael Rogers said legislators need to not get ahead of themselves in proposing solutions, though. "I've seen $1,000 pay raise ideas. I've seen $5,000. I've seen $10,000. And they're all great and noble ideas, but at the end of the day, you have to pay for it," Rogers said. "So, I've been calling on my legislative colleagues to not roll...
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Emergency Evacuation Notice Arrived After The Flames For Some In Tennessee

In eastern Tennessee, officials say a wildfire that tore through resort towns in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains earlier this week killed at least 13 people and destroyed nearly 1,000 structures, according to local officials and the state emergency management agency.The confirmed death toll in and around the tourist town of Gatlinburg in Sevier County has climbed steadily since the fire raced into town overnight on Monday.On Friday, search and rescue crews from state law...
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to our show Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees, which is a popular nonprofit that's been active in Tulsa since 1976. As noted at the Up With Trees website: "In the last four decades, we have planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which was established last year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to both enrich and expand the local art scene by recruiting artists from all over the nation to the Tulsa area. This fellowship, per its website, "provides an unrestricted stipend, free housing, and work-space in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to US Resident artists.... The Fellows are expected to integrate into the local arts community, such as [via] studio and collection visits.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Billy Collins back to our show. He is the winner of the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, and he'll be reading from his work at an event here in Tulsa on Saturday the 3rd at the downtown Central Library. (This event begins at 10:30am and is free to the public.) Known and loved by readers everywhere for his accessible, conversational, clearly rendered, and often witty poems, Collins has been called "the most popular poet in America" by The New York Times.

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) It's a straightforward fact, yet it's also frequently overlooked or dismissed: the great majority of premature deaths in this country can be prevented through changes in diet and lifestyle. Now comes a bestselling book that describes these changes while also explaining how such nutritional modifications can sometimes do more for us than prescription meds, other pharmaceuticals, and surgical procedures. Our guest is Dr. Michael Greger, author of "How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease." As Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in July.) On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Penn, a British writer and journalist whose books include "It's All About the Bike," a bestselling memoir of craftsmanship. Penn joins us to speak out his new book, just out from W.W. Norton, which is called "The Man Who Made Things Out of Trees." As is noted of this book at the Norton website: "Out of all the trees in the world, the ash is most closely bound up with who we are: the tree we have made the greatest and most varied use of over the course of human history.

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Time For Homeopathic Remedies To Prove That They Work?

Homeopathy has been around since the 1700s, but despite having devoted followers, there is no scientific evidence that it works. Soon, packages for homeopathic products might say just that.On Nov. 15, the Federal Trade Commission released an enforcement policy statement about labeling for over-the-counter homeopathic products. Homeopathic treatments have increasingly been marketed in drug store and supermarket aisles, alongside Food and Drug Administration-approved over-the-counter...
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One of NPR's most celebrated and admired foreign correspondents, Alan Tomlinson, died in Miami on Nov. 26 from complications related to surgery for cancer.

Tomlinson covered Central America and the Caribbean for the BBC and later NPR during the 1980s and early 1990s, when the region was wracked by civil wars and corrupt dictatorships. He was a daring but not rash reporter, whose remarkable prose placed the listener right next to him as he would describe a riot in Haiti or a bone-jarring bus ride through the highlands of Nicaragua.

In mid-November, a former professional soccer player told a British newspaper that as a child, he had been sexually abused for years by a well-respected youth coach. The player said he knew other players had experienced the same thing — and that a culture of silence kept the abusers out of the spotlight.

But he wasn't keeping the secret anymore.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

If you're curious about what people really think about some of the hottest of hot-button food controversies, the Pew Research Center has just the thing for you: a survey of attitudes toward genetic modification, organic food and the importance of eating healthfully.

The survey results are published in a 99-page report that can keep you occupied for days. But if you're pressed for time, here are some of the most interesting highlights that caught our eye.

For six years, Haitian activists have demanded that the United Nations accept responsibility for cholera in Haiti.

Yet many seemed almost shocked on Thursday by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's apology for the U.N.'s role in the outbreak. Shocked — and pleased.

In the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, tens of thousands of people have fled a brutal, Russian-backed regime offensive against rebel-held parts of the city. Many have fled deeper into the tightening siege, which started over the summer. Others have sought safety on the government-held side.

My conversation with a woman who recently fled the siege begins with her asking how I am. She's safe now, but is still afraid to give her name. She fears for her son — still fighting with the rebels — and for other male relatives who've been detained by the regime for questioning.

The Dallas County District Attorney has reached an agreement to drop assault charges against former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel, as long he as meets conditions such as attending an anger management course and a substance abuse program.

Each year, a glowing mass of clouds forms over the South Pole, high in the atmosphere, trapped between Earth and space.

From the ground they look wispy and shimmery, like a blue-white aurora borealis. From space, they look like an electric-blue gossamer haze.

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