Top Stories

File photo

Oklahoma House Approves Bill to Eliminate End of Instruction Tests

On a 95–1 vote, Oklahoma’s House passed a measure Monday to abolish end of instruction exams. Warner Democrat Jerry McPeak was the lone "no" vote. He said Republicans for years ignored Democrats’ proposals to do away with the high-stakes tests. "You guys thought up EOIs. You guys passed EOIs. You guys got EOIs, and we gave you multiple opportunities to get rid of EOIs, reduce EOIs and no. They wouldn't even get heard in committees," McPeak said. Rep. Lee Denney presented the bill to her...
Read More

Survey Shows Tulsa Progress, Priorities Changed from Three Years Ago

A new survey has 63 percent of Tulsans saying the city is heading in the right direction. That’s up more than 10 points from three years ago. Pollster Bill Shapard said citizen satisfaction is up across nearly every major metric, from quality of life to the city’s trash and recycling service. "This is a true testament to the mayor, the city manager, the city councilors and the hundreds of city employees that provide these kinds of services on a daily basis," Shapard said. "What we're seeing...
Read More

Obama Announces U.S. Will Lift Arms Embargo Against Vietnam

President Obama announced Monday that the U.S. is fully lifting a five-decades-long arms embargo against Vietnam.The embargo on lethal military equipment had been partially lifted in 2014; now it will be raised fully, the White House says. The president spoke about the decision from Hanoi, during the first day of a weeklong trip to Asia."As with all our defense partners, sales will need to still meet strict requirements, including those related to human rights," Obama said at a joint news...
Read More

StudioTulsa

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting literary biography called "The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered In the Modern World." Our guest is the author, William Egginton, who is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and a Professor of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at the Johns Hopkins University. As was noted of this compelling study in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "Egginton weaves together Cervantes's life story with his development as a writer.

In a budget year with a predicted $1.3 billion shortfall, today is a major day in the Oklahoma Legislature; it's the last day (ostensibly) during which the state legislature can consider revenue bills. So far, very few bills have passed that have narrowed the budget gap...and time, of course, is seriously running out at this point. So, what is going through the minds of state lawmakers today? We put this question to Steve Lewis, who joins us by phone from the State Capitol Building.

There are six waterways in eastern Oklahoma that are considered so environmentally and economically significant they're given special consideration and protection from the state. These so-called Scenic Rivers were profiled in a special half-hour radio doc created by StateImpact reporters Joe Wertz and Logan Layden in 2014. This doc was originally aired as a four-part radio series, and we are pleased to re-broadcast it today on StudioTulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a locally-rooted socio-economic and educational project called Growing Togther. It's a nonprofit that works to bring meaningful and lasting change to two different Tulsa neighborhoods marked by concentrated areas of poverty, Eugene Field and Kendall-Whittier. Our guest is Kirk Wester, executive director of Growing Together.

So many attractive and impressive old buildings -- in downtown Tulsa and across this state -- would still be gathering dust, housing pigeons, and contributing even less economically without the Historic Tax Credit (HTC) program. Indeed, HTC projects have injected $163 million in private investment into the City of Tulsa alone since 2000. On this edition of ST, we speak in detail about the positive economic influence that historic preservation tax credits have had (and are still having) in our city and throughout the Sooner State.

More StudioTulsa

Evolution Or Expediency? Clinton's Changing Positions Over A Long Career

In 2013, Hillary Clinton announced her support for same-sex marriage in a Web video, saying "I support it personally, and as a matter of policy and law."And with that video, Clinton ended what had at times seemed to be a tortured effort to find her stance on an issue that represents one of the largest and most rapid cultural changes in modern times.Few politicians have been in the public eye longer than Hillary Clinton. In the nearly 25 years since her husband was elected president, her...
Read More
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At the end of 2013, snowy owls started showing up far south of their usual winter range. The big white birds were reported in South Carolina, Georgia, even Florida.

Dave Brinker, an ecologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, had never seen anything like it.

"I'm giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know that you can reach them."

In one of the many experiments cited in Paul Tough's new book, Helping Children Succeed, a group of middle school students received this message on a Post-it note, attached to a paper their teachers were handing back.

The message of support and high expectations had a small positive effect on white students.

Donald Trump has knocked out all of his rivals for the Republican nomination, but you wouldn't know it by looking at his campaign schedule.

The real estate developer is setting out on his biggest campaign swing since becoming the de facto nominee – and he's still focused on primary states. New Mexico, California, Montana aren't exactly general election battlegrounds, but they're all places where Trump is going this week.

Blowing horns and chanting slogans, protesters gather outside a Caracas subway station. They plan to march to the National Electoral Council to demand that authorities hold a recall election.

But it's a sparse crowd. Shortly before the protest began, officials loyal to President Nicolás Maduro shut down subway stations in this part of the city. University student Daniel Barrios insists this was done to disrupt the march.

Mosquito control is serious business in Harris County, Texas.

The county, which includes Houston, stretches across 1,777 square miles and is the third most populous county in the U.S. The area's warm, muggy climate and snaking system of bayous provide an ideal habitat for mosquitoes — and the diseases they carry.

The county began battling mosquitoes in earnest in 1965, after an outbreak of St. Louis encephalitis. Hundreds of people contracted the virus and 32 died.

On a drizzly spring day in rural East Anglia, north of London, Will Dickinson ducks into his centuries-old farmhouse to file some paperwork.

"The wet day has driven me inside to the office — where I hate to be!" says Dickinson. His home, Cross Farm, in Hertfordshire, has been in operation since at least the year 1086, when it was listed in the Doomsday Book, a land survey of England and Wales written that year in medieval Latin.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages