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DNC Prepares for Tomorrow's Start

Police officers are posted at street corners in downtown Philadelphia as protesters prepare for a sweltering day of marches and rallies ahead of the Democratic National Convention. Several Sunday demonstrations are planned, including an anti-fracking march from City Hall to Independence Mall, near the Liberty Bell. Bernie Sanders supporters expect about 3,000 protesters will join them in a march from City Hall to a park near the convention site. Temperatures are expected to reach the upper...
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Owasso Police Looking For Missing Teen

The Owasso Police Department is using social media to find the whereabouts of a missing 15-year-old girl. The teen, named Sadye, was last seen on Thursday at her home in Owasso's Windsor Lake area near 96th Street North and 129th East Avenue. Police admit they are unsure if she is a runaway. There has been no indication of abduction. Anyone with information is asked to call Owasso Police.
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Leaked Democratic Party Emails Show Members Tried To Undercut Sanders

With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.WikiLeaks officials say the emails come from the accounts of "seven key figures in the DNC," among them Communications Director Luis Miranda (10,770 emails),...
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Should Doctors Game The Transplant Wait List To Help Their Patients?

Imagine your heart can no longer pump enough blood to your vital organs. Even minimal exercise tires you out, and you're often short of breath when lying flat. Your lungs are accumulating fluid. Your kidneys and liver are impaired.You've been hospitalized and started on an intravenous drug that improves your heart's ability to contract. It has helped, but it is not a long-term solution. You need a new heart.You're a good candidate, but there is a problem: a chronic shortage of donor hearts....
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StudioTulsa

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." That book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom.

On this edition of ST, a compelling discussion with Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation whose writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone (and who is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR). We are discussing Berman's widely acclaimed book, "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," which first appeared last summer and will be published in paperback early next month.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Amy Haimerl, a professor of journalism at Michigan State University who writes about small business and urban policy for Fortune, Reuters, The New York Times, and other outlets. She was previously the entrepreneurship editor at Crain's Detroit Business, where she covered the city's historic bankruptcy trial.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Medicalodges, a Kansas-based healthcare company that, per its website, "was launched in 1961 when its first nursing home, Golden Age Lodge, was opened in Coffeyville.... The company grew through the 1960s with the addition of eight nursing facilities. In 1969, Golden Age Lodges was renamed Medicalodges, Inc. As new care centers were built or purchased, the company expanded its products and services to include a continuum of health care.

Questions of race and ethnicity are clearly at the heart of American politics -- and American culture, and American life -- in an all-encompassing way that we as a nation haven't seen since the Sixties. On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Shelly Tochluk, author of "Witnessing Whiteness: The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It." It's a widely read book on contemporary US race relations, and one that Dr. Tochluk has spoken about -- and led workshops on -- here in Tulsa in the past.

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They're Small, But These Big-City Apartments Tout Their Communal Feel

Summertime means college graduates are on the lookout for work and housing. For those eyeing big city life the trick to paying reasonable rent might mean downsizing — really downsizing.In coastal cities, where space is scarce and demand is through the roof, there is a new housing trend developing: micro apartments.Think dorm life, but a little more grown up. Small studio apartments, kitchenettes and beds that fold into the wall to make space.It's a tight fit. Before Christina House and her...
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Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats have had quite the year since they played the 2015 Newport Folk Festival last July.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

A Brief History Of Spousal Speeches At Political Conventions

5 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This corpse flower could be just seconds away from blooming. And you can watch it live, thanks to the New York Botanical Gardens. This way, you don't have to smell its famous, disgusting odor.

Unfamiliar with this so-called "botanical phenomenon"? The giant flower, which can grow to be 8 feet high, is better known for its smell than its beauty.

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