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The Survey Says: "Tulsa Needs More Cops"

An analysis of Tulsa Police Department staffing says the city needs more than 200 additional cops, most of them on patrol. The report was presented to the Tulsa City Council this morning during the Public Safety Task Force meeting. Over the last decade, the city's murder, rape and assault rates have been in the top 25. University of Cincinnati researcher Nick Coraso says there is a bright spot however. He says the TPD out performs many agencies on how many of those crimes it solves. Corsaro...
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Flu Shot Time in Tulsa

The Tulsa Health Department is now offering seasonal flu vaccinations. Health officials remind residents that getting vaccinated against the flu is the single best way to prevent the flu. The flu vaccine can keep you from getting the flu, make the illness less severe if you do get it, and keep you from spreading the virus to family and other people. The vaccine is recommended for everyone over six months of age. Persons at high risk of serious complications from flu are especially advised to...
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The Gilcrease Museum Presents "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley"

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly opened exhibit at Gilcrease, "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley," which will be on view through January 3rd. As is noted of this show at the Gilcrease Museum website: "More than 150 years after his Smithsonian gallery burned to the ground, John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective exhibition. Considered the premier painter of the American West and a prolific artist, Stanley traveled thousands of miles...
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This We Do Know About TPP: The Shouting Is Already Loud

Even though President Obama has not yet released details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership announced Monday, supporters and opponents are making their voices heard — at full volume.Business leaders and interest groups hope their impassioned pleas will sway Congress, which must vote on the proposed deal next year.This is what the cheers sounded like:"TPP is a major win not only for the beef industry, but for all U.S. export products, growing the economy while supporting jobs and investments in...
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Was Kunduz Attack A War Crime? Legal Analysts Say It's Difficult To Prove

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz."We're under the clear presumption that a war crime has been committed," Jason Cone, Doctors Without Borders' executive director, told NPR's Michel Martin on Sunday. "And we're demanding that a...
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Physics Nobel Awarded For Work On Neutrinos' Metamorphosis

Two scientists from Canada and Japan have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for opening "a new realm in particle physics," the Nobel Prize committee says. Working far apart, both Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald showed how neutrinos shift identities like chameleons in space.The revelation that neutrinos — the subatomic particles that are more numerous than any other in the universe except for particles of light — undergo a metamorphosis led to a second and shocking conclusion:...
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Friends, family and fellow activists paid homage to late civil rights leader Julian Bond on Tuesday night at a memorial service at the historic Lincoln Theatre in Washington, D.C. The former NAACP chairman died in August at 75 after a brief illness.

Bond's widow, Pamela Horowitz, welcomed the invited guests — a diverse group that included civil rights activists, members of Congress and college students — and thanked them for honoring his mission and "how you will continue to honor him by doing the work that consumed his life."

The Houston Astros, a surprise success early in the Major League Baseball season before cooling off, will get to keep playing after knocking out the New York Yankees 3-0 in a one-game wild card playoff.

Solo home runs by Colby Rasmus in the second inning and Carlos Guzman in the fourth inning gave Houston an early lead, and starting pitcher Dallas Keuchel gave up just three hits while striking out seven in six innings of work.

Both home runs came off of the Yankees' Masahiro Tanaka. Carlos Beltran and Alex Rodriguez, batting third and fourth, struck out four times.

Ten years ago, Stephenie Meyer put a twist on the whole boy-meets-girl thing.

In her young adult novel Twilight, girl meets vampire, and later, werewolf. The supernatural romance between Bella and Edward sparked a saga that includes four best-selling books translated into more than 50 languages and five blockbuster movies.

Women with cancer often lose their fertility after chemotherapy and radiation. But fertility can be restored in some women by removing all or part the ovary, freezing the tissue before cancer treatment and then transplanting it back afterward.

Danish researchers looked at 41 women who underwent the procedure between 2003 and 2014. They found that about one-third who tried to have a baby actually succeeded.

It's the largest number of transplants evaluated since doctors started doing the procedures in the early 2000s.

For the past few years, crime has been mostly a good news story — the crime rate remains near record lows. But several major U.S. cities have been experiencing a rise in homicides and other violence this year.

Now, the Justice Department is bringing together police and prosecutors to figure out what's going on, and how the federal government can help.

When it comes to eating well, should we consider both the health of our bodies and of the planet?

America's retirement statistics are grim: About 40 percent of baby boomers have nothing saved for retirement, about a third of Americans who are currently retired rely on Social Security for almost all of their income, and the outlook for current workers isn't much better. About half of private sector employees have no retirement plan on the job.

"China, China, China," rants Donald Trump, the presidential hopeful who loses no opportunity to blame America's economic woes on China and its "unfair" trade policies. But how did the fortunes of the free world and the Middle Kingdom become so inextricably intertwined? What started it all?

The roots of U.S.-China trade can be boiled down to one fragrant little word: tea. The history of the tea trade is a fascinating story of wealth, adventure and cultural exchange, but also a tragic one of human suffering and cruelty.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



Among the institutions devastated by the flooding in South Carolina is the home of a ballet company.

Dancers from around the world have come to Columbia to dance in the Columbia Classical Ballet Company, founded more than 20 years ago by Radenko Pavlovich.

Now the company's 32 members have nowhere to rehearse or take classes. Their building, renovated just this summer, has been completely destroyed.

During the flooding, water reached up to the ceiling of the studio. Costumes and music scores were ruined.