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Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma Gets Poor Grade on State Finances But Isn't Alone

A nonprofit that analyzes state finances has given Oklahoma a D grade. "Oklahoma has accumulated over $5 billion in unfunded debt, debt beyond the assets available to pay the bills, which, in our framework, really represents costs for services that were delivered to citizens in the past but they're effectively going to have to be paid by future taxpayers," said Truth in Accounting Research Director Bill Bergman. Truth in Accounting’s analysis looks at all of a state’s liabilities, including...

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East Central University

Chapel Stirs Up Controversy in Oklahoma College Town

A small chapel nestled on a university campus in a rural central Oklahoma town is at the center of a firestorm over the use of religious symbols on public property after a Washington, D.C.-based group insisted that a cross be removed from atop its steeple. East Central University initially complied with a request from Americans United for Separation of Church and State, removing Bibles and other Christian-themed items from the colonial-style chapel. But before the cross could be taken down,...

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Kim Jong Un Issues Statement On Trump: 'A Frightened Dog Barks Louder'

North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has weighed in on the heightened tensions on the Korean peninsula, with a personal analysis of President Trump's Tuesday speech at the United Nations General Assembly . Trump's speech, which was notable for its apocalyptic rhetoric — it vowed to "totally destroy" North Korea and its 25 million people if the United States had to defend itself and its allies — aroused greater fears of military miscalculation that could lead to catastrophe. Kim, in a lengthy...

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Celebrating 70 Years of Public Radio Tulsa with Scott Horsley

StudioTulsa

On this installment of ST, a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome the noted book critic, editor, and retired librarian Nancy Pearl back to our show. A former Tulsan, she's also the longtime book reviewer for this program, and she can be heard talking about books from time to time on NPR's Morning Edition. Nancy has a new novel out -- it's her first, and it's called "George and Lizzie" -- and it was thus praised by Booklist (in a starred review): "Pearl dramatizes a complicated and deeply illuminating union of opposites and conducts profound inquiries into the self, family, empathy, and love.

On this broadcast of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Chris Bernard, the executive director of Hunger Free Oklahoma. This nonprofit, per its website, "works to bring a unified, statewide voice to the issue and solutions surrounding hunger, with a goal to ensure all Oklahomans have access to affordable, nutritious food. Hunger Free Oklahoma holds the core belief that hunger is solvable, unnecessary, and unjust, and it impacts everyone living in Oklahoma.

Tomorrow night, Saturday the 16th, the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will open its new season with a Gala Concert at the Tulsa PAC (beginning at 8pm). On the program, the "Hungarian Dances No. 1 and No. 5" by Brahms, the "Miraculous Mandarin Suite" by Bartok, and the masterful " Piano Concerto No. 2" by Brahms (which will feature a special guest soloist, the noted pianist Jon Kimura Parker).

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A John Coltrane Birthday Broadcast (on the Next All This Jazz)

The legendary John Coltrane, who died in 1967, would have turned 91 on Saturday the 23rd. On the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on that same Saturday, our third-hour theme (running from 11:00 till midnight) will be A John Coltrane Birthday Broadcast . Thus we'll hear Trane's tunes performed by a host of different jazz greats, including Archie Shepp, the SFJAZZ Collective, Karrin Allyson, Steve Kuhn, and more. And elsewhere in our program, we’ll dig music by the likes of Woody Shaw,...

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Stinson Dean, an entrepreneur from Independence, Mo., is used to taking risks. He buys Canadian softwood framing lumber to sell to lumberyards in the U.S. and says coping with the ups and downs of the market is an inevitable part of doing business.

But when he started the company about a year and a half ago, he laid down a firm rule.

"One of the things I wasn't willing to risk was the health of my family," Dean says.

A Suicide Reverberates In 'The Ninth Hour'

36 minutes ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bill Gates Regrets Ctrl-Alt-Delete

36 minutes ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Berlin's Tegel is a relic of the Cold War period when each sector of the divided city had its own airport. After German reunification, it was decided that Berlin needed a new international airport on its outskirts, called Berlin Brandenburg, or BER.

Kristy and Dana Dumont were ready to give a child in need a permanent home. They moved into a Dimondale, Mich., house with two spare bedrooms and a spacious, fenced-in yard, in a school district with strong extracurriculars and a diverse community.

The couple of 11 years began seriously considering adoption after Dana started receiving emails from Michigan's Department of Health and Human Services looking for foster and adoptive families.

For the past six weeks, voters in Germany have been inundated by campaign posters ahead of Sunday's national election.

Passersby walking down the street in just about every German city, town or village get a detailed look at who is running in their district and a condensed version of their campaign messages.

Green Party posters warn Germans to "either end coal or end climate." Another message: "Healthy food doesn't come from nature that's sick."

The anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany placards are even blunter.

President Trump's poll slide appears to have stabilized.

Trump, who came into office with the lowest approval and favorability ratings of any president, saw a steady decline in the months that followed his inauguration.

Hispanic Heritage Month is a nationally recognized, not-quite-a-month. (It's the back half of September and the front half of October).

This week, I went to the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore to sit in on a conducting class led by Marin Alsop, the music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The Maestra was showing several Peabody students — aspiring young conductors — some of the fine points of leading an orchestra, as they led musicians through Don Juan, the dramatic tone poem by Richard Strauss.

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