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Many Oklahoma Employees Get Raises Despite Salary Freeze

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Thousands of Oklahoma state employees received pay raises last year and thousands more were hired despite warnings of an approaching budget shortfall and a personnel freeze ordered by Gov. Mary Fallin. The Oklahoman reports in a copyright story that the freeze included exceptions when justification could be shown. State officials say the raises were needed to keep high-quality employees from taking jobs in the private sector or with the federal government and that becaus...
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Hearing Monday for Ex-Deputy Charged in Fatal Shooting Case

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy charged with second-degree manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed man is due in court. The hearing on Monday is expected to be the last for ex-Tulsa County Sheriff's Office volunteer deputy Robert Bates before his April 18 trial. Bates is charged in the shooting death of Eric Harris last April. Bates left the agency after the shooting and has pleaded not guilty. He says he confused his handgun and stun gun. The shooti...
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Super Bowl 50: Denver Broncos Take Home The NFL Title

Peyton Manning is once more on top of the world. The Denver Broncos quarterback — a future Hall of Famer in what may be his final season — is once more a Super Bowl champion. The Broncos have beaten the Carolina Panthers, 24-10.The game fell well short of a quarterback duel, though. Again, it was the Denver defense that led the way, harassing Cam Newton, forcing turnover after turnover and even tacking on a score of their own.It was sloppy, it was often ugly, but it was, without a doubt, the ...
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StudioTulsa

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On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Kristen T. Oertel, the Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century American History here at TU.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

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Day After Deadly Quake In Taiwan, Survivors Still Emerging From Rubble

More than 24 hours after a deadly magnitude-6.4 earthquake struck Taiwan, rescuers are still pulling survivors out of the rubble.The earthquake hit at roughly 4 a.m. local time on Saturday (Friday afternoon in U.S. time zones), just two days before the Lunar New Year celebrations. The city of Tainan was the hardest hit — and a single building, a 17-story apartment building that toppled like a folding accordion, caused most of the casualties.At least 26 people are confirmed dead from the quake...
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Only a few people survived when a boat carrying migrants capsized in the Aegean Sea on Monday, Turkish Coast Guard officials say. At least 24 people perished — including 11 children.

The boat had been heading for the Greek island of Lesbos, Turkey's Hurriyet Daily News reports, adding that the boat is believed to have embarked on a new route to Lesbos to avoid "intensified security measures to prevent migrant crossings."

For more than two decades, New Hampshire has been a place of redemption for the Clintons. That could come to an end Tuesday night.

The Granite State revived the Democrat's 2008 campaign after a devastating Iowa loss to Barack Obama. That victory helped her become the new "Comeback Kid" — the same moniker her husband Bill Clinton proclaimed after his strong finish in the state in 1992 jumpstarted his road to the nomination.

Old Mouse Trap Still Works Just Fine

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Taiwanese President-elect Tsai Ing-wen is promising extensive safety checks of old buildings two days after an earthquake killed at least 38 people, according to local media. New questions emerged after stacks of cans were found in the walls of a 17-story building that was the scene of all but two of those deaths.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Kung Fu Panda slurps noodles. An ugly/cute "puppy-monkey-baby" toddles into a living room. Kevin Hart stalks his daughter and her date to an amusement park via helicopter. Just three moments that various brands paid $5 million per 30 seconds to parade in front of Super Bowl viewers last night.

Victor Vardanyan, 14, isn't having any of it.

A lot of Republicans will head to the polls in New Hampshire on Tuesday, motivated to vote against Donald Trump.

But because of a quirk in how the state party allocates delegates and how fractured the "establishment" field is, it could mean that an anti-Trump vote will actually be a vote for the New York billionaire.

Here's how:

The state party awards delegates on a proportional basis to presidential candidates based on their vote statewide and by congressional district.

But it also has a 10 percent threshold.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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