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2 Oklahoma Agencies Looking to Hire Earthquake Scientists

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Two Oklahoma agencies grappling with the increasing number of earthquakes are looking to hire scientists to aid in their efforts. Oklahoma Corporation Commission spokesman Matt Skinner said Friday the agency is close to offering a contract for a geophysicist who will work with the agency's oil and gas division. That division regulates the wastewater disposal wells that scientists have linked to the increase in quakes. Also Friday, the head of the Oklahoma Geological Surv...
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2 charged with Murder of Bystander after Robbery in Norman

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — A 17-year-old and a 19-year-old have been charged with first-degree murder after police say they attempted to retaliate against people who robbed marijuana from them. The Norman Transcript reports that Anthony Bing Alexander Mundell and a 17-year-old were charged Thursday in the death of 41-year-old Kenneth Keeling on December 14th. Court documents say the pair told a friend they found the people who they thought robbed them. Mundell told police their friend started shoot...
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A Voter's Guide To The Health Law Chatter

Nearly six years after its enactment, the Affordable Care Act remains a hot issue in the presidential race – in both parties."Our health care is a horror show," said GOP candidate Donald Trump at the Republican debate in South Carolina in December. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, winner of the Iowa caucuses, said at the debate in Des Moines that the health law has been "a disaster," adding it's "the biggest job-killer in our country."Democrats largely support the law, but even they can't agree on how to...
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StudioTulsa

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Kristen T. Oertel, the Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century American History here at TU.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

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On the Next All This Jazz...Recorded in 1966: Jazz Albums of Fifty Years Ago

Listen for the next All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 6th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM...and online via live stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org. Our program delivers three hours of modern/recent/classic jazz, across a range of styles, each and every Saturday night -- from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.) From Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, John Aberc...
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As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

All football players know they're one big hit away from the end of their career. Delvin Breaux was a high school senior with a scholarship on the line when he took one of those hits. It broke his neck.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

With February comes Black History Month in the U.S., a time designated to reflect on the history and contributions of people of African descent in this country. And while the month may invite debate among some, one thing rarely does in the U.S.: the idea of calling oneself, or being described as, black or African-American.

Can a kid succeed in school with only a mobile device for Internet access at home?

Lorena Uribe doesn't have to think about that one:

"Absolutely not," she says.

When her old computer broke down several years ago, she and her teenage daughter found themselves in a bind for about five months: homework to do and no computer or broadband access at home.

"I would take her to the mall and have her sit in Panera so she could use the Wi-Fi on her iPad from school," Uribe says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has said he is a different kind of candidate running a different kind of campaign. He doesn't have a SuperPAC and he doesn't want one. One of the things his supporters say they like about him is Sanders isn't a typical politician.

With the assistance of Russian airstrikes, President Bashar Assad's forces are pressing ahead with a major offensive around the northern city of Aleppo, a development that has sent another wave of Syrian civilians seeking refugee in neighboring Turkey.

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