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ConocoPhillips Cutting 10% of World Work Force

NEW YORK (AP) — Energy company ConocoPhillips says it is cutting around 1,810 jobs, or 10 percent of its workforce, following a plunge that took oil prices to their lowest levels in years. The company says the biggest proportion of the job cuts will be in North America. ConocoPhillips plans to eliminate more than 500 jobs in Houston, where it is based. In a news release, ConocoPhillips said it's making the cuts because the energy industry is in a "dramatic downturn." ConocoPhillips has...
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AUDIO: A Link Between Test Scores and Fresh Air Confirmed

A study conducted by researchers from The University of Tulsa’s Indoor Air Program, shows maintaining adequate ventilation and thermal comfort in classrooms could have direct impacts on student learning and performance. Appearing Aug. 28 in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, the groundbreaking research with both national and international implications is unlike any other published to date, examining the combined effect of classroom ventilation and temperature on academic performance. Findings...
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StudioTulsa

A Vision-Funding Appeal to Expand and Refurbish the Tulsa Performing Arts Center

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing series of interviews with organizations vying to be included in the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. This extension is expected to go before voters in the spring of 2016, and over the past couple of months, many area organizations (from Gilcrease Museum to the Tulsa Zoo; from Tulsa Transit to Langston University) have been presenting proposals in this regard to the Tulsa City Council. We at StudioTulsa...
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5 Skills President Obama Will Need To Survive A Day With Bear Grylls

President Obama has slow-jammed the news on late-night TV and sat down with wacky YouTube celebrities. The show he's joining this week might just make those appearances look buttoned up and boring.On Tuesday, President Obama will shoot an episode for the NBC show Running Wild with Bear Grylls. In each episode, Bear, a survivalist, takes a different celebrity into the wild.According to NBC, the president will trek through the wilderness and "receive a crash course in survival techniques." The...
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3 Ways September Could Be A Challenging Month For Trump

This has been the Summer of Trump on the campaign trail. Donald Trump has flown high in the polls, with seemingly nothing emerging to slow his rise.But as heading into September, here are three hurdles the reigning Republican front-runner might have to contend with that run counter to his success so far:1. Raising money (or pouring more of his own in) to try and launch a professional campaign operation. Trump continues to downplay the need for his campaign to raise money. But if he's serious...
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Hungary Closes Budapest Train Station To Migrants Traveling To Western Europe

A flood of migrants, including refugees from Syria and Afghanistan, were stranded in Budapest after the Hungarian government closed down the city's main train terminal.Authorities had been allowing migrants to travel to Western Europe without checking passports, but on Tuesday, the station was closed and migrants began protesting.The BBC reports:"About 1,000 migrants congregated outside Keleti station, in the east of the city, as it was evacuated on Tuesday. It was closed briefly and public...
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In most European Union countries, it's fringe groups that drive anti-migrant sentiment. Not so in Hungary, where the government is busy stoking the fire.

Hungary is now the main gateway for asylum-seekers headed to northern Europe, with thousands arriving in the eastern European country every week. The prime minister, Viktor Orban, and his government are capitalizing on the crisis to bolster their increasingly right-wing platform.

Taylor Swift Is Dreaming Of A Very White Africa

35 minutes ago

The video for American singer Taylor Swift's new song "Wildest Dreams" has been viewed more than ten million times in the two days since it debuted.

The video was shot in Africa and California.

A police officer was shot and killed in a suburb north of Chicago this morning, and local and federal authorities are conducting a manhunt for three suspects.

The officer radioed to dispatchers that he was going to check on suspicious activity around 8 a.m. local time in the city of Fox Lake, Lake County sheriff's office spokesman Christopher Covelli said at a news conference. The officer, who has not yet been identified, then said he was in a "foot pursuit," before losing contact.

The Islamist militant group al-Shabab ambushed a base for African Union peacekeepers in southern Somalia early Tuesday.

The base, some 60 miles south of the Somali capital Mogadishu, is the second to be attacked this summer by the al-Qaida-linked militant group, NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast unit. He says it raises questions about the success of the eight-year peacekeeping mission.

Trying to divine what the future holds is an ancient human preoccupation. And for centuries, soothsayers have sought answers in the bottom of a teacup.

Amy Taylor was 18 when she stumbled into the practice of reading tea leaves. Now 46 and a professional tea-leaf reader, she remembers looking into her stepsister's teacup at a Toronto restaurant, and saying, "Oh, that's funny, that looks like a tree." She says she looked at all of her family's cups that night, and saw things in all of them. "I just thought that was really odd," she says.

Ever since the U.S. and its partners finalized the nuclear deal with Iran in July, Secretary of State John Kerry has tried to downplay what diplomats call the possible military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

"We're not fixated on Iran specifically accounting for what they did at one point in time or another. We know what they did," Kerry said this summer. "We have absolute knowledge with respect to the certain military activities they were engaged in. What we're concerned about is going forward."

For novelist Jonathan Franzen, writing isn't just an escape from himself, it's an "escape from everything." He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "It's like having this dream that you can go back to, kind of on demand. When it's really going well ... you're in a fantasy land and feeling no pain."

At a festival on the Danish island of Fyn, Claus Holm, a fast-talking Danish celebrity chef, is sniffing and mixing into a pot of stew an ingredient he calls "totally forbidden." It's cream, and it expires today.

Danes' increasing willingness to buy and consume items like just-expired dairy products has helped make them, arguably, the world champions in the fight against food waste. According to a recent report from the Danish government, Danes now throw away 25 percent less food than they did five years ago.

In a resolution that could have wide effects, California's prison system has agreed to change how it handles solitary confinement — and to review the cases of nearly 3,000 prisoners who are currently in solitary. The changes are part of the terms of a newly settled class-action lawsuit.

As part of the settlement, the state is agreeing to a central demand of the plaintiffs: to stop placing inmates in solitary confinement solely because of a gang affiliation.

"Lawyers for the prisoners say more than 1,500 people could be moved out of solitary," NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

The Takács Quartet, recognized as one of the world’s great ensembles offers performances described as "peerless in artistry," "seraphic in unity of execution," "searing" and "inspiring."  Playing with a unique blend of drama, warmth and humor and combining four distinctive musical personalities, the Quartet brings fresh insights to the string quartet repertoire in live performance and through its award winning discography.

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