Top Stories

Oklahoma House Passes Special Session Bills to Cut Agency Budgets, Fund Medical Schools

The Oklahoma House approved budget cuts Monday in order to fund state government through the end of the 2018 fiscal year in June. House Bill 1020 is a measure from the legislature's second special session that cuts state agency budgets by 0.66 percent across the board in order to trim nearly $45 million. That’s the shortfall left after the Oklahoma Supreme Court struck down a cigarette fee passed at the end of the 2017 legislative session, erasing more than $200 million from the state budget....

Read More
State of Oklahoma

Oklahoma Lawmaker Delays Resolution Seeking Judge's Removal

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma lawmaker isn't pushing for a vote on a resolution to oust a judge who approved probation for a man who admitted raping a 13-year-old Texas girl at a church camp in southern Oklahoma. Republican Rep. Mike Ritze tells The Oklahoman newspaper he's putting the resolution on hold so lawmakers can focus on other issues, including the state budget. The resolution wouldn't be legally binding. But it asks the Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary to begin proceedings to...

Read More

ISIS' Parting Gift To Its Former Capital: Thousands Of Explosive Booby Traps

The city of Raqqa was the de facto capital of the Islamic State. ISIS fighters were defeated there back in October, and they scattered in all directions. But they left behind a deadly legacy - thousands upon thousands of explosive booby traps. Now U.S. and Syrian trainers are teaching young men how to dismantle those bombs, at a village on the outskirts of the city. In an exercise a Syrian instructor and his young student are trying to do just that. A mock explosive is set inside the metal...

Read More

Join Us!

February 22 for The Give and Take on Sentencing Reform

Part 10: The Thing Called Love

StudioTulsa

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

The author and journalist Mark Whitaker is our guest on StudioTulsa. A former managing editor of CNN Worldwide, and a previous Washington bureau chief for NBC News, Whitaker has a new book out, which he tells us about. It's an "expansive, prodigiously researched, and masterfully told history" (Kirkus Reviews) called "Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance." As was noted in an appreciation of this book in USA Today: "Pittsburgh was one of the country's citadels of black aspiration in music, sports, business, and culture.

On this installment of ST, our guest is Cameron Walker, the Executive Director of Tulsa Habitat for Humanity (or THFH). This crucial nonprofit recently received a $6.7 million grant from the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, and therefore, as we learn on today's program, THFH is transitioning from building 25 to 30 houses per year (which is what it does in the Tulsa area currently) to building 150 houses per year (which is what it aims to be doing four years from now).

Women are the fastest-growing prison population group in the United States today -- and the State of Oklahoma, tragically, puts women in prison at twice the national rate. On this edition of ST, we check in with the non-profit organization known as Still She Rises, a public defender office based here in our community that's dedicated to representing North Tulsa mothers within the criminal justice system. Still She Rises, which began operations in Tulsa about a year ago, grew out of a similar group in NYC known as The Bronx Defenders.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about "NEW/NOW: Works by the Tulsa Artist Fellowship," the first-ever museum exhibit dedicated to artworks by fellows in the Tulsa Artist Fellowship program. This show, on view at the Philbrook Downtown space through March 3rd, presents various media and styles in newly created pieces by 20+ artists working here in the Tulsa community.

More StudioTulsa

While Ed Sheeran crooned about the shape of some unknown woman, French Olympic ice skater Gabriella Papadakis was struggling to keep her own shape under wraps.

Seconds into the routine, Papadakis said she felt the emerald collar of her costume become unhooked behind her neck. Apparently, the fabric of her bejeweled outfit pushed and pulled the opposite of the way a magnet do. [Hint: Ed Sheeran lyrics.] And despite her best efforts to keep the audience from discovering something brand new, her left breast was eventually exposed on live television.

Washington Capitals forward Devante Smith-Pelly, was in the penalty box after a third period fight with a Blackhawks defenseman on Saturday night when four Blackhawks fans started taunting him in unison.

"Basketball, basketball, basketball," they chanted.

"It's pretty obvious what that means," Smith-Pelly said on Sunday. "It's not a secret." The non-secret racial stereotype at play here is that basketball is a "black" sport and hockey is for white people.

Varied Reaction To Florida School Shooting

4 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Grocery Bagging Champ

4 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the fall of 2008, Omega Young got a letter prompting her to recertify for Medicaid.

But she was unable to make the appointment because she was suffering from ovarian cancer. She called her local Indiana office to say she was in the hospital.

Her benefits were cut off anyway. The reason: "failure to cooperate."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As the Senate tries to hash out a deal on immigration, it's not just immigrants that have a lot at stake. So do the businesses that hire them.

"We are suffering very much from shortage of labor — skilled labor — here in Dalton," said Ahmed Salama, the CEO of Oriental Weavers USA, the American branch of a giant Egyptian company. Salama recently showed me around his factory in Dalton, Ga., where hulking machines weave bright-colored yarn together.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages