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Gov. Mary Fallin's Office

Fallin Vetoes Most of Special Session Budget Bill

Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed Friday evening most of the bill lawmakers passed in special session to deal with Oklahoma's $215 million budget hole. Fallin vetoed all but five of the 170 sections in House Bill 1019, passed earlier Friday by the Senate and Wednesday by the House of Representatives. "House Bill 1019 does not provide a long-term solution to the re-occurring budget deficits, and within three months we will come back facing an estimated $600 million shortfall," Fallin said. Fallin...

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Civil Rights Coalition Dings TPD Body Camera Policy

Like 75 other agencies evaluated, the Tulsa Police Department’s body camera policy doesn’t pass muster with a national civil rights coalition. The Leadership Conference scorecard said TPD doesn’t meet most of their standards. The standards it does not meet are making the policy publicly and readily available, prohibiting officers from reviewing footage before writing an initial report, limiting the time footage is retained for, protecting footage against tampering and misuse, making footage...

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Chief Of Puerto Rico's Power Authority Resigns Under Fire

The head of Puerto Rico's power authority stepped down Friday amid controversy over his handling of a system that still can't deliver electricity to that island two months after Hurricane Maria destroyed the power grid. Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, resigned as he was unable to shake off questions about a $300 million contract that he had awarded to Whitefish, a small Montana-based energy firm, that was supposed to restore power on...

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On the Next All This Jazz: Some Wonderful Live Recordings

Join us for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 18th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Our third-hour theme (running from 11pm till midnight) will be Live Recordings -- and so we'll hear some stellar live-in-performance tracks from guitarist Mark Whitfield, saxophonist Cannonball Adderley (shown here), bassist Jaco Pastorius, and many others. And elsewhere in our show, we'll dig the music of Joanne Brackeen, Dave Holland, Anat Cohen, Tim Armacost, and more. Join us...

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StudioTulsa

"To have great poets," as Walt Whitman once noted, "there must also be great audiences." And great cities, it would seem, likewise require great bookstores. On this edition of ST, we learn about Magic City Books -- an indie bookstore owned and operated by the non-profit Tulsa Literary Coalition (or TLC) -- which will soon, at long last, open for business in downtown Tulsa. Indeed, after a series of construction-related delays, Magic City Books will open on Monday the 20th at 9pm...with Mayor G.T.

Our guest is Helen Thorpe, a Denver-based journalist and author whose newest book, just out, is called "The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom." As noted of this work in a starred review from Publishers Weekly: "The latest work of narrative nonfiction from Thorpe ('Soldier Girls') brings readers face to face with the global refugee crisis through the story of a Denver English-acquisition class composed of teenage refugees from all over the world.

Our guest on ST is Issa Kohler-Hausmann, who will tomorrow night (Thursday the 16th) deliver the 2017 Judge Stephanie K. Seymour Distinguished Lecture in Law here at TU.

On this edition of ST, Robert Dallek is our guest; he is the well-regarded American historian whose books include "Camelot's Court" and "Nixon and Kissinger," among several others. He joins us to talk about his newest volume, "Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life." As was noted of this book in a Christian Science Monitor review: "[Dallek] believes that FDR was a born politician of ferocious and very nearly infallible instincts, and through a combination of extensive research and first-rate storyteller's gifts, [Dallek] makes the reader believe it, too.

(Note: This interview originally aired in May of this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

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It was an unusually busy week on Capitol Hill.

The House passed the tax bill, largely along party lines. Now it's on to the Senate, where Republicans are tacking on a rollback of the Obamacare individual mandate.

You are in a foreign country. And things are certainly looking a bit foreign.

Do you sit or squat? Can you toss toilet paper down the bowl or hole?

Let the signs guide you.

That is, if you can understand them.

Doug Lansky, author of the Signspotting series of books, knows how toilet etiquette signs can be mysterious, misleading and hilarious. His books include all types of funny warning and advice signs, but the topic of toilets is especially popular.

Two dozen third-graders wiggle in their seats. Their attention is on their teacher — up front. He has a question for them: How many know about condoms? About half of the class raise their hands. The students are fixed on his talk — a lesson on sexual education and gender equality.

Everyone inside the classroom in Kaohsiung, Taiwan's second largest city, is captivated with this lesson. It's the people farther away — across the small island nation — that are not happy about this.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri flew from Saudi Arabia to Paris on Saturday, meeting French President Emmanuel Macron.

Macron is hoping to reduce tensions between groups in Lebanon backed by Saudi Arabia and opposing groups backed by Iran.

The trip ends a two-week stay during which Hariri resigned from his post, prompting speculation that he was being detained in Riyadh.

Hariri's surprise resignation came on Nov. 4 while visiting Riyadh. He is a dual national of Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

The head of Puerto Rico's power authority stepped down Friday amid controversy over his handling of a system that still can't deliver electricity to that island two months after Hurricane Maria destroyed the power grid.

Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, resigned as he was unable to shake off questions about a $300 million contract that he had awarded to Whitefish, a small Montana-based energy firm, that was supposed to restore power on the island.

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The Faroe Islands is a tiny archipelago about halfway between Iceland and Norway.

LEVI HANSSEN: There are a lot of people that don't even know that we exist.

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