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Rights Marches in Oklahoma Draw Big Crowds

Women in Oklahoma's two largest cities joined hundreds of thousands more in cities around the world to send President Donald Trump a message that his agenda won't go unchecked over the next four years. Organizers estimated at least 5,000 protesters marched at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City on Saturday and hundreds more in Tulsa— just two of some 600 cities around the world holding similar demonstrations. In Oklahoma City, protesters held signs that read "Unite Together" and "You Can't...

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Oklahoma State Capitol

With $900 Million Shortfall: Abortion, Firearms Among Topics of Bills Prefiled in Oklahoma

Some familiar topics like abortion and firearms are among those in the more than 2,200 bills and resolutions filed by Oklahoma House and Senate members ahead of the 2017 legislative session that begins Feb. 6. The 2,242 bills and resolutions filed by this week's deadline is about average for the first session of a Legislature in Oklahoma. There were 2,091 filed in 2015 and 2,466 introduced in 2013. While closing a massive budget gap and finding a way to increase teacher pay will be among the...

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Survey Finds Lyft Drivers Happier Than Uber, Though Pay Has Declined

Hundreds of thousands of Americans are now working as contractors for the rapidly growing ride-hailing industry, specifically for the largest companies, Uber and Lyft. But a new survey , released this week, finds that Lyft, with its fluorescent pink mustache symbol, is more popular with drivers. More than 75 percent of Lyft drivers said they were satisfied with their experience, while less than half of Uber drivers said the same. Lyft is a significantly smaller company, but its drivers made...

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The Many Faces Of Inauguration Day Attendees

People traveled to Washington, D.C., from around the country to witness the transition of power to the 45th president of the United States. Amid celebration and clashes, a few faces stood out. Watching giant screens, blocks away from the incoming president, these people braved crowds and weather to watch history being made. Ken Crider and his wife, Penny Age: 51 City of Residence: Detroit area Crider has a hat signed by Ted Cruz. Well, it began that way. Crider, an elector for Michigan,...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Kim Johnson, who became chief executive officer of the Tulsa City-County Library on January 1st. After more than 15 years as an employee of the TCCL, Johnson seems like a perfect fit for this leadership post. She's very committed, of course, to books and learning and literacy -- and to the vital purpose of libraries within society today -- and she's the first African American to lead the 24-branch system that is the TCCL.

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a systematic, wide-ranging, and newly released effort to improve the health of the people of Tulsa County (where more than 60 percent of the population is overweight or obese). Our guest is Bruce Dart, executive director of the Tulsa Health Department, who tells us about his organization's multi-faceted Community Health Improvement Plan (or CHIP).

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Daniel Hege, the Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra. Hege is back in town to conduct the TSO's next concert, which happens tomorrow night (Saturday the 14th) at 7:30pm in the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall. This concert will feature Beethoven's Symphony No. 4  as well as works by Mendelssohn ("The Hebrides") and Ravel ("Le tombeau de Couperin" and "Tzigane").

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On the Next All This Jazz: A Roundup of Outstanding Albums from 2016

Listen for the next All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 21st, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM...and online by way of our "Listen Live" stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org . ATJ delivers three hours of modern jazz, across a wide range of styles, every Saturday night from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.) From Art Farmer to Art Blakey, Duke Ellington to Duke...

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After weeks of uncertainty and political tension, the longtime ruler of Gambia, Yahya Jammeh, has boarded a plane to fly into exile.

On his first full day in the White House, President Trump went to the CIA presumably to try and offer an olive branch to members of the intelligence community he often maligned over their conclusions that Russia had conspired to influence the U.S. elections.

Instead, he falsely denied that he had ever criticized the agency, falsely inflated the crowd size at his inauguration on Friday, attacked the media and told intelligence officers gathered to, "Trust me. I'm like a smart person."

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