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Bridenstine's office

AUDIO: Bridenstine Confirmed as Next NASA Administrator

Oklahoma U.S. Rep. Jim Bridenstine is confirmed as the next NASA administrator. Senate Republicans pushed Bridenstine’s nomination to a vote today, which ended 50–49 with the help of some in the party who previously opposed Bridenstine. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot announcing he would retire at the end of the month helped sway him to vote for Bridenstine. "There’s no way NASA can go two years and X number of months without a permanent administrator. And...

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Progress Noted In Western Oklahoma Fire Fight

Firefighters are hoping higher humidity and milder winds will help them fight wildfires in Oklahoma. U.S. Forest Service spokesman Todd Schroeder said Thursday that a fire near Leedey, about 110 miles northwest of Oklahoma City, that has burned about 440 square miles is about 15 percent contained. A 106-square-mile blaze near Woodward, about 40 miles north of Leedey, is about 45 percent contained.

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8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?

Within seconds, a bright, white flash erupted on the lower deck of West Delta 105 E, an oil-production platform positioned a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast. Disoriented, one crew member found himself 10 feet away from where he had been working before he blacked out. Another likened the impact to a sledgehammer blow to his head. A third told investigators he felt like he'd been hit by an 18-wheeler, his hard hat, glasses and earplugs knocked off in the blast. For a fourth, death came...

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The Give and Take on Mental Health on April 23 at 5:30 P.M.

StudioTulsa

In the ongoing search for better treatment of mental health issues and illnesses, one crucial consideration is the trade-off between the effectiveness of a given treatment versus any unpleasant or damaging side-effects it might have. On this edition of ST, we are talking about one such treatment -- it's one that's actually been around for decades, but that is now being done in a much different (and far more nuanced) manner: electrical stimulation of the brain. Our guest is Dr. Hamed Ekhtiari, an associate investigator at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is the writer, cancer survivor, entrepreneur, and former Tulsa resident, Paige Davis, who is also the author of a new memoir: "Here We Grow: Mindfulness Through Cancer and Beyond." Davis will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming symposium known as Celebrating the Art of Healing 2018: "The Future is Now." This all-day symposium will happen Saturday, April 28th, at the Town & Country School in Tulsa (at 8906 E. 34th Street).

Our guest is Rob McKeown, a former food writer and food-magazine editor who's also done research and concept-development for renowned chefs and notable hotels and restaurants worldwide. He is the curator for "Botanical!" -- i.e., a series of fundraising events happening this weekend at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

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At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes ten. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Gina Haspel, the first woman nominated to lead the CIA, has a five-foot-tall poster of Johnny Cash in her office. She's an avid University of Kentucky basketball fan — though she transferred from that school and graduated from the rival University of Louisville. She majored in journalism.

A few months ago, I wrote a check for $12,000 but couldn't figure out exactly why.

The payment was to secure a place for my mother at Sligo Creek Center, in Takoma Park, Md. It's a nursing home and rehab center owned by Genesis Healthcare.

My mother was about to be discharged from Holy Cross Hospital, in nearby Silver Spring, after a fall. Medicare wouldn't pay for her rehabilitation care.

Africa's last absolute monarch has marked his country's 50th birthday with a rather unconventional gift: a different name. During Golden Jubilee celebrations Thursday, King Mswati III announced that from this point henceforth, the land formerly known as Swaziland is now to be known as the Kingdom of eSwatini.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo — a record for the agency — in punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses.

Wells Fargo's "conduct caused and was likely to cause substantial injury to consumers," the agency said in its filings about the bank.

A gunman shot and killed two sheriff's deputies in a restaurant in Gilchrist County, Fla., on Thursday, in an attack that seems to have come with no warning.

Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, were shot through the window. The gunman was later found dead nearby.

Sheriff Bobby Schultz called the two deputies "the best of the best," adding, "They're men of integrity, they're men of loyalty. They're God-fearing, and they loved what they did. And we're very proud of them."

Where other chefs might see kitchen trash, Tim Ma finds treasure — for his culinary creations, and his bottom line.

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