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State of Oklahoma

Opposition Grows to Fallin's Sales Tax Proposal

Thirteen more rank-and-file Republican legislators have announced their opposition to Gov. Mary Fallin's plan to expand the existing state sales tax to dozens of services that are currently exempt. A news release Tuesday from the Oklahoma House says 27 House and Senate members have publicly said they are opposed to Fallin's sales tax proposal. The state faces a budget shortfall of nearly $880 million and Fallin has proposed expanding the sales tax, along with increases in the tax on...

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REAL ID Compliance Bill Clears First Oklahoma Senate Hurdle

After lengthy debate, an Oklahoma Senate panel advanced a bill Wednesday to let Oklahomans get identification compliant with 2005's federal REAL ID Act. Lawmakers forbid state participation in the REAL ID Act’s implementation 10 years ago. House Bill 1845 lets Oklahomans choose compliant or non-compliant driver licenses and ID cards. Shawnee Republican Sen. Ron Sharp said there are some flaws in the bill, but it’s time to act. "If this compromise is the only way we can get this so individuals...

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Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Clean Up As Deadline Looms

In North Dakota, authorities set Wednesday as the deadline for the dwindling number of protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline to clean up and go home. At the main protest camp, a massive cleanup effort has been underway. Semi trucks have been hauling debris out of camp and people here are piling garbage into bags. "It looks like a trash pile. But it's getting picked up and every spot is starting to look better and better as we work together," Dotty Agard of the Standing Rock Sioux...

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For Islanders In Lake Superior, Warmer Winters Mean They Can't Drive

For Michael Childers, ice makes getting around a little easier. When it's thick enough, the ice on Lake Superior creates a makeshift road between Bayfield, Wis., and Madeline Island, the small resort island where Childers and about 250 others live year-round. But for the second year in a row, warmer winters have made it necessary for the ferries that usually don't operate during winter to continue to run. The ferry is a lifeline for islanders, transporting schoolchildren, commuters, vehicles...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, our guest is psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker. He joins us to discuss his book, "War Torn: Stories of Courage, Love, and Resilience." With 200 million people affected by armed conflict or genocide worldwide, refugees are appearing in record numbers; indeed, not since World War II have so many war-affected migrants been relocating around the globe.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy as well as the Latin America Initiative at the Brookings Institution. His research is focused on global democracy and human rights policies, and he spoke recently at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations. Piccone is the author of "Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order," and his talk here in Tulsa was basically an extension of this book.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Giles Milton back to our show; he's a British historian and author whose many books include "Nathaniel's Nutmeg" and "When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost His Brain." He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is called "Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat." As was noted of this exciting work of history by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] an elegant presentation of Winston Churchill’s special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war....

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

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In the waning years of the Civil War, advertisements like this began appearing in newspapers around the country:

INFORMATION WANTED By a mother concerning her children.

Local law enforcement officers are arresting people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

The governor of North Dakota had set Wednesday as the evacuation deadline for the largest protest camp, which is on a flat area north of the Cannonball River. He cited flooding concerns.

At the Oscars this weekend, one spotlight will shine on African-American women in the space race, thanks to the movie Hidden Figures, which is nominated for three academy awards, including best picture.

Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, his comments on illegal immigration have been pored over in the press — from vows to deport millions of people to promises that any enforcement plan would have "a lot of heart." Observers asked, again and again, how rhetoric would translate into actual policy.

Now activists and experts have the policies themselves to examine.

Flooding in San Jose, Calif., has prompted the evacuation of at least 14,000 residents.

The mandatory evacuation orders began overnight, and will remain in effect for at least another day, reports Peter Jon Shuler of member station KQED.

"Flooding along Coyote Creek came after a series of heavy rainstorms combined with water rushing down the spillway of nearby Anderson Reservoir, which is now filled to capacity," he says. "Emergency crews had to rescue more than 250 people from their homes by boat."

The Dakota Access Pipeline's route takes it over four states and nearly 1,200 miles, from the Bakken oil fields in northwestern North Dakota through South Dakota, Iowa and down to a terminal in Illinois.

But one Missouri River crossing just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota has become the focal point of a fight over how the pipeline's route was analyzed and approved by the federal government.

News of recent anti-Semitic acts in the U.S. — like the toppling of tombstones in a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis and bomb threats against Jewish community centers — is being followed closely in Israel. So is the Israeli government's response to these incidents.

Some Israelis are questioning whether Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has played down the incidents to keep pressure off his political ally, President Trump.

Disability rights activist Nick Dupree died last weekend. Tomorrow would have been his 35th birthday.

Back in 2003, he told NPR: "I want a life. I just want a life. Like anyone else. Just like your life. Or anyone else's life."

He got that life.

The 15th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which takes place every four years, begins later this spring in Fort Worth, Texas. For the past six weeks, judges have been traveling the world to hear potential competitors audition. One notable stop is Moscow — where the American pianist for whom the contest is named stunned the world 59 years ago, winning the International Tchaikovsky Competition at the height of the Cold War.

Democrat Michelle Frankard of Wisconsin voted for President Trump, and she's hoping she won't regret it.

At the Garden of Eatin', a bustling diner in picturesque Galesville, Frankard is having breakfast with her adopted father, Ken Horton. A dozen shiny electric guitars line the walls, each next to a black-and-white framed poster with the likes of Johnny Cash and Janis Joplin. The deep-seated booths host a variety of regulars and those just passing through.

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