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Budget Hole Tops $1.3 Billion

Oklahoma finance officials say the hole in next year's budget has increased to $1.3 billion, or nearly 20 percent of last year's spending, amid depressed oil prices. The Office of Management and Enterprise Services announced Thursday plunging revenue collections have widened the shortfall from the original projection of $900 million in December. A state panel led by Gov. Mary Fallin will meet next week to certify how much legislators can spend in the fiscal year that begins July 1. Fallin's...
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Big Changes Coming to Downtown Tulsa Streets Starting This Fall

Boulder Avenue will get an overhaul between First and 10th streets in downtown Tulsa. Work should begin this fall to convert it into a two-way street. Water line repairs and fixes to make crossings compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act will also be involved. "You go in some of those areas and it's like, it's hazardous for folks in wheelchairs and those kind of things, so, we're able to pick that up as we do these one-way to to-way conversions," said City Engineer Paul Zachary. ...
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The 6th Democratic Presidential Debate In 100 Words (And 3 Videos)

The sixth Democratic presidential debate may have been in Wisconsin, but the candidates' focus was South Carolina. Issues important to black voters came up repeatedly, as did loyalty to Obama and other things we've grown accustomed to, like heated debate over Wall Street's influence. Foreign policy veered into a debate about the '70s and Henry Kissinger. Ultimately, Clinton tried to drive home the point that she and Sanders have much in common, except she would get things done. Sanders...
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we learn about a novel called "The Unraveling of Mercy Louis," which has just recently appeared in paperback. Our guest is the author, Keija Parssinen, who grew up in Saudi Arabia and Texas before graduating from Princeton University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Parssinen is now an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa, and she tells us about the themes, experiences, and ideas that led to the creation of this (her second) novel.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a documentary film that will be screened tonight (Thursday the 11th) in Helmerich Hall on the TU campus. The screening is free to the public, and it will also feature a panel discussion; it begins at 7pm. The film is question is "Children of the Civil Rights," and our guest is Julia Clifford, who directed it. As noted of this film at the "Children of the Civil Rights" website: "No one knew a group of children in Oklahoma City were heroes; not even the children themselves.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of business practices and sustainability goals in contemporary America -- and of where these two ideas do and don't (and might someday) overlap. Our guest is Bill Roth, a business-book author, green entrepreneur, and consultant on sustainability; he'll be speaking soon in our community.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about the Blue Zones Project.

On this installment of ST, we welcome back to our program the well-regarded, Ohio-based choreographer Edwaard Liang, who is currently working with Tulsa Ballet on a production of his special version of "Romeo and Juliet," which will be staged February 12th through the 14th. Shakespeare's tragic tale of two passionate yet ill-fated lovers will be presented in the Tulsa PAC, with the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra playing Prokofiev's immortal score.

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On the Next ATJ: Jazz Goes to the Grammy Awards

Listen for the next broadcast of All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 13th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM...and online by way of PublicRadioTulsa.org.Our program delivers three hours of modern jazz -- across a range of styles -- each and every Saturday night, from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.)From Benny Goodman to Benny Carter, Sonny Clark to...
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As national security has come to dominate the 2016 presidential race, the GOP contenders in particular are being pushed to define where they stand on a contentious matter: how suspected terrorists should be interrogated. Specifically, they've been asked about the currently banned use of waterboarding — a simulated drowning technique the CIA used on at least three alleged terrorists.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

There was a time when the world of World Cafe and the world of the Grammys only intersected with a few Contemporary Folk nominees. These days, that category doesn't even exist — hello, Americana! — and World Cafe guests like Melbourne's Courtney Barnett are cropping up as nominees across the board.

If you work in a restaurant, marriage proposals are good for business. Happy couples lift the mood in the entire dining room and often turn into lifelong customers. That once-in-a-lifetime experience for them is pretty routine for restaurateurs.

It's been a year since I began serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in northern Ghana — but some of the local lingo still eludes me. I speak a good amount of Dagbani nowadays, but I still can't figure out why everyone's been telling me recently: "You used to be the tall visitor and now you're the small villager." Is that good or bad? I mean, I haven't shrunk as far as I can tell.

The crisis of contaminated water in Flint, Mich., is making a public health message like this one harder to get across: In most communities, the tap water is perfectly safe. And it is much healthier than sugary drinks.

That's a message that Dr. Patty Braun, a pediatrician and oral health specialist at Denver Health, spends a lot of time talking to her patients about.

Chipotle Mexican Grill certainly is not the first company to face lawsuits and subpoenas because its food made people sick. Other companies, in fact, have faced far worse: Companies like Blue Bell, Dole and Earthbound Farms have been linked to disease outbreaks that actually killed people.

But it's difficult to think of another case in which a company's food-safety troubles provoked such schadenfreude in the food industry. The company, it seems, made a lot of enemies while marketing its "food with integrity."

Rokia Traoré's Commitment To Her Culture

5 hours ago

When we hear about Mali, it's usually about that country's civil war.

But the west African nation has long been a shining star of music and culture. It's where the annual Festival in the Desert once attracted visitors and pop stars from around the globe.

New York Mets reliever Jenrry Mejia received a permanent ban from Major League Baseball on Friday after he tested positive for the anabolic steroid Boldenone. The right-handed pitcher is the first player to be banned from the MLB for life for failing three performance-enhancing drug tests.

The league's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program states that a third violation for performance-enhancing drugs results in a permanent suspension. But it also says:

The U.S. and Cuba will sign a civil aviation agreement in Havana on Tuesday, re-establishing air service between the two countries for the first time in more than 50 years, the U.S. Department of Transportation said.

The signing formalizes the arrangement that was reached Dec. 16, stating that a certain number of flights would be allowed to fly from the U.S. to Cuba every day. As the Two-Way previously reported:

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