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Tulsa Police

"See Something, Say Something". Texas Copycats Have Local Officials Concerned

The Texas bombings have officials here concerned about copy-cat explosive packages. Bombs have exploded in Austin and San Antonio causing deaths and injuries. Tulsa Bomb Squad Sergeant Jacob Thompson says if a package, you are NOT expecting, shows up on your porch use caution. He says there are things to look for before you touch it. Be sure the package has a correct mailing label. It has been shipped from a legitimate company. The box does not appear to be tampered with or damaged. Is...

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Law Enforcement Investigates Fake ID's

Homeland Security, Oklahoma Alcohol Beverage Law Enforcement, and the Tulsa Police Financial Crimes Unit are working to halt a fake ID factory. At least 100 false ID’s have been intercepted in the past several months, some bound for Oklahoma students. Corporal Matt Rose with TPD says at least one has been confiscated at a downtown Tulsa bar. He says it’s difficult to tell the real from the fake. The ID’s are being ordered online and then mailed to high school and college students in Oklahoma...

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'I'm Ready To Call 911': Austin On Edge With 'Serial Bomber' At Large

More than 500 investigators and bomb techs have streamed into Austin, Texas, to look for clues and to catch what they're now calling a "serial bomber." Five explosions have killed two people and injured several more, one gravely. In the latest attack, a package bound for Austin exploded at a FedEx distribution facility. Before that, two men in their early 20s were walking along a quiet street Sunday night when they tripped a wire that exploded a bomb near a hiking trail, authorities said ....

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Part 12: In The Beginning...


Our guest is the accomplished nonfiction writer, journalist, and essayist, Anna Badkhen, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow at work on her first novel. She joins us to discuss her book, "Fisherman's Blues: A West African Community at Sea," a detailed and engaging volume just recently published. Per the Dallas Morning News: "In elegiac vignettes, Badkhen portrays the trick and snare of a heroic and punishing profession....

Our guest on ST is the Right Honourable Henry McLeish, a former professional football player, who began his political career in Fife, Scotland, in the early 1970s. He was later elected to the United Kingdom Parliament (in 1987) and then became a member of the Blair Government (in 1997). McLeish became First Minister of Scotland in 2000, taking responsibility for Scotland's emerging role on the European as well as the World stage, leading official government missions internationally, and implementing Scotland's social and economic policies.

It's been commonly noted that we as human beings are basically hard-wired for long walks -- and for the thinking, observation, and spiritual reflection that always comes with such walks. Henry David Thoreau, for example, believed that walking alone through the woods was in itself a remedy for most of life's problems. Another such person might be the journalist and storyteller Steve Watkins, who's our guest on ST. In his new book, "Pilgrim Strong: Rewriting My Story on the Way of St.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the Austin-based, Montana-raised filmmaker Alex Smith, who's currently visiting TU in order to screen and answer questions about his feature film, "Walking Out." (The film will be shown tonight, the 13th, at the Lorton Performance Center; the screening is free to the public.) Smith and his twin brother Andrew work together on various film and TV projects, and "Walking Out" is their most recent movie.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

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For years Harjit Masih has been talking about what happened outside of the Iraqi city of Mosul, the Associated Press reported. He and 39 other Indian men — all construction workers working on the Mosul University campus — had been kidnapped by members of ISIS as the extremist group waged its assault on the city.

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Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your biology — or art — classroom?

It's possible those bones are not plastic, but actual human remains. A lot of classroom skeletons, in high schools, universities and medical schools, are real.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

The turmoil for Facebook isn't letting up. The social media giant is facing more blowback from users, regulators and investors following reports that its user data was misused by Cambridge Analytica, a firm that worked for the 2016 Trump presidential campaign.

That has spurred a user boycott, as angry former Facebook users started turning to Twitter over the weekend to express their discontent. David Chartier, a freelance writer in Chicago, was one of them:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Poet Philip Levine discovered jazz on the radio when he was a teenager.