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Storms Cause Damage Across the State

Emergency management officials say more than a dozen recreational vehicles and campers were overturned by winds as strong storms moved across southwestern Oklahoma. Comanche County Emergency Management spokeswoman Ashleigh Hensch says 13 vehicles were overturned and several were destroyed shortly before 7 a.m. Friday at Lake Lawtonka in Lawton. Hensch says one person was taken to a hospital with undisclosed, but non-life threatening injuries. Hensch said the damage is believed to be due to...

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UCO

Longtime Higher Ed Leader to Retire

The president of the University of Central Oklahoma says he plans to retire next year. Don Betz announced Friday he will step down as UCO's president on June 30, 2019. The 73-year-old Betz was named UCO's 20th president in June 2011. The Regional University System of Oklahoma Board of Regents will select Betz's successor. Betz says in a statement he is confident that the board will choose a president capable of leading the university. A university biography of Betz says he has been involved...

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Analysis Finds Geographic Overlap In Opioid Use And Trump Support In 2016

The fact that rural, economically disadvantaged parts of the country broke heavily for the Republican candidate in the 2016 election is well known. But Medicare data indicate that voters in areas that went for Trump weren't just hurting economically — many of them were receiving prescriptions for opioid painkillers. The findings were published Friday in the medical journal JAMA Network Open. Researchers found a geographic relationship between support for Trump and prescriptions for opioid...

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Pianists Barron Ryan and Donald Ryan
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Classical Tulsa Podcast: Sitting Down with Ryan & Ryan

On this Classical Tulsa podcast, host Jason Heilman sits down with pianists Donald Ryan and Barron Ryan , who perform together as the father-and-son duo of Ryan & Ryan . With a wide-ranging repertoire encompassing classical, jazz, film music, and more , they've thrilled audiences in Tulsa and beyond with their virtuosic displays of piano pyrotechnics. In this interview, the Ryans describe their expenriences performing together and introduce selections from their brand-new album, "Kickin'...

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Live at the Village Vanguard...on the Next All This Jazz

Tune in for the next broadcast of All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 23rd, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. It'll be three solid hours of can't-miss modern jazz -- all of it introduced, contextualized, and lovingly selected by an actual person (i.e., not by a robot).... Also, in the third and thematic hour of our show, our theme will be Live at the Village Vanguard . Lorraine Gordon, who ran this long-running and legendary NYC jazz club for decades, died recently at age 95...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Tulsa-based playwright Ilan Kozlowski, whose two-act dramatic comedy, "Shades of White" will be staged at the Tulsa PAC on June 22nd and 23rd. As noted of this work at the Tulsa PAC website: "Set in Tulsa in 1996 -- the 75th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre -- [this play] explores the relationships between an Israeli immigrant and a former member of the Ku Klux Klan and their wives. Narrow-minded Dr. Whitehill and his crone of a wife, Birdie, are set in their miserable ways until Dr.

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Physicians for a National Health Program (or PNHP). This collective, per its website, is "a nonprofit research and education organization of 20,000 physicians, medical students, and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance." Our guest is Dr. Ed Weisbart, who heads the Missouri Chapter of PNHP.

(Note: This interview originally aired in January.) For a number of different -- and often unsettling -- reasons, issues of race and racism have by now come into focus in American life in a pervasive manner that we, as a society, have not seen in decades. Or maybe, actually, we as a nation have never been as racially aware, or as racially alert, as we are at this moment. Thus we're discussing an important textbook in this regard; "Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice" first appeared back in the 1990s, and it has just been published in a new (fourth) edition.

(Note: This interview originally aired in December.) Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

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Just about 10 days ago, Katie Arrington was celebrating a hard-fought electoral win. The conservative South Carolina state lawmaker had dealt longtime incumbent Rep. Mark Sanford a surprising defeat in the state's congressional GOP primary.

Now Arrington, 47, is in the hospital facing quite another kind of fight.

A friend had been driving the U.S. House hopeful Friday night when their car was struck by a vehicle driving the wrong direction on the highway, according to her spokesperson.

The U.S. and South Korea have called off upcoming military exercises that were set to occur over the next three months, the Pentagon announced Friday evening.

According to the statement, Defense Secretary James Mattis made the decision to "indefinitely suspend select exercises," including the Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise, which was put on hold earlier this week, along with two Korean Marine Exchange Program training exercises.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

The fact that rural, economically disadvantaged parts of the country broke heavily for the Republican candidate in the 2016 election is well known. But Medicare data indicate that voters in areas that went for Trump weren't just hurting economically — many of them were receiving prescriptions for opioid painkillers.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A Global Guide For Leery Travelers

5 hours ago

With its tropical beaches and a memorable national park, Venezuela was a popular destination for American tourists a decade ago. But years of political and economic turmoil have left its tourism industry in tatters.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

World Health Organization recognizes gaming as addictive disorder

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

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