Top Stories

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Tulsa County Breaks Ground on New Family Justice Center

Tulsa County officials finally broke ground Friday on the new downtown Family Justice Center. Voters approved the facility in 2014, but it’s been delayed as officials whittled down estimated costs and sent the project back out for bid. The new building, located at Archer Street and Elwood Avenue, will replace a deteriorating one at 315 S Gilcrease Museum Road. It will also be bigger. District Court Juvenile Division Chief Judge Doris Fransein said the extra space is needed for more than just...

Read More
npr

Oklahoma Senate Rejects Proposal to Delete Most Police Body Camera Video After 90 Days

The Oklahoma Senate defeated a measure this week to let law enforcement agencies in the state store most body camera footage for just 90 days. Agencies would submit to their district attorneys for approval guidelines on how they would determine if videos must be kept longer. Sen. Wayne Shaw said the measure was requested by the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office. "It costs approximately $80 a month per police officer to store that information, which, just for Tulsa County alone, is talking about...

Read More

8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?

Within seconds, a bright, white flash erupted on the lower deck of West Delta 105 E, an oil-production platform positioned a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast. Disoriented, one crew member found himself 10 feet away from where he had been working before he blacked out. Another likened the impact to a sledgehammer blow to his head. A third told investigators he felt like he'd been hit by an 18-wheeler, his hard hat, glasses and earplugs knocked off in the blast. For a fourth, death came...

Read More

The Give and Take on Mental Health on April 23 at 5:30 P.M.

StudioTulsa

In the ongoing search for better treatment of mental health issues and illnesses, one crucial consideration is the trade-off between the effectiveness of a given treatment versus any unpleasant or damaging side-effects it might have. On this edition of ST, we are talking about one such treatment -- it's one that's actually been around for decades, but that is now being done in a much different (and far more nuanced) manner: electrical stimulation of the brain. Our guest is Dr. Hamed Ekhtiari, an associate investigator at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is the writer, cancer survivor, entrepreneur, and former Tulsa resident, Paige Davis, who is also the author of a new memoir: "Here We Grow: Mindfulness Through Cancer and Beyond." Davis will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming symposium known as Celebrating the Art of Healing 2018: "The Future is Now." This all-day symposium will happen Saturday, April 28th, at the Town & Country School in Tulsa (at 8906 E. 34th Street).

Our guest is Rob McKeown, a former food writer and food-magazine editor who's also done research and concept-development for renowned chefs and notable hotels and restaurants worldwide. He is the curator for "Botanical!" -- i.e., a series of fundraising events happening this weekend at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

More StudioTulsa

The cannons were quiet this time but there was fire and smoke anyway at the Manassas National Battlefield Park during a prescribed burn intended to maintain the look of the area as Civil War soldiers would have known it.

The National Park Service says it waited for ideal weather conditions to spark the blaze last week on 60 acres of Brawner's Farm where soldiers fought on Aug. 28, 1862, during the Battle of Second Manassas.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was charged Friday with a felony of illegally obtaining a fundraising list from a veterans charity the once-rising political star co-founded.

The new charge of tampering with computer data filed by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner comes on top of other criminal allegations against Greitens, including an earlier charge of felony invasion of privacy, as well as accusations of sexual assault and blackmail.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warning to consumers Friday to stay away from all types of romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region because of an E. coli outbreak that has infected at least 61 people in 16 states.

The agency had previously instructed people not to eat chopped and bagged romaine lettuce from the area. But the new warning includes whole heads of romaine in addition to all of the packaged products.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A startup company in California is using machine learning and artificial intelligence to advise fire departments about how to plan for earthquakes and respond to them.

The company, One Concern, hopes its algorithms can take a lot of the guesswork out of the planning process for disaster response by making accurate predictions about earthquake damage. It's one of a handful of companies rolling out artificial intelligence and machine learning systems that could help predict and respond to floods, cyber-attacks and other large-scale disasters.

A U.S. district judge handed a sentence of life in prison today to a driver who was transporting undocumented immigrants in a tractor-trailer so hot that ten people died.

"I am so sorry it happened," said James Matthew Bradley Jr. in a video statement played in court which The San Antonio Express-News reported. "There's not a day or night that goes by that I don't relive this scene."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The issue of James Comey's memos is where we're going to begin our Friday political chat. Kristen Soltis Anderson of the Washington Examiner and author of "The Selfie Vote" is here in the studio. Hi, Kristen.

KRISTEN SOLTIS ANDERSON: Hi.

Pages