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A Few Hundred Follow Sharpton in Demonstration over Terence Crutcher's Death

Protesters demanding justice for Terence Crutcher march to Tulsa's city hall. The demonstration is part of a day of justice called for last week by Crutcher's family, their attorneys and Rev. Al Sharpton. Sharpton was on hand to lead the march. He praised Tulsa police for releasing video of the shooting but said there are two more steps to take. "We need to know why all of the police there — what is going to be the disciplinary action there? I want to know what is going to be done for his...
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Oklahomans with Licenses Revoked for DUI May Get Them Back

Tens of thousands of breath tests used in hearings to revoke Oklahoma driver's licenses after DUIs are invalid. The problem lies with testing machines used throughout the state. "The issues in this case, specifically, was the canister and the mouthpiece. They were not properly approved, so they were using unapproved equipment," said attorney Bruce Edge. The Oklahoma Supreme Court decided not to take up the state’s appeal of a lower court ruling saying rules to approve the testing equipment...
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Who Got What They Wanted From The First Clinton-Trump Debate?

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump."Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski...
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StudioTulsa

Do you happen to know, among your circle of friends and relatives and colleagues, a "pack rat" or two -- i.e., people who just can't seem to throw things away? On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of compulsive hoarding, which is an anxiety disorder affecting a great many Americans that makes it quite difficult for someone to discard with possessions, regardless of the actual value of those possessions.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Phil Klay, a writer and veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps whose 2014 short-story collection, "Redeployment," won the National Book Award for Fiction. Klay will appear in our community soon as part of a "Creative Writing Celebration" being presented by TU's newly established Creative Writing segment within the Department of English.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Philip Howard, a professor of community sustainability at Michigan State University. He's also president of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and is a member of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about the Bob Dylan Archive, that widely-reported-on treasure trove of 6,000+ items documenting the entirety of the legendary singer-songwriter's still-active career. This archive was purchased earlier this year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa; it will be housed at TU's Helmerich Center for American Research (which is located within the Gilcrease Museum).

On this edition of ST, our guest is Yuval Rabin, son of the late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who will appear at the Circle Cinema tonight (Tuesday the 20th) as part of the 3rd Annual Oklahoma Jewish Film Festival. This event is a special screening-plus-Q&A gathering co-presented by the Circle Cinema, the Jewish Federation of Tulsa, and the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. Mr.

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Fall 2016 Public Radio Tulsa Pledge Drive

Dear Friends of Public Radio Tulsa, We get a LOT of questions from listeners here at the station. Everything from “How do I donate my car? (Easy!)” to “Did you know you’re off the air??? (Yep.)” to “I heard this one story this one time about this one guy…what was it? (Ummm…)” Last spring, we decided we needed to do some asking. We surveyed our newest donors, asking them about their favorite programs, when they listened, how long they had been listening, and more. And we requested their...
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A Dutch-led team of international investigators has concluded that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, which crashed in July 2014, was shot down by a Russian Buk missile that had been transferred into rebel-held eastern Ukraine.

After the shooting, the surface-to-air missile launcher was transferred back.

The results of the investigation were announced on Wednesday. Investigators said they were confident about which weapon was used and where it was fired from — but that the investigation into who exactly was responsible for the missile will take longer.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

2 Couples In Love Attract Attention

25 minutes ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the local news:

  • Rallies and Counter-Rallies are held in Tulsa.
  • A woman is stabbed to death. Police suspect her son.
  • Turnpike tolls are headed up in Oklahoma

We've all been there — having fun relaxing with friends and family, when someone says something a little racially off. Sometimes it's subtle, like the friend who calls Thai food "exotic." Other times it's more overt, like that in-law who's always going on about "the illegals."

In any case, it can be hard to know how to respond. Even the most level-headed among us have faltered trying to navigate the fraught world of racial awkwardness.

Even though Marca Engman read countless books, watched YouTube videos and took a beekeeping class before installing her first hive in 2012, she knew she'd need help in the field.

"The whole idea of beekeeping was overwhelming," she recalls. "Every year is different and every hive is different."

Rather than working a backyard beehive solo, Engman installed her first hive in the community apiary at Hudson Gardens, a nonprofit garden near Littleton, Colo.

Judy Maggiore remembers looking in the mirror in college, perplexed by her body's disproportion.

"I was skinny. I was a stick. The upper part of my body was really, really thin. You could see my ribs!" exclaims Maggiore. "But from the waist down, it was like there were two of me or something."

Tree-trunk-like legs and a slim upper body are the signature characteristic of a lipedema patient. You can starve yourself and exercise for hours a day and the fat will not regress. But Maggiore didn't know that at the time. She swore off bathing suits and hit the gym fanatically.

First, a story:

Late one night, a man searches for something in a parking lot. On his hands and knees, he crawls around a bright circle of light created by a streetlamp overhead.

A woman passes, stops, takes in the scene.

"What are you looking for? Can I help?"

"My car keys. Any chance you've seen them?"

"You dropped them right around here?"

"Oh, no. I dropped them way over there," he says, gesturing vaguely to some faraway spot on the other side of the lot.

"Then why are you looking here?"

The man pauses to consider the question.

The Senate will be voting on Wednesday on whether to override one of President Obama's veto for the first time in his presidency.

The Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) would give families of Sept. 11 victims the right to sue Saudi Arabia for aiding or financing the terrorism attacks. The House is likely to take up the same vote by the end of this week.

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