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Oklahoma AG Says Health Board Will Hold Special Meeting to Walk Back Medical Marijuana Rules

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter said Thursday he’s received word the state board of health will hold a special meeting to follow his advice on medical marijuana rules. That will include undoing controversial, last-minute changes that attracted two lawsuits. The board amended proposed Oklahoma State Department of Health rules in order to ban the sale of smokable marijuana and to require pharmacists in dispensaries, which Hunter said they didn’t have authority to do. "It’s going to be a...

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HOT !

The hottest temperatures of the year so far will occur today, with afternoon highs ranging from 95 to 105. Heat index values will climb into the 105 to 110 degree range across the area this afternoon. Even hotter temperatures are expected Friday, but humidity levels will be lower than today. Afternoon heat index values will still approach 110 in some places Friday afternoon however. A weak cold front will push through the area by Saturday bringing somewhat cooler conditions, although heat...

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Democratic Senators Slam Trump's Pick To Run Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Democrats on the powerful Senate Banking Committee said Kathy Kraninger is not qualified to be the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency the White House has nominated her to run. Republicans at her nomination hearing Thursday said her management experience at the White House Office of Management and Budget qualifies her for the job. "I have the utmost confidence that she is well prepared to lead the bureau in enforcing federal consumer financial laws and protecting...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we begin our series of interviews with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Our guest tomorrow will be Democratic candidate Tim Gilpin; on today's program, we interview Amanda Douglas, also a Democrat. As per the Douglas campaign website: "Amanda Douglas was born and raised in Oklahoma. As one of four children in a low-income family, [she] wasn't handed a lot of opportunities in life.

T. C. Cannon (1946–1978, Caddo/Kiowa), Small Catcher, 1973–78. Oil on canvas. Collection of Gil Waldman and Christy Vezolles. © 2018 Estate of T. C. Cannon. Courtesy of the Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Craig Smith.

We learn about a striking show on view at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "T.C. Cannon: At the Edge of America" will run through October 7th of this year. It is, per the Gilcrease website, "the first major traveling exhibition of Cannon's work since 1990 and explores the dynamic creative range and legacy of an artist whose life was cut short at age 31.

The long-awaited Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture (or OKPOP) is our topic on today's StudioTulsa. The design of the downtown Tulsa building that will house this museum has jus been announced. The structure will be on Main Street, across the street from the Cain's Ballroom, with construction to begin in the fall of this year.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Gary Schwitzer, a longtime journalist and the publisher of the non-profit website HealthNewsReview.org, which he founded in 2006 (and which is now, due to time-limited funding, slated to cease operations at the end of 2018). This well-respected site, as per its Editorial Team page, has by now "grown to a team of about 50 people who grade daily health news reporting by major U.S.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we talk about the ongoing effort to make Route 66 a part of the U.S. National Park Serivce's National Historic Trail System. If this were to happen, Route 66 would become the 20th such trail in America, joining The Lewis and Clark Trail, The Oregon Trail, and others. This designation could mean a serious economic boost to our state, as Oklahoma has more Route 66 mileage than any other state through which the highway runs. We have two guests today.

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In the early 2000s — the beginning of the third decade of the AIDS epidemic--the world came together in an unprecedented global health effort to provide life-saving AIDS drugs to people even in the poorest corners of the world. It has been an overwhelming public health success story. In 2000, fewer than a million of the then 34.3 million people with AIDS were being treated with AIDS drugs, and almost all of them lived in wealthy countries.

Like any tantruming toddler, the 20-foot-tall baby Trump blimp hovering above Friday's protests in London was difficult to ignore.

Now a plan to bring a replica of the yellow-haired, phone-toting, sneering and diapered balloon stateside has garnered so much support that organizers say they will use the funds to buy multiple blimps "so we can go coast-to-coast, border-to-border."

'Brady Bunch' House Is Ready For A New Story

3 hours ago

The story continues for a house Americans used to visit every week. The Brady Bunch house is ready for a new family.

The famous home featured in the beginning and ending credits of the 1970s sitcom The Brady Bunch is for sale, according to a report by the Los Angeles Times.

Russian officials are saying the meeting in Helsinki between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin resulted in an agreement that includes cooperation between the two countries in Syria.

Speaking at a news conference next to Trump on Monday, Putin said establishing peace and reconciliation "could be the first showcase example of the successful joint work. Russia and the United States apparently can proactively take leadership on this issue," including overcoming the humanitarian crisis and helping Syrians go back to their homes.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A yearlong battle over a house that was painted to look like Vincent Van Gogh's The Starry Night, ended on Tuesday with an apology and an agreement to drop thousands in fees against the homeowners.

Nancy Nemhauser and Lubomir Jastrzebski had been embroiled in a legal feud with the city of Mount Dora, Fla., to keep their interpretation of the masterpiece on their home and the wall surrounding it, after the city fined them.

It's as if the pianos were haunted. Somewhere about midway through this Tiny Desk, as Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds performed on his electronic keyboard, two upright pianos were playing lilting melodies behind him, absent any performer at the keys. And yet these "ghosts," along with Ólafur's band of strings and percussion, put together some of the most beautiful music I've heard at the Tiny Desk, made all the more mysterious through its presentation.

Counting cats, much like herding them, is a complicated proposition.

But a coalition of groups in Washington, D.C., is giving it a shot.

PetSmart Charities, the Humane Society, the Humane Rescue Alliance and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute are collaborating on a project called the D.C. Cat Count, which aims to create a more accurate estimate of the city's entire cat population — both feral cats and pet cats.

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