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Oklahoma's 2019 Budget Comes up Almost $168 Million Short

The Oklahoma State Board of Equalization certified Tuesday a $6.18 billion budget for 2019. That includes a nearly $167.8 million shortfall — down from holes of $1 billion two years ago and more than $800 million last year. Gov. Mary Fallin said new revenue from higher taxes on some existing oil and gas wells and on car sales has helped. "It’s helped close that gap, so it’s not as big as what we anticipated, but we also have a large amount of obligations that are due now," Fallin said. New...

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Tulsa County Booking Photo

Majors Gets Life Without Parole for Hate Crime Killing

A 63-year-old Oklahoma man convicted of murder and a hate crime in the fatal shooting of his Lebanese neighbor was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Stanley Vernon Majors was convicted earlier this month of gunning down 37-year-old Khalid Jabara outside of his Tulsa home in August 2016. The murder charge carried a life sentence, and the jury recommended that Majors never get the chance to go free — a recommendation the judge followed Tuesday. The jury...

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ER Reduces Opioid Use By More Than Half With Dry Needles, Laughing Gas

NPR's "Take A Number" series is exploring problems around the world — and solutions — through the lens of a single number. One of the places many people are first prescribed opioids is a hospital emergency room. But in one of the busiest ERs in the U.S., doctors are relying less than they used to on oxycodone, Percocet, Vicodin and other opioids to ease patients' pain. In an unusual program designed to help stem the opioid epidemic, the emergency department at St. Joseph's University Medical...

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February 22 for The Give and Take on Sentencing Reform

Part 10: The Thing Called Love

StudioTulsa

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

The author and journalist Mark Whitaker is our guest on StudioTulsa. A former managing editor of CNN Worldwide, and a previous Washington bureau chief for NBC News, Whitaker has a new book out, which he tells us about. It's an "expansive, prodigiously researched, and masterfully told history" (Kirkus Reviews) called "Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance." As was noted in an appreciation of this book in USA Today: "Pittsburgh was one of the country's citadels of black aspiration in music, sports, business, and culture.

On this installment of ST, our guest is Cameron Walker, the Executive Director of Tulsa Habitat for Humanity (or THFH). This crucial nonprofit recently received a $6.7 million grant from the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, and therefore, as we learn on today's program, THFH is transitioning from building 25 to 30 houses per year (which is what it does in the Tulsa area currently) to building 150 houses per year (which is what it aims to be doing four years from now).

Women are the fastest-growing prison population group in the United States today -- and the State of Oklahoma, tragically, puts women in prison at twice the national rate. On this edition of ST, we check in with the non-profit organization known as Still She Rises, a public defender office based here in our community that's dedicated to representing North Tulsa mothers within the criminal justice system. Still She Rises, which began operations in Tulsa about a year ago, grew out of a similar group in NYC known as The Bronx Defenders.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about "NEW/NOW: Works by the Tulsa Artist Fellowship," the first-ever museum exhibit dedicated to artworks by fellows in the Tulsa Artist Fellowship program. This show, on view at the Philbrook Downtown space through March 3rd, presents various media and styles in newly created pieces by 20+ artists working here in the Tulsa community.

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Peter Wang, a 15-year-old member of the Junior ROTC who was killed as he tried to help fellow students escape a mass shooting in Parkland, Fla., last week, has been posthumously admitted to the U.S. Military Academy.

Wang and two other freshmen cadets, Martin Duque and Alaina Petty, both 14, were also awarded the Medal of Heroism – the highest medal given to Junior Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets.

Classmates and family said that Wang dreamed of attending West Point. The admission to the academy came on the same day as his funeral.

A meeting that was to have taken place between Vice President Pence and representatives of North Korea during the Winter Olympic Games fell apart when Pyongyang suddenly backed out, the State Department says.

The meeting, between Pence and Kim Yo Jong, the sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, and Kim Yong Nam, North Korea's nominal head of state, was to have taken place on Feb. 10 during the vice president's three-day visit to the Olympic venue.

The U.S. men's hockey team narrowly lost to the Czech Republic in a tight quarterfinal game that ended in a penalty shootout at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics tournament on Wednesday.

The final score was 3-2, after the Americans were unable to get the puck past Czech goalie Pavel Francouz. In the five-round shootout, only one player managed to score: Petr Koukal of the Czech Republic.

With the win, the undefeated Czech Republic team advances to the semifinals in the Olympics tournament. The Czechs outshot the Americans 29-20 in their game at the Gangneung Hockey Center.

Measles is highly contagious, but easily preventable with a vaccine.

However, the numbers of measles cases sharply jumped up in Europe in 2017, according to new data released by the World Health Organization.

In 2017, the disease affected 21,315 people, compared to 5,273 in 2016. Last year, 35 people died in Europe because of measles.

A 12-year-old boy, clocking speeds of more than 90 miles an hour, crashed a car into a tree in a southern Mexico City neighborhood, sending passengers flying out of the car, killing five and injuring three, all children.

Last summer, 53-year-old Jeff Murphy was hiking in Yellowstone National Park when he disappeared. Park investigators found his body on June 9, where Murphy had fallen 500 feet from Turkey Pen Peak, after accidentally stepping into a chute.

A Thai court on Tuesday granted sole custody of 13 children to a reclusive Japanese businessman who fathered the babies through surrogates, putting an end to a bizarre and controversial legal battle involving the man police called a "baby-factory."

Botanist David Fairchild grew up in Kansas at the end of the 19th century. He loved plants, and he loved travel, and he found a way to combine both into a job for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that took 17 lives followed one in rural western Kentucky by three weeks. The Kentucky shooter killed two high school sophomores and injured 18 other people.

In the wake of the tragedy at Marshall County High School in Benton, Kentucky's Republican governor and legislature say they won't consider gun any control proposals. Rather, a measure allowing teachers or staff to carry guns on campus has gained traction.

Republican state Sen. Steve West admits his bill isn't going to stop all school shootings, but he hopes it'll help.

An outside legal review of NPR's handling of allegations against its former top news executive, Michael Oreskes, found that questions were raised about his behavior toward women even before he was hired. And concerns about misconduct were reportedly flagged throughout Oreskes' 2 1/2-year tenure at the network right up to the day he was fired.

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