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Tulsa's Parkside Breaks Ground for an Expansion

At a time when cutbacks are hurting many medical facilities, a Tulsa psychiatric hospital is expanding. Ground is broken for a new state-of-the-art patient care treatment center at Parkside in Tulsa. Robert Farris is chairman of the campaign that raised $38-million for the new facility. He says at a time many hospitals are cutting back or curtailing some services, Parkside is doing just the opposite, stepping up and expanding to treat more patients. The five-story building, which includes 80...

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Indicted Sheriff Remains on the Job

An Oklahoma sheriff who was indicted with five others in the death of an inmate remains on the job, but two other employees have been placed on administrative leave. Garfield County Sheriff Jerry Niles tells the Enid News & Eagle that he's "here to work" following this week's unsealing of an indictment accusing him of second-degree manslaughter in last year's death of 58-year-old Anthony Huff. Five others were also indicted on second-degree manslaughter charges, and Niles says two of...

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After Trump Targets Murkowski, Interior Secretary Reportedly Warns Alaska's Senators

Hours after President Trump criticized fellow Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski's vote on debating health care legislation, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke reportedly called Murkowski and her fellow Alaskan, Sen. Dan Sullivan, to say their state could run into trouble with the Trump administration. Describing the call from Zinke, Sullivan told the Alaska Dispatch News , "I'm not going to go into the details, but I fear that the strong economic growth, pro-energy, pro-mining, pro-jobs and...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU.

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions." In an appreciation of this book by Publishers Weekly, we find: "Science journalist Begley demystifies compulsive behavior, exploring its history and manifestations and the many difficulties its sufferers face in finding appropriate diagnoses and treatment.

Living Arts of Tulsa -- a vital part of the arts scene here in town, and a long-running locally-based nonprofit that seems to be increasingly popular -- now has, for the first time in decades, a new artistic director. Our guest on ST is that individual: Jessica Borusky, who's been on the job for only two or three weeks at this point.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with Tulsa Transit Interim General Manager Debbie Ruggles. In a joint appearance, City of Tulsa and Tulsa Transit officials recently announced a new bus rapid transit line for our community, which will run mainly along Peoria Avenue. It will be known as the Aero system. Service on the Aero -- which will run in rotation from Peoria and 36th Street North to 81st and Lewis -- is expected to start in Spring 2019.

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Speaking at a news conference in Finland on Thursday, Russian President Vladimir Putin derided the sanctions bill now in the U.S. Congress as "illegal under international law" — but he said Russia's response will depend on what ultimately gets passed.

"We haven't seen the final version yet, so we haven't got any kind of definitive view on it," Putin said, "but we can see that over a lengthy period they are trying to provoke us more and more."

Why Are Undocumented Immigrants Smuggled By Truck?

9 minutes ago

The deaths of 10 migrants in a sweltering 18-wheeler in a San Antonio has raised a lot of questions. One of them: why transport people in the back of a tractor-trailer, especially after they have already crossed the border?

One reason, experts say, is that entering the United States from Mexico illegally involves "two crossings." You must first cross U.S./Mexico border, then one of the many border patrol checkpoints that exist farther into the United States.

The nation's highest-ranking military officer said Thursday that the Defense Department was making "no modifications" to current policy regarding transgender service members until President Trump gives more direction.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is traveling to El Salvador to meet with law enforcement officials and discuss efforts to combat the MS-13 gang.

Hours after President Trump criticized fellow Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski's vote on debating health care legislation, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke reportedly called Murkowski and her fellow Alaskan, Sen. Dan Sullivan, to say their state could run into trouble with the Trump administration.

The U.K. has only recently rolled out the largest warship the country has ever produced, testing the massive aircraft carrier's sea legs off the coast of Scotland, but already the British navy has a destination in mind for the HMS Queen Elizabeth and its still-to-be-named sister ship: the disputed waters of the South China Sea.

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET

Charlie Gard, a terminally ill British baby whose parents fought in court to transfer him to the U.S. for treatment, will be moved to a hospice facility to die.

A British judge approved the transfer plan on Thursday, days after Charlie's parents dropped their efforts to receive experimental treatments.

What would happen if you married an old custom — matchmaking — with something modern, like the ride-sharing app on your smartphone?

In Pakistan, that happened. Users of Careem, one of the country's most popular ride-sharing apps, woke up last week to this pop-up message on their phone: "Rishta Aunty Has Arrived."

At a security conference in Australia on Thursday, this scenario was posed to the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet: If ordered to do so by President Trump, would he would launch a nuclear attack on China next week? His response: Yes.

Yasaman Alavi grew up in Iran, a country with a vibrant food culture. "Food is a big part of life in Iran," says Alavi, a psychotherapist who now lives in Washington, D.C. She says her mother and aunt were excellent cooks who often prepared big feasts for family gatherings.

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