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Tulsa Remembers Dr. King

Tulsa pauses to remember the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The highlight of a weekend of activities is the annual MLK Day Parade in Tulsa.

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Plans in the Works to Create Citywide Tourism Improvement District

Tourism officials are working to set up a citywide special taxing district that will raise money to market Tulsa to potential visitors. Tourism improvement districts were authorized by a state law that took effect Nov. 1, and VisitTulsa President Ray Hoyt aims to have Tulsa’s established by April. "It's only hotels and not restaurants or anybody else, and the goal is that assessment is on occupied rooms. The hoteliers, like a business improvement district, have to agree to it — 50 plus one...

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In Final Speech As Attorney General, Loretta Lynch Says: 'We Have To Work'

Just days from the end of her tenure, Loretta Lynch took the stage Sunday at a historic Baptist church in Birmingham, Ala., to deliver her final planned speech as U.S. attorney general. "We can't take progress for granted," Lynch told the congregation. "We have to work. There's no doubt that we still have a way to go — a long way to go." In her speech, delivered on the eve of Martin Luther King Day, Lynch focused on her auspicious setting, Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. Last week,...

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For Female Inmates In New York City, Prison Is A Crowded, Windowless Room

More than a hundred female federal inmates, sentenced to long-term prison, have instead been held for years in two windowless rooms in a detention center in Brooklyn. Conditions for the women have been found to violate international standards for the treatment of prisoners. The problem in Brooklyn actually started in Connecticut, in what was the only federal prison for women in the Northeast. But the prison population across the country increased nearly 10-fold over the last 40 years, and men...

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StudioTulsa

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Daniel Hege, the Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra. Hege is back in town to conduct the TSO's next concert, which happens tomorrow night (Saturday the 14th) at 7:30pm in the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall. This concert will feature Beethoven's Symphony No. 4  as well as works by Mendelssohn ("The Hebrides") and Ravel ("Le tombeau de Couperin" and "Tzigane").

On this edition of ST, we learn about several special, free-to-the-public events scheduled for this coming weekend in connection with MLK Day. Events are planned for both Sunday the 15th and Monday the 16th in downtown Tulsa (with the 16th, of course, being the actual Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday). On the 15th, there will be a Walk of Peace and Solidarity as well as an Interfaith Commemorative Service. On the 16th, a Founders Breakfast will precede the 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a discussion that originally aired in February of last year. At that time, we spoke with Julia Clifford, the director of a documentary film called "Children of the Civil Rights." This film tells the little-known yet true story of a group of schoolchildren in Oklahoma City who -- for nearly six years -- staged Civil Rights-era sit-ins at various diners and lunch counters in OKC. These protests began in 1958, more than a year before the far more familiar Greensboro, North Carolina, sit-ins occurred.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Russian hacking attempts worldwide, of cyber-attacks on the DNC that were meant to affect the 2016 Presidential Election, and of related news stories. And we'll also discuss, in more detail, what might be seen as the hi-tech precursor to these stories -- that is, the Soviet Union's longtime efforts to create a kind of national internet...long before the internet itself actually existed.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion of trauma-informed therapy. Our guest is Dr. Sara Coffey, who works in the OU-TU School of Community Medicine's Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. We speak her about her wide-ranging efforts to treat kids for various kinds of trauma -- how she helps kids regulate their emotions, articulate their feelings, feel better overall, deal with all sorts of issues, and understand that the trauma at hand isn't their fault.

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Sparks On The Tracks: Kosovo, Serbia Spar Over Train Stopped At The Border

Bitterness between Balkan neighbors flashed to the surface this weekend after a train was turned back from the Kosovo border. The train, which had been painted with Serbian national colors and the phrase "Kosovo is Serbia," cut short its journey amid fears it was under threat of violence. Kosovo had deployed its special forces to prevent the train from crossing its border, The Associated Press reports . Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandr Vucic then ordered the train to stop in the Serbian town...

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The search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370 has been suspended, after nearly three years of fruitless work.

The airplane vanished from radar on March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board. Since then, nothing has been seen of the plane except for pieces of debris that floated far from the original crash site.

International search crews have examined more than 45,000 square miles of the Indian Ocean, where experts initially concluded the plane was most likely to be located, to no avail.

There hasn't been a more controversial pick for Secretary of Education, arguably, in recent memory than Donald Trump's choice of Betsy DeVos. The Senate confirmation hearings for the billionaire Republican fundraiser and activist from Michigan start today.

More than 30 years ago, Congress overwhelmingly passed a landmark health bill aimed at motivating pharmaceutical companies to develop new drugs for people whose rare diseases had been ignored.

By the drugmakers' calculations, the markets for such diseases weren't big enough to bother with.

As long as there has been a music industry, there have been attempts — both overt and clandestine — to manufacture hits. You can look as far back as the early 20th century, when musicians known as "song pluggers" were paid to promote sheet music.

Istanbul Governor Vasip Sahin told reporters Tuesday morning that the suspect in the attack on the city's Reina nightclub has confessed.

Sahin identified the suspect as Abdulgadir Masharipov, born in 1983, a national of the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan.

"The terrorist has admitted to his crime, and his fingerprints also matched those found on the scene," Sahin said.

Sahin said there are strong indications Masharipov was acting on behalf of the Islamic State and had entered Turkey illegally on its eastern border.

If you've ever visited the palm-lined neighborhoods of Beverly Hills, you've probably noticed that the rich and famous aren't the only ones drawn there.

Stargazers also flock to this exclusive enclave, seeking a chance to peer into — and fantasize about — the lives of movie stars and film directors.

Call it adulation, adoration, idolization: we humans are fascinated by glamour and power.

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A Clown Says Farewell To The Circus

13 hours ago

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Turkish police have arrested the "main suspect" from an attack on an Istanbul nightclub on New Year's Day that killed at least 39 people, according to the state-run Anadolu news agency.

Officials have not publicly named the suspect. The arrest happened late Monday during a police raid in the Esenyurt neighborhood of Istanbul, Anadolu reported.

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