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Sunday Bus Service is Here

Mayor Bynum announced today at a news conference Tulsa Transit will begin Sunday Bus Service on Sunday, July 2. The addition of Sunday Service for Tulsa Transit customers has been made possible through the Vision Tulsa sales tax, approved in April 2016. “This is the first time in the 49-year history of the Metropolitan Tulsa Transit Authority that we are offering service on Sundays,” said Mayor Bynum. “Tulsa residents who would like to ride the bus to places of worship, recreation and for...

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Charles Kimbrough

Time Capsule Prepared for State Capitol

A Native American flute, official state lapel pins and a turkey call from the Oklahoma lieutenant governor's annual turkey shoot are among the items being placed in a 100-year time capsule to be buried at the state Capitol. Gov. Mary Fallin joined other state leaders Monday for a ceremony at the Capitol to dedicate the stainless steel capsule. The box will be filled with artifacts, sealed and placed in a wall inside a wall in the new Capitol rotunda once renovations to the 100-year-old...

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Google Hit With $2.7 Billion Fine By European Antitrust Monitor

The European Commission has fined Google 2.42 billion euros ($2.72 billion) after finding that the company used its dominant search engine to drive people toward another Google product, its shopping service. "What Google has done is illegal under EU antitrust rules," said European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager. "It denied other companies the chance to compete on the merits and to innovate. And most importantly, it denied European consumers a genuine choice of services and...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa; "Hope & Fear: Propaganda of the Great War" will be on view through November 12th. Our guests are the show's co-curators, Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Librarian/Archivist Thomas Young. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "To commemorate the 100th anniversary year of America's entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the Museum's permanent collection.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about (brace yourself) dirty diapers and the parents who fixate on them. Our guest is Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, which is America's largest children's hospital. He tells us about his new book, which reveals the many useful solutions that he's both utilized and developed over the course of his distinguished career in addressing the digestive health problems of children.

Our guest is Todd Cunningham, the Executive Director of Arts Alliance Tulsa, which is, per its website, "a United Arts Fund that strengthens and supports the arts for a greater Tulsa through fundraising, support services, audience development, and responsible investment and allocation of resources." Comprised of dozens of outstanding nonprofit arts groups from throughout the Tulsa area, Arts Alliance Tulsa has only been around for a couple of years now -- but its very presence highlights the important role that the arts play in our community'

Theatre Tulsa -- founded in 1922 -- is the longest-running local theatre west of the Mississippi River, and the seventh oldest in the United States. To mark its 95th anniversary, the company will present a special presentation this weekend at the Tulsa PAC. The show, featuring a cast of one hundred or more, is called "Local Landmark, National Treasure: An Epic Concert Celebrating 95 Years of Theatre Tulsa" -- and it will be staged June 23rd and 24th at 8pm, and then on the 25th at 2pm.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) On this installment of ST, we chat with the British writer Kate Hamer, whose first novel has appeared here in the U.S. to widespread acclaim. "The Girl in the Red Coat," as an Amazon reviewer has noted of this book, recounts what is basically "every parent's nightmare: Beth, a single mother, takes her 8-year-old daughter, Carmel, to a local festival for some fun and frivolity and she vanishes. What follows is an unusual and terrifying journey for them both.

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Beekeepers Feel The Sting Of California's Great Hive Heist

19 minutes ago

Seventy-one million. That's the number of bees Max Nikolaychuk tends in the rolling hills east of Fresno, Calif. Each is worth a fraction of a cent, but together, they make up a large part of his livelihood.

Nikolaychuk makes most of his money during almond pollination season, renting out the bees to California's almond orchards. This year, a thief stole four stacks of his hives.

"He knew about the bees, because he went through every bee colony I had and only took the good ones," he says. "But, you know, the bee yards — I don't have no security there, no fences."

Tales from the American West are marked by heroism, romance and plenty of cruelty. Among those stories, the saga of the Donner Party stands alone — a band of pioneers set out in covered wagons for California, and eventually, stranded, snowbound and starving, resorted to cannibalism.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Three investigative journalists at CNN have resigned after the network retracted a story about a congressional inquiry into a link between a Russian investment fund and an American financier who is an adviser to President Trump.

Those departing are a past Pulitzer Prize winner, a finalist for the award and a senior editor who had been at CNN since 2001.

The U.S. State Department has issued highly public criticism of China in its latest annual report on the global state of human trafficking.

China is among the worst offenders of human trafficking, according to the Trafficking In Persons report. It's now lumped in with "Tier 3" offenders such as Syria, Iran, Russia and North Korea — the worst designation.

Advocates for ending child marriage are trying a new tactic: Show governments just how much the practice is hurting their own bottom line.

Suddenly, John McEnroe and Serena Williams are involved in a tennis match of words, and the pace picked up Tuesday. Both are rushing the net — stick with the metaphor here — and firing volleys.

First it was McEnroe, who told NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro on Sunday that while Williams is "an incredible player," (she's won 23 major singles titles and 14 in doubles) she'd be "like 700 in the world" if she played on the men's circuit.

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET

With their health care bill facing a perilous path, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP aides confirm to NPR's Susan Davis.

If you've never heard of Alexander von Humboldt, a once world-renowned Prussian scientist who predicted man-made climate change in 1800 and was an adviser to President Thomas Jefferson, then a New Hampshire distillery is aiming to change that, one glass at a time.

Updated at 1:21 p.m. ET

Ransomware hit at least six countries Tuesday, including Ukraine, where it was blamed for a large and coordinated attack on key parts of Ukraine's infrastructure, from government agencies and electric grids to stores and banks.

The malware is being called "Petya" — but there is debate in the security community over whether the ransomware is new or a variant that has been enhanced to make it harder to stop.

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