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Hofmeister

Oklahoma State Department of Education Requests $2.9B Budget for 2019

The Oklahoma State Department of Education has asked lawmakers for $2.9 billion next year. That nearly $474 million dollar increase includes almost $54 million more for the state aid formula. State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister said the cost to educate Oklahoma kids keeps climbing, as there are more of them every year and more with additional needs. "The needs — special education needs, for instance, English learners, poverty — those are weights that are attached to each student. So, the...

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Here is the Latest on the Winter Weather

Get the latest Winter Weather Information from KWGS: National Weather Service official forecast National Weather Service Maps The latest weather radar Closings The latest statewide winter weather advisories Oklahoma road conditions Power Issues from PSO OG&E Power Issues Power Issues at Rural Electric Co-ops

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Syrian Barrage Buries Civilian Areas: 'What Have We Done To Deserve This?'

As evening settled over eastern Ghouta on Tuesday, the suburb just outside Damascus lay battered by 48 hours of sustained airstrikes. And the approaching night promised still more horror for one hospital. By 5 p.m. local time, the Syrian American Medical Society says, barrel bombs had begun to fall in a downpour about the medical facility. "The hospital's entry points, as well as the pharmacy, were directly hit. These airstrikes continued to relentlessly target the vicinity of the hospital...

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StudioTulsa

Louis Lamone, Photographer; Bill Scovill and Norman Rockwell, ca 1962; Inkjet print, Norman Rockwell Collection, ©1962 Norman Rockwell Family Agency.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a new exhibition at Gilcrease Museum; "Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera" is the first exhibition to explore in depth the famous illustrator's richly detailed study photographs, which he used, quite carefully, as reference points for his iconic paintings.

Our guest is the writer and writing teacher Brandon Hobson, whose new novel, "Where the Dead Sit Talking," has just been published. Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, it's a spare, lyrical, and at times troubling story about a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy who's been placed in foster care. As was noted of this book in a starred Publishers Weekly review: "Hobson's narrative control is stunning....

Oklahoma -- sadly, and perhaps unsurprisingly -- is number two in the United States when it comes to teen pregnancy. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about an organization working to address our state's high teen-birth rate. Our guest is the Executive Director of the nonprofit Take Control Initiative (or TCI). Per its website, the TCI "is a program aimed at reducing the high rate of unplanned and teen pregnancies in the Tulsa area.

Americans are less and less in agreement these days -- polarization, as we all know, has become a buzzword...and an omnipresent reality. But if there's one thing everyone agree on, it's that Washington, DC, is broken. How can it be fixed? Our guest is Joseph A. Califano, Jr., who spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet.

On this edition of ST, we learn about "Four Chords and a Gun," a newly created non-musical play that looks at the iconic punk band known as The Ramones -- and in particular, at their efforts to record an album with the eccentric yet legendary music producer, Phil Spector. The play was written by John Ross Bowie, an actor best known for his roles on TV's "Speechless" and "The Big Bang Theory." As we learn on today's show, "Four Chords and a Gun" focuses on the years 1979 and 1980, when The Ramones stood on the very edge of breaking into stardom.

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Nigerian military officials say they rescued 76 schoolgirls and recovered the bodies of two other students who went missing after an alleged attack by Boko Haram insurgents, according to Reuters.

"Everybody is celebrating their coming with songs and praises to God almighty," Babagana Umar, one of the parents whose daughter had disappeared, told the news wire service.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Back in October 2017, women took to social media to share their experiences of sexual harassment. The #MeToo movement was born and quickly went viral, spurring a national and global discussion on the issue.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The U.S. Supreme Court began churning out opinions Wednesday, producing four decisions — as many as the justices have produced over the past 4 1/2 months combined.

The topics were varied, touching on subjects ranging from gun control to whistleblower protection and terrorism.

A "muddle" on guns?

In a week highlighted by the national gun control debate, the court ruled that a North Carolina man who pleaded guilty to illegal firearm possession may still appeal his conviction on constitutional grounds.

In the seven days that have followed the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people, students from the Florida campus have moved from terror to grief to activism, inspiring a national youth-led protest against political inaction on gun reform.

On Wednesday, the Parkland students — still mourning and fueled by anger — made their way to the state capitol in Tallahassee to confront lawmakers to demand a ban on assault weapons.

Biathlon links two things that don't often go together, at least in the United States: cross-country skiing and rifle shooting. It's the only Winter Olympic sport in which the U.S. has never medaled.

Kemp Concert Series

First Presbyterian Church

When U.S. long track speedskaters Heather Bergsma, Brittany Bowe, Mia Manganello and Carlijn Schoutens won bronze Wednesday in the team pursuit event, they broke a Team USA drought. It was the first long track Olympic medal since the Vancouver Games of 2010.

Donald Trump Jr. says he was impressed by the poor people of India.

During a visit to promote his family's luxury apartments, Trump Jr. had this to say in a television interview with the Indian channel CNBC-TV 18.

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