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Oklahoma Revenue Collections Continue to Plummet in January

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma's treasurer says overall receipts to the state treasury plummeted more than 13 percent in January compared to last year, spelling more bad news for the state's economy. Treasurer Ken Miller says the $150 million plunge in overall collections last month is the largest decline since he began tracking them in March 2010. Miller says collections from every major revenue stream in January were smaller than during January 2015, including income, sales and motor vehicl...
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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Officials at Alcohol Abuse Summit Focus on Underage Drinking

Three in four Oklahoma 12th graders have already had their first drink — or more. That’s a statistic cited by Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Commissioner Terri White at a public safety summit on alcohol abuse held by Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett. Alcohol abuse is a big problem in Oklahoma, which ranks sixth in the nation in alcohol-related deaths. It’s also a big problem in Tulsa County, which has a DUI rate 20 percent higher than the state average. White said...
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Zika May Not Spread In Saliva Or Urine, Health Officials Say

U.S. health experts cautioned Friday that the apparent discovery of the Zika virus in saliva and urine from people in Brazil does not necessarily mean the virus can be spread by more casual contact with infected people, such as through kissing."I think we need to be careful that don't we jump to any conclusions about transmissibility," Anthony Fauci, who leads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said during an interview on NPR's Morning Edition."When you find a virus or...
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StudioTulsa

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Kristen T. Oertel, the Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century American History here at TU.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with the saxophonist, composer, and music educator Clark Gibson, who took the helm as Director of Jazz Studies at NSU in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, last fall. Gibson relocated to our community from Illinois, and his new CD, just out, is a terrific recording that grew out of the work he did while completing his doctorate at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. That disc is "Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements," and it's on the Chicago-based Blujazz label.

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On the Next All This Jazz...Recorded in 1966: Jazz Albums of Fifty Years Ago

Listen for the next All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 6th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM...and online via live stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org. Our program delivers three hours of modern/recent/classic jazz, across a range of styles, each and every Saturday night -- from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.) From Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, John Aberc...
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A major natural gas storage well in Southern California is still leaking, though less so than back in late October, when the giant gas leak was first reported. More than 5,000 families and two schools have been relocated since then, and the local utility that operates the facility is now facing several legal actions.

In its ongoing effort to combat violent extremism, Twitter announced Friday that it has suspended more than 125,000 accounts since mid-2015 because of what it called their connections to terrorist or extremist groups, primarily ISIS.

NPR's Aarti Shahani reports that the company says there is no "magic algorithm" to identify terrorist content on the Internet, so they're forced to make make challenging judgment calls based on "very limited information and guidance."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

News services say at least three people, including a baby and a 40-year-old man, have been killed in an earthquake in Taiwan.

A magnitude 6.4 quake shook the southern city of Tainan just before 4 a.m. local time Saturday. The shallow quake caused multiple structures to collapse, including one residential building where it is thought hundreds live.

NPR's Elise Hu, in Taiwan, tells All Things Considered that the residential building of most concern was 17 stories tall but collapsed down to the height of about four stories.

The Jordanian movie Theeb has been nominated for a best foreign language film Oscar. It's a beautiful, sweeping story set in 1916 in an area of western Saudi Arabia then known as the Hejaz. The film's director, Naji Abu Nowar, says Theeb covers a pivotal moment in the region's history.

"The First World War is kicking off ... and the war is coming toward this area of Hejaz," he tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "The British are ... inciting the Arab tribes to revolt against the Ottoman imperialists. And so you're on the brink of a massive change."

On Friday's All Things Considered, I have a story about how a recent federal court ruling is restricting when police are may use Tasers in the five Southeastern states covered by the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. In a nutshell, police there may no longer shock a nonviolent, noncooperative suspect with a Taser stun gun— even if he is trying to escape custody.

The new movie, Rams, has absolutely nothing to do with Peyton Manning. It's a story from Iceland that involves sheep, snow, a herd-afflicting virus called scrapie, and sufficient sibling rivalry to power a Greek tragedy.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Three in four Oklahoma 12th graders have already had their first drink — or more.

That’s a statistic cited by Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Commissioner Terri White at a public safety summit on alcohol abuse held by Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett.

Alcohol abuse is a big problem in Oklahoma, which ranks sixth in the nation in alcohol-related deaths. It’s also a big problem in Tulsa County, which has a DUI rate 20 percent higher than the state average.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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