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'A Cold Rain is a Comin' for the Tulsa Metro

It will be a very soggy and cold Thanksgiving weekend across Oklahoma and adjacent states: The Green Area (that includes Tulsa) is covered by a Flash Flood Watch. The Weather Service advises between 4-and-8 inches of rain will be likely.The Purple Area (western Oklahoma) is covered by an Ice Storm Warning. Forecasters are predicting over a quarter inch or more of ice.The Pink Area (northwest of Tulsa in Kansas) is covered by a Winter Storm Warning. Forecasters are predicting a quarter inch...
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Man Arrested for Starting House Fire where Body was Found

NEWALLA, Okla. (AP) — Cleveland County authorities have arrested a man for arson in connection with a mobile home fire near Newalla where a woman's body was found. Sheriff's spokeswoman Meghan McCormick said Wednesday that 31-year-old Cody Wayne Fish was arrested shortly after the Monday night fire about a mile from the mobile home and is being held on an arson complaint. McCormick said investigators have been told Fish lived in the mobile home. The woman's body was found after firefighters...
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Many Health Co-Ops Fold, Others Survive Startup Struggles

Thousands of Americans are again searching for health insurance after losing it for 2016. That's partly because some large, low-cost insurers — health cooperatives, set up under the Affordable Care Act — are folding in a dozen states.The startups were supposed to shake up the traditional marketplace by being member-owned and nonprofit. But it was tough to figure out how much to charge. Plans available through the co-ops tended to be priced low, and customers poured in.Yet many of these new...
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Thanksgiving Buzz: What Would Pilgrims Say About The Plight Of Bees?

Got cranberries? How about squash and pumpkin pie? These favorites would not be as bountiful without bees and other wild pollinators.Honey bees were first imported into the American colonies by early European settlers, who recognized their value in producing fruits and other crops."Some of the colonists who arrived at Plymouth likely brought bees," according to Tom Turpin, a professor of entomology at Purdue University.Today, an estimated one in three bites of food we eat come from crops...
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How long has atheism been a part of human experience? Most people today regard the sustained, intellectually rigorous adherence to non-religion as an invention of the European Enlightenment -- or, more recently, of modernity. But as our guest argues on this edition of ST, atheism is actually -- like so many other aspects of Western life and culture -- a phenomenon with origins in the societies of the ancient Mediterranean.

On this edition of ST, with the holiday season just around the corner, we check in with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl, for some page-turning, gift-giving tips. A well-known librarian -- now retired -- who began appearing on our show back when she lived in Tulsa in the early 1990s, Nancy is also a bestselling author, literary critic, and book editor.

(Note: This interview originally aired in June of this year.) On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an entertaining conversation with the celebrated British choral composer and conductor, Bob Chilcott, who sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, as both a boy and a university student. Known for his compositions for children's choirs and other vocal groups, Chilcott has worked in a wide array of musical settings; he's been composing music of his own since 1997.

On this edition of our show, we get to know the novelist and short story writer Jennifer duBois, who teaches in the MFA program at Texas State University. Her first novel, "A Partial History of Lost Causes," was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction, and her second, "Cartwheel," won the Housatonic Book Award for Fiction and was a finalist for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Award. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a former Stanford University Stegner Fellow, duBois is also the recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award.

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How To Talk To Kids About Thanksgiving

You know the drill: Trace your hand, then add the details. Two feet, a beak, a single eyeball. Color it in, and voila! Hand becomes turkey.You know the rest too: The Pilgrims fled England and landed on Plymouth Rock. The native people there, the Wampanoag, taught them to farm the land. In 1621, they sat down together for a thanksgiving feast, and we've been celebrating it ever since.It's a lesson many remember from childhood, but the story has some problems.There is evidence, in the form of a...
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Breaking The Cranberry Mold: New Ways To Savor This Seasonal Berry

The New England area where the Pilgrims first settled is cranberry country.These early colonists likely enjoyed a version of cranberry sauce on their autumn tables — though it probably took the form of a rough, savory compote, rather than the sweet spin we're most familiar with.For ideas on using this bitter red berry of the season in new ways this Thanksgiving, NPR Morning Edition's Renee Montagne turned to Chris Kimball, founder of America's Test Kitchen.Here are his tips for going beyond...
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For high school students looking to choose a college, grade point averages and test scores may weigh heavy on their minds. But campus atmosphere may not be far behind given recent demonstrations on college campuses across the country.

Students at the University of Missouri's flagship campus in Columbia were the forefront of a wave of protests over racist incidents and the reaction of school officials. For some high school students, those protests make racial relations factor highly in their college search.

Urban foraging might call to mind images of hipsters picking food out of the trash, one group in Massachusetts eats only the finest, freshest produce. The League of Urban Canners harvests fruit from trees in Cambridge and Somerville and turns it into jam.

Sam Christy, a local high school teacher, started the League four years ago.

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This time of year we tend to do a lot of writing about food. Usually we describe delicious dishes that remind us of home and our favorite family traditions, but there's something missing from that conversation: the tale of the kitchen disaster, the wreck, the unsalvageable mess for which the only remedy is take-out.

To fully appreciate the special anguish that is a home-cooked meal gone wrong, we've asked three people with particular knowledge in this area to tell us about their worst-ever kitchen debacles.

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When his cellphone rang Friday night, on Nov. 13, Joel Touitou Laloux didn't answer. The sun had long since set, the Jewish Sabbath was under way, and he doesn't use electronics on Shabbat.

He recognized the number. One of his sons was calling from Paris. Laloux, who managed the Bataclan theater for decades until he and his family sold it in September, now lives in Ashdod, a coastal city in southern Israel.

Finally, after his son's number flashed three or four times, Laloux answered.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

A new report by UNICEF warns that the number of child brides in Africa could more than double to 310 million in the next 35 years.

Though the rates of child marriage are on the decline in most parts of the world, the number of girls married as children in Africa is expected to increase by 250 percent by the year 2050.

At that point Africa would surpass South Asia as the region of the world with the largest number of young women who were married before their 18th birthday, the report says.

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