Matt Trotter / KWGS

Workers Return to Broken Arrow Blue Bell Plant

Blue Bell’s Broken Arrow production plant will be running again soon. The company announced about 70 percent of the plant’s 200 workers are back at work, with the rest expected to return next week. "My favorite food is ice cream, so I'm excited about it, but I think a lot of people are really excited about the fact it is a big part of our community," said Broken Arrow Mayor Craig Thurmond. "They really are a big contributor toward things that go on in our community." The plant should begin...
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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Parking Meters Pop Up in Brady Arts District

The City of Tulsa is testing new parking meters in the Brady Arts District, and you’ll have to pay starting Tuesday morning. There are will be a total of 21 solar-powered, automated pay stations. You’ll have to enter your car’s tag number, but then you can park in any legal space. Brady Arts District Business Association President Bob Fleischman said the goal is to encourage commerce by having available parking. "When someone wants to come by for lunch, we hope they can find a parking spot...
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StudioTulsa

A Vision-Funding Appeal to Expand and Refurbish the Tulsa Performing Arts Center

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing series of interviews with organizations vying to be included in the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. This extension is expected to go before voters in the spring of 2016, and over the past couple of months, many area organizations (from Gilcrease Museum to the Tulsa Zoo; from Tulsa Transit to Langston University) have been presenting proposals in this regard to the Tulsa City Council. We at StudioTulsa...
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How Are U.N. Climate Talks Like A Middle School? Cliques Rule

It seems to be part of human nature to want to belong to a group. People constantly form groups, in all kinds of situations, and high-stakes negotiations on climate change are no exception.Ever heard of the Umbrella Group? Or the Like-Minded Developing Countries? How about the Group of 77? (Here's a hint — it doesn't actually have 77 countries.)Delegates from nearly 200 countries are meeting in Bonn, Germany, this week to resume negotiations on a new global agreement to cut greenhouse gas...
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Wes Craven, Master Horror Movie Director, Dies At 76

Wes Craven, the legendary horror director behind the A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream franchises, has died at 76.His verified Twitter account posted about his death Sunday evening. The Associated Press reports that he had brain cancer and died in his Los Angeles home, according to a statement from his family.Craven's early life didn't presage a career in horror films. He was raised in a fundamentalist Baptist household, and went to a Christian college — one where, he told the Los Angeles...
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Itzhak Perlman: Charting A Charismatic Career

When Itzhak Perlman was three years old, he asked his parents for a violin because he heard one on the radio. A year later he contracted polio, leaving his legs paralyzed but his determination undaunted.Americans first became aware of the young Tel Aviv native when he performed on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1958 at age 13. His teacher at Juilliard, Dorothy DeLay, knew that Perlman stood out. He was "on a kind of creative high that has never let up," she said.It wasn't long before Perlman's...
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We All Scream For Slower Melting Ice Cream

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Naked Bike Riders Photo-Bomb Wedding Photos

30 minutes ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The title tells all: Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World. Author Linda Hirshman's joint biography of the first and second woman to serve on the nation's highest court is a gossipy, funny, sometimes infuriating and moving tale of two women so similar and yet so different.

Sandra Day O'Connor, raised on a western ranch and a life-long Republican who cut her political teeth as majority leader of the Arizona Senate, was named to the Supreme Court by President Reagan in 1981.

Stories about how Amazon and Google want to deliver packages using drones have gotten a lot of attention. But in fact, some 1,300 businesses and individuals have already received permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to use drones for commercial purposes — everything from selling real estate to inspecting utility lines. But their operators are worried that recreational drone users who have been flying their vehicles near aircraft may spoil the party.

The viruses that cause the common cold are always lurking. But consider this: Even if we touch a doorknob or keyboard that's covered in cold germs from an infected person, we don't always catch the cold.

"Sometimes when we're exposed to viruses, we end up not getting sick," says Aric Prather, a psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who studies how our behaviors can influence our health.

In less than 24 hours, Valerie Davidson has 50 people coming to her house for dinner.

She had planned to catch and cook enough salmon for the main course. But early in the morning, Alaska opened the Kuskokwim River to commercial fishing, which means subsistence fishermen like her can't fish on it.

So Davidson and I are in her bright orange 1983 Chevy pickup stalking the "free fish" container where state biologists deposit their test catches after conducting studies after each high tide.

The greater sage grouse is a peculiar and distinctly Western bird. It's about the size of a chicken and about as adaptable as the dodo bird, which is to say it's not very adaptable at all — at least not in a human-driven time scale.

In biological terms, the greater sage grouse is perfectly adapted for its habitat: the rolling hills of knee-high silver scrub that's sometimes called the sagebrush sea. It's the oft-forgotten parts of the fast-changing West; The Big Empty, as settlers used to call it.

So if you add up all the college costs that students and parents probably didn't plan for — the stuff that isn't tuition and room and board, how big is that number? The National Retail Federation estimates that, this year, it will total $43 billion. That's a hard number to grasp so let's break it down to one family — mine.

With our daughter now beginning her fourth and hopefully final year in college, here's one thing I've learned: No matter how much you plan to spend, it won't cover everything. Not even close.

This has been a banner year for employees seeking greater paid parental leave.

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