Top Stories

US Supreme Court

U.S. Supreme Court To Take Up Indian Murder Case

The Supreme Court will hear Oklahoma's plea to reinstate the murder conviction and death sentence of an American Indian. The justices on Monday said they will review an appellate ruling that overturned the conviction and sentence of Patrick Dwayne Murphy. He claimed he should have been tried in federal, not state, court because he is a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and the crime occurred in Indian territory. The federal appeals court in Denver determined that the victim's body was...

Read More
Jessica Anzai-Twitter

Tulsa to San Diego Flight Forced to Make Emergency Landing

A non-stop flight from Tulsa to San Diego made a stop last night. In fact, it was an emergency stop at Albuquerque. Frontier Airlines flight 1839 left Tulsa about 9:30 last night but was later diverted to the New Mexico airport when pilots noticed a smoky smell in the cockpit. Oxygen masks did not drop from the ceiling. The passengers were rescheduled on other flights today. Frontier started the non-stop service just last month.

Read More

'I Don't Want To Leave My House': Santa Fe's Invisible Wounds

If this were a normal Monday morning, students at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, would be heading back to class. Instead, school is closed, its classrooms still a crime scene. The big question for investigators: How did a gunman walk into school Friday morning, killing 10 people and wounding 13? But Katelyn "Kayte" Alford and her 1,400 classmates struggle with a different question: How do we move on from this? Friday morning, Kayte (pronounced Katie), 18, thought her school was on...

Read More

StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out: "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this compelling and eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Nicole Washington, who has worked in the past as both an academic and community-based psychiatrist, and who's now on the staff at Family and Children's Services here in Tulsa. Dr. Washington also operates a private practice dedicated to helping high-level professionals deal with a variety of emotional and mental issues.

Our guest on ST is the best-selling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Bragg, who's known for his books "All Over but the Shoutin'" and "Ava's Man." His new book, which he tells us about, is "The Best Cook in the World." In this work, Bragg sets out to preserve his heritage as well as his family history by telling the stories that framed his mother's cooking, her upbringing, her education, her child-rearing, and so forth -- from her own childhood into old age. As Bragg tell us, in the American South just like everywhere else, good food always has a good story behind it.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the remarkable Blondy Baruti, who grew up in a war-ravaged part of Africa, then came to the U.S. in order to become a professional basketballer, and actually ended up as a Hollywood movie star. And along the way, of course, he also played hoops at and attended the University of Tulsa. Baruti has a new autobiography out, which has been thus praised by Booklist: "What shines through here is Baruti's good heart, persistence, and absolute unwillingness to give up on his dreams despite repeated setbacks.

The Arena District in downtown Tulsa can seem, at times, like the heart of the city -- like when there's a big show at the BOK Center, or a large convention at the Cox Convention Center. At other times...it's pretty quiet. So, one key question is how best to turn a limited-use area into a thriving year-round destination. This matter is now being explored by the City of Tulsa's Master Planning Process; it's a process that's being underway for months now.

More StudioTulsa

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

In the early days of the Iraq war troops were riding around in Humvees with almost no armor on them. There was a scandal about it, and within a few years the trucks got up-armored with thick steel plates. Which solved one problem but created another.

"Some genius thought about up-armoring. Good! But they didn't do anything with the brake systems," says George Wilmot, who was riding an armored Humvee in 2009, leaving a hill-top base in Mosul.

"We took some small arms fire ... my driver took us off a cliff," says Wilmot.

Three days after a shooting at a Texas high school took the lives of eight students and two teachers, a town and a country are trying to figure out what comes next.

Gov. Greg Abbott called for a moment of silence across Texas at 10 a.m. local time, to honor the memory of those who died in Friday's violence in the city of 12,000 between Houston and Galveston.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in is in Washington to meet with President Trump, as plans for a high-stakes summit next month between the U.S. president and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hit some turbulence.

With North Korea's threats to back away from the talks, South Korea's leader — who has long favored engagement rather than confrontation with Pyongyang — is having to do some diplomacy to keep both the U.S. and North Korea interested in talking.

"Does this bread taste the same as it would taste as if a Pole had baked it?" asks Salam Salti. He is wearing a white apron and a baker's cap with his name on it.

Lava from the Kilauea volcano is pouring into the Pacific Ocean off of Hawaii's Big Island, generating a plume of "laze" – which Hawaii County officials describe as hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles — into the air. Officials say it's one more reason to avoid the area.

"Health hazards of laze include lung damage, and eye and skin irritation," says the Hawaii County Civil Defense agency. "Be aware that the laze plume travels with the wind and can change direction without warning."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

About 5 a.m. on Saturday, a police department in Ohio got an unusual call. A man reported that he was being followed home by a pig.

In a case involving the rights of tens of millions of private-sector employees, the U.S. Supreme Court, by a 5-4 vote, delivered a major blow to workers, ruling for the first time that workers may not band together to challenge violations of federal labor laws.

Pages