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Tulsa Fire Department

Tulsa City Council Working to Extinguish Problem With False Fire Alarms

Tulsa City Council is working on an ordinance to make repeated false fire alarms a misdemeanor offense. "It’s causing an issue with our fire department because you take one unit out of service to take a response for a false alarm, then another station is having to take those calls for that truck that’s making that false alarm call," said City Councilor Karen Gilbert. Tulsa Fire Department responded to nearly 5,000 false alarm calls last year, many caused by businesses' improperly maintained...

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Citing Constituents' Marijuana Concerns, Lawmaker Wants to Raise the Bar for Initiative Petitions

Oklahomans may be asked to vote on making it harder to get citizens’ proposals on a ballot. Rep. John Enns said he introduced House Bill 1603 because his rural constituents feel like their voices are being drowned out by the state’s population centers. "It switches the signatures from being a statewide deal to a countywide deal. So, every county you have to get the 15 percent signatures," Enns said. Constitutional amendments require the support of 15 percent of legal voters to get on a ballot...

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Now On Immigration's Front Lines, Sheriffs Are Choosing To Back Or Snub ICE

Anytime someone is booked into a county jail for a crime in the U.S., his or her fingerprints are automatically sent to federal authorities. If the suspect happens to be an undocumented immigrant, what happens next could depend on where the jail is located. Immigration and Customs Enforcement often asks jails to hold undocumented people, so federal agents can pick them up and put them into deportation proceedings. Most counties comply with those detainer requests. And the Trump administration...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we sit down with Todd Clouser and Chris Combs, two genre-busting guitarists and composers whose ever-creative music-making mixes jazz, rock, and funk styles -- as well as electronica, ambient grooves, and even tape-reversing experimentation. Clouser, originally from Minnesota and based in Mexico City, pretty much tours and performs worldwide -- and non-stop -- and has been occasionally playing shows in Tulsa for years now.

On this broadcast of ST, we chat with Laura Skoch, a Visiting Faculty Member with the Theatre Department here at The University of Tulsa. She's directing the new TU Theatre production of George Orwell's "1984," which opens tonight (the 22nd) in Kendall Hall on the TU campus and runs through the 25th. As Skoch relates during our interview, this decidedly multi-media play, like Orwell's classic novel, is mainly about how people seek out both meaning and hope in a world of lies, suppression, fear, and distortion.

Louis Lamone, Photographer; Bill Scovill and Norman Rockwell, ca 1962; Inkjet print, Norman Rockwell Collection, ©1962 Norman Rockwell Family Agency.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a new exhibition at Gilcrease Museum; "Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera" is the first exhibition to explore in depth the famous illustrator's richly detailed study photographs, which he used, quite carefully, as reference points for his iconic paintings.

Our guest is the writer and writing teacher Brandon Hobson, whose new novel, "Where the Dead Sit Talking," has just been published. Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, it's a spare, lyrical, and at times troubling story about a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy who's been placed in foster care. As was noted of this book in a starred Publishers Weekly review: "Hobson's narrative control is stunning....

Oklahoma -- sadly, and perhaps unsurprisingly -- is number two in the United States when it comes to teen pregnancy. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about an organization working to address our state's high teen-birth rate. Our guest is the Executive Director of the nonprofit Take Control Initiative (or TCI). Per its website, the TCI "is a program aimed at reducing the high rate of unplanned and teen pregnancies in the Tulsa area.

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The Trump administration is tightening the rules for companies that contract out high-skilled workers who are in this country on H-1B visas.

Newly released tapes and logs of 911 calls show that police had responded to at least two dozen incidents of violent or disruptive behavior over 10 years by the 19-year-old suspect in the fatal shootings of 17 students and staff at a Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week.

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

The White House went on lockdown for a while on Friday afternoon after a female driver struck a nearby security barrier and was "immediately apprehended" by officers, according to the Secret Service.

The agency said in a statement it has had "previous encounters" with the woman they say is 35, white and from LaVergne, Tenn. The statement said she has been charged with "numerous criminal violations," and turned over to Washington, D.C., police.

Nearly four months after their billionaire owner shut them down, local news sites Gothamist, LAist and DCist will come back to life under new ownership: public radio stations.

WNYC in New York will buy Gothamist, Southern California's KPCC will acquire LAist, and WAMU in Washington, D.C., is taking over DCist.

This winter, the Syrian government regained control over the entire city of Aleppo. For years before that, it was the largest urban stronghold of anti-regime rebels. Over those years, there were countless government bombings, and the city was reduced to rubble.

The documentary Last Men In Aleppo, by Syrian filmmaker Feras Fayyad, takes viewers inside the city. "I grew up in the countryside of Aleppo," he says. "And Aleppo — it's my city, where I know every single street and every single store."

The Seychelles have brokered a novel deal that will allow the island archipelago to swap millions of dollars in sovereign debt for protecting nearly one third of its ocean area.

It's hailed as the first of its kind. "Seychelles is clearly breaking new grounds and with it, it has positioned itself as a world leader in ocean governance and management," Seychelles vice president Vincent Meriton said in remarks announcing the new protections.

Last fall, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration started looking for dangerous bacteria in a few of America's most beloved fresh foods: parsley, cilantro, basil, and prepared guacamole. The very freshness of these foods carries a risk. Since they aren't normally cooked, they may harbor nasty bugs like salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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