City of Tulsa

Six More Weeks of Vision — Tulsa Sets Proposal Cutoff, City and County Rates

There are six weeks left to submit Vision proposals to the City of Tulsa. Councilors have agreed on Sept. 10 as the cutoff date for accepting ideas. "We're really looking at an end of 2015 deadline for us to have the package ready to present, and we know we're going to need to give the engineers and the finance guys a couple of months to look through what we've put together and really help us to make sure our numbers are right," said Vision task force Co-chair Blake Ewing. Ewing said city...
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Indian Cultural Museum

Museum a LONG Way from Being Finished

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) _ Officials estimate that construction on the planned American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City is still at least two years away from being finished. An Oklahoma City Council committee on Tuesday also concluded that another year will be needed to install Smithsonian Institution-quality exhibits. City Manager Jim Couch says $90 million of the original $170 million project budget already has been spent, leaving an $80 million gap. The state has offered to...
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StudioTulsa

Renowned Bartlesville-Based Storyteller Fran Stallings Describes Her Two Newest Books

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with Fran Stallings, a longtime storyteller who has performed at numerous national and international storytelling festivals, in schools and libraries, and on the radio. Stallings has two new books out, which she tells us about: "How to Fool a Cat: Japanese Folktales for Children" and "The Price of Three Stories: Rare Folktales from Japan." In each of these collections, Stallings has edited and adapted the stories of her friend and collaborator,...
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Google Street View

EPA to Study Oklahoma's Rivers, Lakes and Streams

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) _ The condition of Oklahoma's wetlands is being analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Oklahoma Secretary of Energy and Environment as part of a national initiative. The assessment will help the two agencies monitor and analyze wetland conditions in the state. The environment secretary will use a $131,575 grant from the EPA to produce a wetlands status report and implement a wetlands monitoring program. The Clean Water Act recognizes the dangers of...
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Egypt Postpones Verdict In Trial Of Al Jazeera Journalists

A court in Egypt has delayed reading the verdict in the retrial of three Al Jazeera journalists accused of aiding a terrorist organization.The BBC reports:"Canadian-Egyptian Mohamed Fahmy, Egyptian Baher Mohamed and Australian Peter Greste were sentenced to up to 10 years in prison in June 2014."Their convictions for spreading false news were overturned on appeal and they were released on bail in February. ..."Mr Greste, who was deported to Australia and was due to be tried in absentia, said...
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Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

Over the years, scientists have mostly interpreted the world through what they can see. But in the past few decades, a culture of listening has blossomed, especially among biologists who seek to understand how animals communicate. This week Morning Edition embarks on a weekly summer series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound. We begin with an innovation that transformed medicine by searching sounds for clues to illness and health.Microscopes illuminate the invisibly tiny;...
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True, I never basked in the glow of the high school stage. But I have fond memories of working behind the scenes, as stage crew. Dressed in black, I rushed the bed onstage for Tevye's dream sequence in Fiddler on the Roof.

I've also spoken with many people who weren't involved in theater at all but can still — for some reason — remember the shows their schools performed.

There's just something about the high school stage.

Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei says he was denied a six-month visa to the U.K. because British officials said he didn't list a criminal conviction on his application.

Ai applied for the six-month business visa, but was instead restricted to a 20-day travel visa from Sept. 9-29.

American college campuses are increasingly patrolled by armed police officers — and it's a trend that burst into public view Wednesday, when a University of Cincinnati officer was charged with murder in the shooting death of a black motorist during a traffic stop. But this arming of college cops is causing some worries.

When prosecutor Joe Deters announced the indictment of University of Cincinnati Officer Ray Tensing on Wednesday, he had harsh words about the officer's competence, saying he should never have been a cop.

Usually, Beirut is one of the pleasanter places in the Middle East — a bright, cosmopolitan city squeezed between the Mediterranean Sea and a green ridge of mountains. But for the last two weeks or so, the stench from mounds of festering garbage has filled its gaudy streets.

"The trash is climbing up, the mountain is getting higher and higher," says one immaculately dressed, middle-aged woman with a perfect bouffant, wrinkling her nose. She wouldn't give her name because she criticizes powerful people — Lebanon's politicians, whom she holds responsible for the garbage crisis.

Chimpanzees are like us in many ways. They can cook, they enjoy a good drink here and there, they share about 95 percent of our DNA.

When it comes to getting the HPV vaccine to protect against cervical cancer, teens below the poverty line are doing better than the rest.

Among teenage girls ages 13 to 17 whose total family income was less than the federal poverty level for their family size, 67.2 percent have received the first dose of the human papillomavirus vaccine, compared to 57.7 percent for those at or above the poverty line. For teen boys, it's 51.6 percent compared to 39.5 percent.

Alvin Bailon and his wife were at their wits' end last September. Their 12-year-old son, an honors student, had begun having anxiety attacks, mostly about school. "And then all of a sudden he would slowly lose consciousness," Bailon recalls. "We term it as doze off. He would doze off and he would fall down slowly."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it is investigating Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer, a hunting enthusiast who has been identified as the person who illegally poached and then dismembered Zimbabwe's famous "Cecil the Lion."

But officials are asking the public for help in locating Palmer, who has apparently gone into hiding after his identity was made public and social media lit up with scorn and vitriol.

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