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Michael Willmus-Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma's Correction Crisis

Oklahoma's prison system director has told the state's prisons board that Oklahoma's prisons are in trouble. Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh says the system suffers from aging, low staffing, skyrocketing medical costs for aging inmates and no budget increases in the face of growing inmate populations and decreasing paroles. He told the Board of Corrections on Tuesday the day approaches when the system will "be incapable of taking more prisoners." The prisons are operating at...

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Pulaski County, Arkansas Booking Photo

Same Man Who Hit Oklahoma's Ten Commandments Monument Topples Arkansas'

A man yelled "Freedom!" as he crashed his vehicle into Arkansas' new Ten Commandments monument early Wednesday, nearly three years after he was arrested in the destruction of Oklahoma's monument at its state Capitol, authorities said. The privately-funded Arkansas monument had been in place outside the state Capitol in Little Rock for less than 24 hours before it was knocked from its plinth and smashed to pieces. Michael Tate Reed, 32, of Van Buren, Arkansas, was booked in the Pulaski County...

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Just 17 Percent Of Americans Approve Of Republican Senate Health Care Bill

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET Americans broadly disapprove of the Senate GOP's health care bill, and they're unhappy with how Republicans are handling the efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll . Just 17 percent of those surveyed say they approve of the Senate's health care plan, the Better Care Reconciliation Act. Fifty-five percent say they disapprove, while about a quarter said they hadn't heard enough about the proposal to have an...

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StudioTulsa

(Note: This interview originally aired in 2014.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis, who has written several well-regarded books on the events and persons concerning the founding of the United States. His fascinating book called "Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence" -- which he discusses with us today -- details two seminal events in the summer of 1776, both of them quite central to our nation's founding.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa; "Hope & Fear: Propaganda of the Great War" will be on view through November 12th. Our guests are the show's co-curators, Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Librarian/Archivist Thomas Young. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "To commemorate the 100th anniversary year of America's entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the Museum's permanent collection.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about (brace yourself) dirty diapers and the parents who fixate on them. Our guest is Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, which is America's largest children's hospital. He tells us about his new book, which reveals the many useful solutions that he's both utilized and developed over the course of his distinguished career in addressing the digestive health problems of children.

Our guest is Todd Cunningham, the Executive Director of Arts Alliance Tulsa, which is, per its website, "a United Arts Fund that strengthens and supports the arts for a greater Tulsa through fundraising, support services, audience development, and responsible investment and allocation of resources." Comprised of dozens of outstanding nonprofit arts groups from throughout the Tulsa area, Arts Alliance Tulsa has only been around for a couple of years now -- but its very presence highlights the important role that the arts play in our community'

Theatre Tulsa -- founded in 1922 -- is the longest-running local theatre west of the Mississippi River, and the seventh oldest in the United States. To mark its 95th anniversary, the company will present a special presentation this weekend at the Tulsa PAC. The show, featuring a cast of one hundred or more, is called "Local Landmark, National Treasure: An Epic Concert Celebrating 95 Years of Theatre Tulsa" -- and it will be staged June 23rd and 24th at 8pm, and then on the 25th at 2pm.

More StudioTulsa

Police in the Australian state of Victoria say they have charged Roman Catholic Cardinal George Pell with "historical sexual offenses." The Archdiocese of Sydney says Pell will return from Vatican City, where he is a top financial adviser to Pope Francis, to fight the charges.

Deputy Police Commissioner Shane Patton would not give reporters specifics of the charges against Pell but said there are "multiple complainants." He said the cardinal has been ordered to appear in court in Melbourne on July 18 for a hearing. Patton gave no further details.

An FBI agent assigned to the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon last year is facing a five-count indictment for allegedly lying about his role in the shooting death of one of the occupiers.

USA Gymnastics announced Tuesday that it will adopt all 70 of the recommendations in an independent review of its policies about reporting abuse. An investigation by The Indianapolis Star last year found that at least 368 gymnasts have alleged they were sexually assaulted by adults working in the sport.

A federal appeals court paved the way on Wednesday for Ohio to resume executions by lifting a lower court's decision to halt the state's lethal injection process.

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote.

In the case brought by death row inmates, the judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam, one of the three lethal injection drugs used by Ohio.

Boaty McBoatface is back.

And according to the British Antarctic Survey, the world's most famous unmanned submersible returned from its inaugural voyage last week with a trove of "unprecedented data about some of the coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Right now a world fair is going on in Kazakhstan, in the capital city of Astana. It has a grandiose architecture booth for more than a hundred countries, music, food. One thing it does not have is crowds.

Drive east from Washington and eventually you run smack into the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, the massive estuary that stretches from the mouth of the Susquehanna River at Maryland's northern tip and empties into the Atlantic 200 miles away near Norfolk, Va.

The Chesapeake is home to oysters, clams, and famous Maryland blue crab.

It's the largest estuary in the United States.

The Trump administration is expected Thursday to announce how it will implement its modified travel ban, following the Supreme Court's decision on Monday lifting a stay on the executive order imposed by two lower courts.

A founding father of France's nouvelle cuisine, Alain Senderens, died Sunday at the age of 77, reports The Associated Press.

"He was one of the last great creators of Paris," French food critic Gilles Pudlowski said, according to The Guardian. "This creator was a visionary."

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