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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Mon May 18, 2015

Obama To Limit Police Acquisition Of Some Military-Style Equipment

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 5:22 pm

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

President Obama said military-style equipment used by police departments "can alienate and intimidate local residents and send the wrong message," as he ended federal transfers of such weapons to local law enforcement.

Obama's remarks, made in Camden, N.J., are an attempt to ease tensions between police and minority communities in the wake of several high-profile police-involved shootings.

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Mon May 18, 2015

$1M Bond Set For Members Of Biker Gangs Linked To Waco, Texas, Shootout

Authorities investigate a shooting in the parking lot of the Twin Peaks restaurant on Sunday in Waco, Texas.
Jerry Larson AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 5:50 pm

Updated at 2:39 p.m. ET

Federal, state and local authorities are collecting evidence at the scene of a gunfight among five rival motorcycle gangs Sunday in Waco, Texas, that left nine people dead and 18 injured.

Officials said at least 170 people were arrested in connection with the gunfight at the Twin Peaks restaurant. Each is being held on a $1 million bond.

NPR's John Burnett tells our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
2:47 am
Mon May 18, 2015

In Seoul, Kerry Calls N. Korea Provocations 'Egregious,' 'Reckless'

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint news conference following meetings at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Seoul.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:52 am

Given the always-present tensions in this region, it's no surprise that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry's visit to Seoul on Monday was all about security.

"We are not seeking conflict, we are seeking a peaceful resolution of the differences that still exist after so many years on the peninsula," Kerry said.

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The Two-Way
12:09 am
Mon May 18, 2015

9 Dead After Shootout Between Rival Biker Gangs In Central Texas

Authorities investigate a shooting in the parking lot of the Twin Peaks restaurant Sunday in Waco, Texas. Authorities say the shootout victims were members of rival biker gangs that had gathered for a meeting.
Jerry Larson AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:34 pm

A brawl among as many as five rival motorcycle gangs turned deadly on Sunday in Waco, Texas. Nine bikers were killed and 18 injured at a popular sports bar frequented by the gangs. No bystanders or employees were hurt.

Waco police said trouble had been brewing at the Twin Peaks bar and grill for some time. Bikers had been congregating there in ever-increasing numbers, and there had been more and more arrests for fights and weapons. Authorities had intelligence that there was a high potential for violence on Sunday. And they were right.

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The Two-Way
4:31 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Amtrak To Restore Service Between Philadelphia And New York

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:01 pm

Updated at 7 p.m. EDT

Amtrak will be restoring rail service between Philadelphia and New York at 5:30 Monday morning, the rail service announced Sunday.

Service between the two cities had been shut down since Tuesday, when train 188 derailed in Philadelphia, killing eight and wounding more than 200.

The affected section of track is part of the Northeast Corridor — the busiest railroad in America.

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Indonesian Military Chief Defends 'Virginity Tests' For Female Recruits

Female soldiers perform martial arts at a ceremony in Jakarta. Women in Indonesia must undergo an invasive "virginity test" to join the military.
Agung Kuncahya B. Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:26 am

Indonesia's top military commander defended a requirement that female recruits undergo an invasive "virginity test" to determine whether they are morally suited for the armed forces. His remarks follow a letter from Human Rights Watch condemning the practice.

"So what's the problem? It's a good thing, so why criticize it?" Gen. Moeldoko was quoted by The Jakarta Globe as telling reporters on Friday.

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Islamic State Claims Capture Of Iraqi City Of Ramadi

Displaced Iraqis from Ramadi rest before crossing the Bzebiz bridge as they flee toward Baghdad on Saturday.
Hadi Mizban AP

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 11:06 pm

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

The self-declared Islamic State claims its fighters have seized Ramadi in Iraq's western Anbar province, even as Iraqi officials disagreed on whether the city was lost and Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi ordered Shiite militias not to abandon their positions.

In a statement, the extremist group said it seized tanks and killed "dozens of apostates," referring to Iraqi security forces, according to Reuters. A spokesman for the governor of Anbar province also said the city had fallen to ISIS.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

20 Years After China Seized Boy Monk, Tibetans Call For His Release

Members of Exile Tibetan Women Association protest to demand the immediate release of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, the 11th Panchen Lama, during a gathering to mark the 20th anniversary of his disappearance, in New Delhi, India, on Sunday.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Two decades after a 6-year-old boy designated as Tibetan Buddhism's second most important spiritual leader was swept up by Chinese authorities and never heard from again, the Dalai Lama's government-in-exile has renewed a call for his release.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Sun May 17, 2015

Asia's Governments Talk As Desperate Rohingyas Wait At Sea

Migrants as their boat is towed away by a Thai navy vessel, in waters near Koh Lipe island, on Saturday. Thousands of Rohingya and Bangladeshis have been turned away by Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 2:34 pm

At least 1,000 desperate Rohingya migrants from Myanmar remain stranded on boats in the Andaman Sea with little food or water as the nations of Southeast Asia seem no closer to resolving the problem of where — or even whether — they will come ashore.

As Michael Sullivan reports from Thailand, the region's countries have begun leaning on Myanmar to take action to stop the flow.

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