Technology

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

On this edition of ST, we speak with journalist and editor Rick Tetzeli, who's the executive editor of Fast Company -- and who's also the co-author, with Brent Schlender, of "Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader." This newly released biography is, as was noted by a book critic for Business Insider, "detailed and thorough....

On this edition of ST, we welcome Roger Mailler, an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Tulsa. Mailler tells all about a big event that's organizing here in Tulsa; it's the third-annual Heartland Gaming Expo, happening this coming weekend (April 10th through the 12th) at the Cox Business Center in downtown Tulsa. As noted of this event at its website, the Heartland Gaming Expo "invites computer gaming enthusiasts of all ages to explore the industry’s products, designs, and latest technology.

Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, our Facebook pages, our email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- or, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled in her new book, "The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World," which she discusses with us today.

On Tuesday, March 3rd, the citizens of Tulsa will vote on a $415 million bond for Tulsa Public Schools. This bond -- which would not raise taxes -- is focused on four areas: facilities and classrooms, books and classroom technology, transportation, and libraries. As we learn on today's show, the bond is part of TPS's 20-year capital improvement plan to transform and expand aging facilities while also making schools safer throughout the district.

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

On this installment of ST, a fascinating chat about historic preservation -- how it works, how it's changed over the years, and how we learn so much from it -- with Fenella France, who's the Chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress. She's also worked for the Smithsonian Institution and the National Park Service, and from 2001 to 2007, she was the project and scientific manager for Art Preservation Services in New York.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

Our guest is Luke A. Nichter, an Associate Professor of History at Texas A&M University: Central Texas, and a noted expert on the Nixon tapes. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 4th at 7pm, TU's Oklahoma Center for the Humanities and Book Smart Tulsa will co-present a free-to-the-public lecture by Professor Nichter on "The Nixon Tapes: 40 Years Later." This event will happen in Kendall Hall on the TU campus -- not in TU's Tyrrell Hall, as was originally announced.

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