Technology

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Nathan Pritchett, executive director of Fab Lab Tulsa. This popular nonprofit, which opened in Tulsa (near 7th and Lewis) in 2011, offers, per its website, "community access to advanced manufacturing and digital fabrication tools for learning skills, developing inventions, creating businesses, and producing personalized products. Fab Lab Tulsa is one of over 700 MIT-chartered Fab Labs in more than 70 countries and the first in the southeastern region of the United States.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Scott Phillips, a Tulsa-based entrepreneur and innovator -- and avid "hacker" -- who was recognized as a "Champion of Change" in a 2013 ceremony at The White House.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Penn, a British writer and journalist whose books include, "It's All About the Bike," a bestselling memoir of craftsmanship. Penn joins us to speak out his new book, just out from W.W.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this edition of ST, we speak with P.W. Singer, who is a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation; the founder of NeoLuddite, a technology advisory firm; and the author of several award-winning books. Singer is widely considered a leading expert on trends and tactics in 21st-century warfare, and he'll be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight (Tuesday the 29th) on the TU campus. The talk is entitled "Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know," and it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

On this edition of ST, we speak with journalist and editor Rick Tetzeli, who's the executive editor of Fast Company -- and who's also the co-author, with Brent Schlender, of "Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader." This newly released biography is, as was noted by a book critic for Business Insider, "detailed and thorough....

On this edition of ST, we welcome Roger Mailler, an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Tulsa. Mailler tells all about a big event that's organizing here in Tulsa; it's the third-annual Heartland Gaming Expo, happening this coming weekend (April 10th through the 12th) at the Cox Business Center in downtown Tulsa. As noted of this event at its website, the Heartland Gaming Expo "invites computer gaming enthusiasts of all ages to explore the industry’s products, designs, and latest technology.

Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, our Facebook pages, our email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- or, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled in her new book, "The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World," which she discusses with us today.

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