The Slow Food Movement

Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a new book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" vividly documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat once again with Katie Plohocky, the founder and director of Tulsa's Healthy Community Store Initiative. This initiative is an umbrella for several programs that Plohocky runs, all of them focused on healthy eating, healthy living, and healthy communities -- these programs include R&G Grocers (Tulsa's mobile grocery store), Cooking for Health (a program that brings farm-fresh food and nutrition to at-risk populations), and a farm-to-table catering operation.

When did names like Fat Tire and Sam Adams become as familiar -- in certain circles -- as the names Bud, Miller, and Coors? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the craft beer movement (or should we say craze?) in America today -- how it began, why (and where) it has caught on, and how it relates to key concepts like race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Our guest is J. Nikol Beckham of Randolph College in Virginia, where she is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies specializing in such pop-culture fixtures as television, popular music, and food.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Philip Howard, a professor of community sustainability at Michigan State University. He's also president of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and is a member of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Michael Finkelstein, MD, the so-called "Slow Medicine Doctor," who's been featured in The New York Times, on CNN, at the Huffington Post website, and so forth, and whose recently issued paperback is "Slow Medicine: Hope and Healing for Chronic Illness." As Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Valarie Carter, a classically trained chef, food writer, wine columnist, and catering/events coordinator. She's also the editor of "Edible Tulsa," which is a newly launched bimonthly print publication (accessible online at this link) that celebrates the local food culture of our community and its surrounding environs. The magazine's tag line -- "Eating. Drinking. Thinking.