Science Journalism

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Richard Harris, a longtime science reporter at NPR, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions." As was noted of this alarming and well-regarded new book by Kirkus Reviews: "An award-winning science journalist reports that research in the biomedical sciences is too often guilty of wasting time and money and, worse than that, actually slowing scientific progress and misinforming the public.

If you grew up here in the Sooner State -- and if you are, as they say, of a certain age -- then you might well wonder where all the Texas horned lizards, or horned toads, or horny toads, have gone.... Whatever you call them, they used to be readily apparent all over these parts, or so it seemed -- but no longer. What happened? Our guest is Chad Love, a freelance writer and editor based in Woodward, Oklahoma.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we're discussing the cover story of the September 2017 issue of Consumer Reports: "Too Many Meds? America's Love Affair With Prescription Medication." Our guest is Lisa Gill, the deputy editor of Consumer Reports' ongoing prescription drug program, Best Buy Drugs. (For those not familiar: Consumer Reports is a non-profit, advertising-free, 80-year-old magazine...and now, website.) Just how hooked on meds are we Americans these days?

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting conversation with Dr. Justin Feinstein, who's a clinical neuropsychologist at Tulsa's Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) as well as an assistant professor of psychology in TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences. Dr. Feinstein also directors the "Float Clinic" at LIBR, which studies how and why floating in a foot or so of water -- to which has been added more than a ton of Epsom Salt -- can aid those who suffer from acute stress, high-level anxiety, PTSD, and similar afflictions.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) "The disappearing maternal care problem is common across rural America. Only about 6 percent of the nation's OB/GYNs work in rural areas, according to the latest survey numbers from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Yet 15 percent of the country's population, or 46 million people, live in rural America.

(Note: This program first aired in April.) On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of an engaging book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Richard Harris, a longtime science reporter at NPR, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions." As was noted of this alarming and well-regarded new book by Kirkus Reviews: "An award-winning science journalist reports that research in the biomedical sciences is too often guilty of wasting time and money and, worse than that, actually slowing scientific progress and misinforming the public.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion we first presented in January, when our guest was Helen Czerski, a physicist at University College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering as well as a science presenter for the BBC.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're joined by Elizabeth Rosenthal, formerly of The New York Times, who tells us about her widely acclaimed new book, "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back." This volume, which grew out of the "Paying Till It Hurts" series of healthcare columns that she wrote for the Times, was thus praised in a starred in Publishers Weekly: "Rosenthal, a New York Times senior writer and former physician, provocatively analyzes the U.S.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of a striking and engaging new book, "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we look back on the best and worst medical journalism of 2016 with Gary Schwitzer, the founder and publisher of the website HealthNewsReview.org. This website offers a daily appraisal of health-related reporting by major U.S. news outlets and organizations. Schwitzer has worked in various forms of health care journalism/communication for the past 40+ years; he knows this aspect of the medical world like no one else.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

What is meant by the term "placebo effect"? What exactly is being described, and how is it brought about? And is this term a medical reality? Does it actually -- that is, scientifically -- exist? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we hear from journalist Erik Vance, whose writing has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, Scientific American, and other publications.

(Note: This interview originally aired in late June.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum, who is a national correspondent for The New England Journal of Medicine. She joins us to talk about a three-part series of articles that she recently wrote for the Journal's Medicine & Society section; all three of these well-written, expertly researched pieces concern how we as a society -- and as medical professionals -- care for the mentally ill in the twenty-first century. The articles are entitled "Liberty vs.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Bret Stetka, a health, science, and medical writer who works as an Editorial Director for Medscape by WebMD, and who is also a contributor to both Scientific American and Shots (the NPR Health blog). Stetka talks about how and why he decided, after completing his med-school training, to pursue medical journalism rather than, say, some sort of doctoring or medical research.

(Note: This program originally aired back in April.) Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!

On this installment of ST, we speak with the corporate lawyer, conservation leader, and author Frederic C. Rich. His new book, just out, is called "Getting to Green" -- it argues for a new bipartisan coalition in American politics and culture in order to fix the ongoing (and basically nonfunctioning) mess that is the current Green Movement in the US.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown. He offers insight into both the scientific process and the sociology of science....

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Ariel Waldman, a San Francisco-based writer and science advocate who is a fellow at the Institute for the Future, a National Academy of Sciences committee member, and the founder of Spacehack.org (which is a directory of ways to participate in space exploration). Waldman joins us to talk about her new book: "What's It Like in Space? Stories from Astronauts Who've Been There." It's a fun-to-read collection -- written for parents and kids alike -- that gathers eyewitness stories from dozens of international astronauts.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!

On this installment of ST on Health, we listen back to fine show from the summer of 2014. At that time, guest host John Schumann spoke with Lauren Silverman, the Health, Science, and Technology Reporter at KERA, which is the NPR member-station in Dallas. Silverman -- as she tells us in detail -- helped to create an impressively researched and decidedly multimedia "digital storytelling project" at the KERA website dealing with hip fractures among the elderly, in both the Greater Dallas region and the United States more generally.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a provocative discussion with Fred Pearce, an award-winning author and journalist based in London who's reported on environmental, science, and development issues all over the planet for the past twenty years.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the novelist and writing instructor Eileen Pollack, whose books include the novels "Breaking and Entering" and "Paradise, New York," as well as two collections of short fiction and two creative-nonfiction textbooks. Her newest book is a memoir called "The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club," and it looks back on her challenging experiences as a young woman majoring in physics at Yale in the 1970s while also highlighting various issues that still plague women in science across the nation today.

On this installment of our show, an interesting and provocative discussion with Fred Pearce, an award-winning author and journalist based in London who's reported on environmental, science, and development issues all over the planet for the past twenty years. Pearce tells us about his new book, a critique of "the new ecology" entitled "The New Wild: Why Invasive Species Will Be Nature's Salvation." As he notes in this book's Introduction: "Rogue rats, predatory jellyfish, suffocating super-weeds, wild boar, snakehead fish wriggling across the land -- alien species are taking over.