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8:39 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Episode 463: How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:23 pm

It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see it every day and never give a second thought to. But in Yangon, Myanmar, an ATM is a small miracle.

For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one in the U.S. or Europe did business there.

But last year, when the international sanctions started to be lifted, companies like Visa and Mastercard were excited to come in. The country has about 50 million people — that's a lot of potential customers to pay ATM fees.

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What's New?
10:24 am
Tue June 4, 2013

What Did Rachel Carson Hear? The Mystery Of The 'Fairy Bell Ringer'

Bob Schutz AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 2:08 pm

This is the season of night noises, chirps, buzzes, little cries. The air is telling you, "Things are going on out here," and if you like you can step out onto the porch and do what the writer Rachel Carson did back in 1956: She played a hunting game. The rules were simple: You stand outdoors, near the house. You go quiet. When you hear something interesting, you either: a) take a flashlight and go hunt for it; or b) you don't go anywhere. You just imagine it.

The best find Rachel Carson ever made, she never found.

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What's New?
10:23 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Are Men's Ties Falling Out Of Summer Fashion?

The Patrik Ervell Fall 2012 collection showed suits without ties for New York Fashion Week.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 8:52 am

As thermometers start to creep up toward the triple digits, office menswear starts getting casual. It makes sense; having a thick ribbon tied around your neck in the sweltering heat is, by all accounts, a revolting experience.

Our very unscientific polling of the NPR newsroom revealed only 8 percent of men wear ties on hot, summer days. We wondered: Could we, humble fashion pioneers, be on the brink of a cutting-edge fashion trend?

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What's New?
10:23 am
Tue June 4, 2013

The French Learned To Make Wine From Italians 2,400 Years Ago

This French tapestry depicts noblemen and women treading and pressing grapes to make wine circa 1500. By then, the French had already been making wine for at least 2,000 years.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 11:38 am

The French weren't the first to make wine? Mon dieu! But as anyone who has sipped a Bordeaux, Champagne or Burgundy can tell you, the French got pretty good at it once they learned how. And thanks to some molecular archaeology, researchers can now confirm they picked up these skills as early as 425 B.C.

So who taught the French the art of viniculture? Probably the ancient Italians, says the man with perhaps the coolest nickname in science research — the "Indiana Jones of alcohol," Patrick McGovern.

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What's New?
10:21 am
Tue June 4, 2013

NPR Music Takes OK Go For A Ride

OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash belts lyrics from the band's song "All Is Not Lost" on the flat bed of a moving truck.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 4:36 pm

When life gives you moving crates, make wall art. Or a carpet-friendly bobsled. Or, even better, an epic music video.

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10:41 am
Tue May 28, 2013

When Ira Glass met Michael Jackson

Lead in text: 
Ira Glass, host of This American Life, recently received a medal from the Academy of Arts and letters. A portion of his talk revolved around a photo of Ira and Michael Jackson. See that photo and watch the humorous video of his acceptance of the award for spoken language.
What's New?
2:42 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Gay in the Eyes of God

Open any Torah, Bible or Koran, and the passages about homosexuality seem clear: being gay is an abomination; a sin; something that incurs the wrath of God. But for some, these interpretations are changing.  Gay in the Eyes of God, explores the ways in which the major American religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) grapple with acceptance of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. The program presents personal stories as well as interpretations of scripture and theology - both traditional and progressive.

What's New?
1:59 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

State of the Re: Union – Summer in Sanctuary –An Amercian Graduate Special

Every day in America, more than 7,000 students drop out of school. In a State of the Re:Union first, Summer in Sanctuary combines radio drama and documentary to explore America's dropout epidemic through the intimate story of one man's attempt to make a difference in the lives of a group of high-risk kids. Based on the celebrated off-Broadway show by SOTRU host Al Letson, this episode chronicles his journey teaching at a summer camp at the Sanctuary on 8th Street, a community center in an economically challenged neighborhood of Jacksonville, Florida.

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What's New?
11:26 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Climate One - Clean Money

The sun provides less than one percent of American electricity.  But there is a solar surge underway and the number of installations grew 75% in 2012.  Wind power is also on the upswing and it is happening in places you might not expect. 

What's New?
10:59 am
Mon April 22, 2013

KWGS and StateImpact Oklahoma Receive Society of Professional Journalists Awards

KWGS and StateImpact Oklahoma received seventeen awards from the Society of Professional Journalists Oklahoma Pro Chapter on Saturday, April 21, 2013.

John Durkee, KWGS News Director, won an award for best radio newscast and Catherine Roberts, KWGS Reporter, won a best radio portfolio award.

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