Poverty

We offer a chat with Donald MacDonald, a San Francisco-based architect with 40+ years of experience in architecture, planning, contract documents, and construction management. He was the major architect of the Bay Bridge's Eastern span, redesigned elements of the Golden Gate Bridge, and has designed bridges across the U.S. as well as internationally -- and he also, way back when, studied with famed architect Bruce Goff at the University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we speak with a big-thinking, fast-talking, highly motivated, and fairly progressive entrepreneur who's made and lost several fortunes: Bill Bartmann is best known as the founder and CEO of Commercial Financial Services (or CFS), a debt-collection company that actually treated its debtors with respect and fairness. CFS was based in Tulsa, operated from 1986 to 1999, and was for a time amazingly successful as a business --- but the fast-growing company fell apart amid charges of illegal stock trades and bogus debt sales.

What if a bright young guy who had enough brains, training, and ambition to thrive on Wall Street suddenly decided --- in his mid-twenties, while watching an especially "passionate" pianist perform at a concert --- to give up on all the money and glory associated with his fledgling career...in order to start a small, independent nonprofit dedicated to building schools in the world's poorest regions? On this edition of ST, we meet just such a person.

Efforts to end poverty around the world are many, various, and seemingly unending. Such efforts might also be, as they say, as old as the hills. ("You will always have the poor among you," as we read in the Book of Matthew.) But what about an especially business-savvy, marketing-driven approach to ending poverty? What if the needy were approached as customers --- and what if poverty-relief itself were approached as a bottom-line, profit-generating goal for investors and entrepreneurs across the board? Our guest on this installment of ST is Dr.

On this installment of ST, we welcome the founder and executive director of JustHope, which is a Tulsa-based non-governmental organization (or NGO): Leslie Penrose.

On this encore edition of ST, we speak with the Tulsa-based writer, consultant, and activist Ann Patton, who's published a biography of the late Father Dan Allen, a Catholic priest turned social activist who worked incessantly (and memorably) to combat poverty and promote equality in Tulsa in the 1960s and beyond. Father Dan is probably best known for creating the Tulsa-area social service agency, Neighbor for Neighbor, which is still around today.

On this edition of on our program, we revisit a show that first aired back in March, when we spoke by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Tulsa-based writer, consultant, and activist Ann Patton, who's just published a biography of the late (and legendary) Father Dan Allen, a Catholic priest turned social activist who worked incessantly (and memorably) to combat poverty and promote equality in Tulsa in the 1960s and beyond. Father Dan is probably best known for creating the Tulsa-area social service agency, Neighbor for Neighbor, which still exists today.

On this edition of our show, we discuss a newly created, two-generation program to move parents and their children beyond poverty: the Community Action Project of Tulsa's CareerAdvance initiative. Our guest is Anne Mosle, a Vice President at the Aspen Institute and the Executive Director of the its Ascend Program, which focuses on economic security for families. Mosle recently visited Tulsa in order to observe the CareerAdvance program (which has been funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the Inasmuch Foundation, and the Health Profession Opportunities Grant) firsthand.

Today on our program we speak by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor, who's just put out a new book (from the University of California Press) called "Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China's Great Urban Migration." Praised in Publishers Weekly as "a thorough and insightful examination of the gritty, arduous side of the Chinese economic miracle," this book profiles eight different migrant peasants in contemporary China --- an impossibly vast and rapidly changing country where, each year, some 200 million such migrants travel from the countr