Popular Culture

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

Our guest on this edition of ST is the well-regarded jazz trumpeter and vocalist Byron Stripling. He'll be appearing tonight and tomorrow night (the 8th and 9th) with the Signature Symphony at Tulsa Community College in a special "pops" concert created by Stripling himself. The show is called "The Roaring '20s and All That Jazz," and it will feature the music of Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, and other American music masters (and will be staged at the TCC Van Trease PACE).

On this episode of ST, we welcome Jared Johnson to the show. He's an active drummer on the Tulsa-area music scene as well as a drumset instructor at Northeastern State University. Jared gigs widely on the local scene, playing in all sorts of bands and musical settings, and mainly works as a jazz drummer.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, we chat with Michael Wallis, the best-selling Tulsa-based author of "Route 66" and "David Crockett" and many other books.

Our guest on this installment of ST is author Ladee Hubbard, who joins us to discuss her first novel, which is just out. It's called "The Talented Ribkins." It's a creative and widely acclaimed book about race, class, politics, and America itself...and it focus on, of all things, a family of super-heroes. And per a starred review of this novel by Kirkus: "Crafty and wistful.... Hubbard weaves this narrative with prodigious skill and compelling warmth. You anticipate a movie while wondering if any movie could do this fascinating family, well, justice.

(Note: This interview originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Alex Prud'homme, who is Julia Child's great-nephew as well as the co-author of her autobiography, "My Life in France" (which was adapted into the hit movie, "Julie & Julia"). Prud'homme joins us to discuss his book, "The French Chef in America: Julia Child's Second Act." In this work, per a critic for Booklist, "Prud'homme deftly chronicles the years after Julia Child left France and settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) On this installment of ST, the bestselling writer Jonathan Lethem is our guest. He's known for such celebrated novels as "Dissident Gardens," "The Fortress of Solitude," and "Motherless Brooklyn." He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is a gathering of nonfiction pieces. It's called "More Alive and Less Lonely: On Books and Writers," and it's an impressive collection of 50+ essays, some of them previously published and some newly written.

What can American motion pictures tell us about the American South, and what can the South tell us about the movies? Our guest is Robert Jackson, an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa; "Hope & Fear: Propaganda of the Great War" will be on view through November 12th. Our guests are the show's co-curators, Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Librarian/Archivist Thomas Young. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "To commemorate the 100th anniversary year of America's entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the Museum's permanent collection.

On this edition of ST, we chat with Michael Wallis, the best-selling Tulsa-based author of "Route 66" and "David Crockett" and many other books.

Lots of talk these days, as we all know, about "building that wall." But what about the borderwall that already exists between much of the U.S. and Mexico? And what about the cultures, events, art works, communities, and lives that are associated with this borderwall -- that is, with the various walls and fences running between these two countries? Our guest is Ronald Rael, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Architecture and Art Practice at the University of California, Berkeley.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that we first aired in January with John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa. At that time, Coward joined us to discuss his then-new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press." This book is a social, cultural, and pictorial history of how Native Americans were illustrated in the many and various magazines and newspapers that popped up all over the nation in the latter half of the 19th century.

On this installment of ST, the bestselling writer Jonathan Lethem is our guest. He's well-known for such celebrated novels as "Dissident Gardens," "The Fortress of Solitude," and "Motherless Brooklyn." He joins us to discuss his latest book, just out now, which is a gathering of nonfiction pieces. It's called "More Alive and Less Lonely: On Books and Writers." It's an impressive collection of 50+ essays, some of them previously published and some newly written.

On this edition of ST, a rather "wild ride" of a conversation with Charles Monroe-Kane, a producer and host for the long-running Wisconsin Public Radio program To the Best of Our Knowledge (which is heard locally on Public Radio 89.5 on Sunday mornings). Monroe-Kane has a new book out -- an autobiography that candidly reports on how he grew up with auditory hallucinations and bipolar disorder. It's a detailed yet breathless account that takes the reader from rural Ohio, to the Philippines, to Haiti, to Indiana, to San Francisco, to Alaska, to NYC, to Prague, and so forth.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this edition of ST, we welcome Ron Spigelman back to our show. He'll be the Guest Conductor for the next Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert, which happens tomorrow night (Saturday the 11th) at the Tulsa PAC. As we learn on today's show, it's a Pops evening that will celebrate Route 66 -- indeed, a wide-ranging multimedia presentation (in image, text, and music) that will offer everything from Kander and Ebb's "Chicago" to Aaron Copland's "Buckaroo Holiday," and from W.C. Handy's "St.

On this edition of our show, we welcome Dr. Roger Horowitz, author of "Kosher USA: How Coke Bacame Kosher and Other Tales of Modern Food." Dr. Horowitz will offer a free-to-the-public presentation about this book tomorrow night, Thursday the 2nd, at 7pm here in Tulsa. The event happens at Congregation B'nai Emunah, at 1719 South Owasso.

On this edition of ST, we welcome two curators from the Philbrook Museum of Art to our show. Catherine Whitney and Sarah Lees tell us about "Lusha Nelson Photographs: Celebrity, the Forgotten Man, and 1930s America," which will be on view through May 7th of this year.

Our guest is Helen Czerski, who is a physicist at University College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering as well as science presenter for the BBC. She chats with us about her new book, "Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "In this delightful pop science title, Czerski, a physicist at University College London, shows that understanding how the universe works requires little more than paying attention to patterns and figuring out increasingly refined ways to explain them.

"The Big Trail" -- a classic Western from 1930, and the first film in which John Wayne had a starring role -- was chosen in 2006 by the Library of Congress to be a part of the National Film Registry. And it was shot in a wide-screen format (rare for that time) by the legendary Hollywood director, Raoul Walsh. Just recently, it was announced that someone has donated to Gilcrease Museum a set of rare stereoscopic photographs that were taken on the set of this motion picture, which was actually filmed all over the West, from New Mexico to Utah to California.

Our guest today is Ken Busby, the CEO and executive director of the non-profit Route 66 Alliance, which is based here in Tulsa, and which is, per its website, "dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and enhancement of historic Route 66 -- past, present, and future." Formerly the director of the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa, Busby was asked to lead the "Mother Road"-focused organization in 2014; today, he brings us up to speed on the Route 66 Experience Museum, a large-scale development for which funds are still being raised and plans

"Come along now, Watson! The game is afoot!" On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing none other than Sherlock Holmes with the writer and editor Michael Sims, who is the author of (among other books) "The Story of Charlotte's Web," which both The Washington Post and The Boston Globe chose as a Best Book of the Year.

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

Last month, it was announced that the long-awaited Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture -- or OKPOP, as it's also called -- will be built and housed at 422 N. Main Street in downtown Tulsa, just across the street from the historic Cain's Ballroom. As Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) On this installment of ST, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Billy Collins back to our show. He is the winner of the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, and he'll be reading from his work at an event here in Tulsa on Saturday the 3rd at the downtown Central Library. (This event begins at 10:30am and is free to the public.) Known and loved by readers everywhere for his accessible, conversational, clearly rendered, and often witty poems, Collins has been called "the most popular poet in America" by The New York Times.

(Note: This program originally aired back in August.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the author and historian Nancy Isenberg, who is the T. Harry Williams Professor of American History at LSU, writes regularly for Salon.com, and was formerly on the History faculty here at The University of Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa-based, volunteer-run, non-profit Horton Records, which began about five years ago, and which aims to -- as noted on its website -- "provide support and tools for band management, promotion, booking, merchandising, and distribution in order to help local and regional musicians fulfill their artistic goals and further promote local and regional music on a broader scale.

When did names like Fat Tire and Sam Adams become as familiar -- in certain circles -- as the names Bud, Miller, and Coors? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the craft beer movement (or should we say craze?) in America today -- how it began, why (and where) it has caught on, and how it relates to key concepts like race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Our guest is J. Nikol Beckham of Randolph College in Virginia, where she is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies specializing in such pop-culture fixtures as television, popular music, and food.

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