Music

Tiny Desk Concerts
7:59 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Janet Feder: Tiny Desk Concert

Emily Bogle NPR

Janet Feder came to NPR with an infant guitar, the curiosity of a child and a wild imagination. The guitar was just a couple of months old — hand made for her by Los Angeles-based guitarist and teacher Miroslav Tadic. It's a nylon-string baritone electric! Its player is diminutive — barely taking up any space behind Bob Boilen's desk. Yet, if you look closely, you'll see the products of her immense curiosity and imagination. A small split ring (like the kind you put your keys on) holds a metal bead in place on the top E string near the sound hole.

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Music Interviews
5:58 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Janet Feder: An Avant-Garde Artist Takes A Real Risk

Janet Feder built a career on unusual instrumental guitar playing. Her new album, Songs With Words, will feature her singing for the first time.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 10:46 am

Janet Feder does things to her guitar.

"If I play the second string with nothing on it, it sounds like this," Feder says, plucking out a note. "Just a pure pitch."

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Music News
5:21 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Making A Home For John Coltrane's Legacy

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the Coltrane Home on a list of the 11 most endangered historic sites in the United States. Now, a group of fans and family has set out to restore it.
Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 6:12 pm

In 1964, John Coltrane moved from Queens, N.Y., to a brick ranch house on a 31/2 acre wooded lot in the quiet suburb of Dix Hills. This bucolic setting — 40 miles east of the city — is perhaps the last place you'd expect to find a musician creating the virtuosic jazz that Coltrane is famous for.

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Music Interviews
5:17 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Aboriginal Sounds On Vermont Streets

Michael "Tree" Sampson plays the didgeridoo on the streets of Burlington, Vt.
Kirk Carapezza for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 3:54 pm

Vermont: Land of maple syrup, ski slopes, covered bridges and snow-capped mountains. Few people would associate the Green Mountain State with the didgeridoo, a wind instrument native to Australia. Until they've heard Michael "Tree" Sampson, that is.

Sampson's a one-man band who performs daily on Church Street in downtown Burlington.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:02 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

A Musician And The Audition Of His Life

To audition for the BSO, percussionist Mike Tetreault was required to prepare musical excerpts from 50 pieces on nine different instruments, including timpani.
Sean Hagwell Mike Tetreault

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:18 pm

Earlier this year, classical percussionist Mike Tetreault walked onstage at Symphony Hall in Boston for the audition of a lifetime: The Boston Symphony Orchestra was looking for not just one but two new percussionists.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:05 am
Sat July 21, 2012

A Grand Soviet Symphony, By Way Of Brazil

Sergei Prokofiev (pictured) wrote a Fifth Symphony that has special resonance in Sao Paulo for conductor Marin Alsop.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 8:08 am

People keep asking me why I recorded Sergei Prokofiev's Fifth Symphony for my first CD release in my new post leading the Sao Paulo Symphony Orchestra. The simple answer is that it just felt right. But in thinking about it, I can now see many parallels — at least for me — between Prokofiev's music, the city of Sao Paulo and the country of Brazil.

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A Blog Supreme
6:11 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Around The Jazz Internet: July 20, 2012

Eddie Palmieri was named a 2013 NEA Jazz Master this week.
Juan L. Cruz Courtesy of the artist

Sorry for the radio silence. More activity soon. Until then:

  • The 2013 NEA Jazz Masters were announced: Eddie Palmieri (pictured), Lou Donaldson, Mose Allison and Lorraine Gordon. All receive $25,000 and will be honored in a January 2013 ceremony. Four is the fewest number of awardees since 2004, but the program was slated to be cut in the first place last year, so ...
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Kind of Blog: An Occasional KWGS Jazz Journal
1:52 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Welcome

Well, here we go. The journey of a thousand blog entries begins, I suppose, with a single cliched expression.

Welcome to Kind of Blog: An Occasional KWGS Jazz Journal. Of course, if this journal should actually survive for anything remotely near 1,000 entries, I'll be pleased as punch. Whoa, another cliche. Bear with me.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:49 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: July 20, 2012

"Sonochromatic cyborg" and artist Neil Harbisson — with the implanted device that converts color to sound — at his TED talk in Edinburgh last month.
James Duncan Davidson courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 4:58 pm

  • Remember the interview with "sonochromatic artist cyborg" Neil Harbisson? He was born without the ability to see any colors at all, but his prosthetic eyepiece translates color into sound — and he has started reinterpreting music visually through his new perceptions of color, as in his painting based on Mozart's "Queen of the Night" aria.
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Deceptive Cadence
10:58 am
Fri July 20, 2012

New Summer Festivals

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 11:50 am

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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