News of the classical, jazz, and XPoNential worlds

A Body, Transformed

Oct 6, 2015

The musician and multimedia artist Laurie Anderson has long made America one of her great themes; her panoptic, early '80s magnum opus was titled United States, and her work has shown enduring fascination, and disquiet, with the way our national culture conducts itself. But Habeas Corpus, a multimedia work and concert presented at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City Friday, Oct. 2 through Sunday, Oct. 4, was remarkable even by her own standards.

World Cafe Next: Darlingside

Oct 5, 2015

The New England folk band Darlingside, which was recently featured in World Cafe's preview of this year's Americana Music Festival, evolved from a larger group that formed when its members attended Williams College in Massachusetts.

Join us for the next broadcast of All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 3rd, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM...and online by way of our "Listen Live" stream at

Our program delivers three hours of modern jazz -- across a range of styles -- each and every Saturday night, from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.)

Glen Hansard On World Cafe

Oct 2, 2015

Stephen Sondheim is widely viewed as the greatest living composer in American musical theater. "Send in the Clowns," from the show A Little Night Music, may be his most famous work — and yet you might not recognize the song as reimagined for solo piano by Ethan Iverson of the band The Bad Plus.

Joe Lovano And Dave Holland On Piano Jazz

Oct 2, 2015

Saxophonist Joe Lovano and bassist Dave Holland first recorded together in 1992 on the album From The Soul. Lovano toured with the Woody Herman Thundering Herd in the 1970s and went on to join the John Scofield Quartet.

The New York Philharmonic At Carnegie Hall

Oct 1, 2015

To open its 125th season, Carnegie Hall is bringing back the New York Philharmonic, an orchestra that presided there from 1891 until 1962 in more than 5,000 concerts — the most of any ensemble in the venue's storied history.

Even in the world of outré electronics, the experimental-music swings of Chicagoan Jamal Moss are radical. If you have the hips, stomach and brain for a steady stream of sonic surprises, he's your man in lo-fi techno. Among the many technologically astute and historically Afrocentric monikers Moss hides behind, Hieroglyphic Being has come to be his best known­ — if only because the labels through which Moss releases HB records (beside his self-run Mathematics Recordings) have the widest distribution.

There's no one person responsible for creating music festivals — or for making them such a huge part of how we witness live performances today. But starting in 1954, one person developed a recipe for their secret sauce.

George Wein still goes to his signature event every year, checking out performances and greeting the artists. These days, he does it on a golf cart which drives him between stages — he's about to turn 90, after all — but he says he takes his job as producer very seriously.