Music

News of the classical, jazz, and XPoNential worlds

Amateur Musicians Go Pro With The Baltimore Symphony

5 hours ago

What would it sound like if you put a bunch of amateur musicians onstage with a professional orchestra and told them to play? Probably a bit like a rehearsal at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore last month.

There was a voice during the civil rights movement of the 1960s that soothed and inspired those who marched on Southern streets and tried to sit at segregated lunch counters.

Fannie Lou Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper's daughter who grew up to become an activist and a musician. She registered black voters, stood up to bigotry, and was beaten by the police for her heroism. In 1983, Worth Long of the Smithsonian Institution put together a cassette recording of Hamer's music and recollections. That collection has just been reissued.

Tune in for the next All This Jazz, airing on Saturday the 18th at 9pm here on Public Radio 89.5 / KWGS-FM...and online via "Listen Live" stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org.

Our recently-expanded program now delivers three hours of modern jazz -- across a range of styles -- each and every Saturday night, from 9 till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.)

Seventy years ago, shortly after defeating Nazi Germany, three victorious leaders met in Potsdam, just outside Berlin. President Harry Truman was there with British and Soviet leaders Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Stuart Canin was also there — he was a 19-year-old GI from New York City who played the violin.

Rio Clemente On Piano Jazz

Jul 17, 2015

Rio Clemente was born Rosario Clemente in Morristown, N.J. Known as the "Bishop of Jazz," he was educated at the Juilliard School of Music. His training in classical music paved the way for his vibrant career in jazz, playing with the likes of Bucky Pizzarelli, Clark Terry, Milt Jackson and Bobby Hackett, with whom he toured.

For World Cafe's latest Latin Roots segment, Ernesto Lechner from The Latin Alternative is here to discuss progressive salsa. This 1970s music was influenced by the burgeoning prog-rock movement in the U.K. and the U.S., and, as Lechner puts it, there was a conscious effort to be as experimental as possible. He'll play a couple of examples (and include a Spotify playlist) on this page.

First Listen: Omar Souleyman, 'Bahdeni Nami'

Jul 15, 2015

There may be no more unlikely act in indie/electronic music than a sunglasses-and-keffiyeh-wearing wedding singer with a chain smoker's gruff voice. But Omar Souleyman is no ordinary musical act; if anything, he's one of the most resilient performers you'll see on the summer festival circuit, whether it's at FYF Fest, Big Ears Festival or Bonnaroo. Not that Souleyman's music is inherently strange itself.

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Iceland might be small and isolated but the country's music scene is substantial, resonating far beyond the island nation. One Icelandic group that thrives on both new and old classical music is Nordic Affect. Formed in 2005, the quartet of women is equally at home playing 17th century dance music and newly commissioned works like Clockworking, the title track from its forthcoming album.

L.A. native Kamasi Washington has one of the most critically acclaimed albums of the year with his three-volume set The Epic, released on Flying Lotus' Brainfeeder label. At KCRW's studio, Washington recently brought in a stripped-down version of his band, many of whose members he grew up with here in town.

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