Modern History

On this edition of ST, a compelling discussion with Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation whose writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone (and who is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR). We are discussing Berman's widely acclaimed book, "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," which first appeared last summer and will be published in paperback early next month.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown. He offers insight into both the scientific process and the sociology of science....

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Rana Foroohar, who is CNN's Global Economic Analyst and an Assistant Managing Editor at Time Magazine. She joins us by phone to talk about her new book, "Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business." As David Sax of Bloomberg Businessweek has noted of this widely acclaimed volume: "Three years ago, your can of Coke suddenly cost a few pennies more. The culprits? The clever bankers at Goldman Sachs.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting literary biography called "The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered In the Modern World." Our guest is the author, William Egginton, who is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and a Professor of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at the Johns Hopkins University. As was noted of this compelling study in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "Egginton weaves together Cervantes's life story with his development as a writer.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Geoffrey Harris, a noted expert on European history, politics, and culture. Last night, Mr. Harris gave a private address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "The European Union: Domestic and International Challenges," and he expands on his remarks on our program today. As noted at the Tulsa Committee's website: "Mr. Harris is currently the Deputy Head of the European Parliament Liaison Office with the U.S. Congress.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing an interesting new literary biography called "The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered In the Modern World." Our guest is the author, William Egginton, who is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and a Professor of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at the Johns Hopkins University. As was noted of this compelling study in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "Egginton weaves together Cervantes's life story with his development as a writer.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the two Michigan State University professors who will be jointly delivering the Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture in History tonight (Monday the 15th) on the TU campus. The lecture is free to the public; it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall. Our guests are Lewis H. Siegelbaum and Leslie Page Moch, who are also the co-authors of "Broad Is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia's Twentieth Century" (Cornell University Press).

(Note: This interview originally aired in June of this year.) One day in 1903, in the sandy, seaside Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed the direction of history. But it would take the world some time catch up with -- to both understand and appreciate -- what had happened that day. The age of flight had arrived, but its origin had been decidedly quiet, obscure, remote. And who exactly were Wilbur and Orville Wright, anyway?

Our guest on StudioTulsa today is the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author, and military historian Rick Atkinson, who is the recipient of this year's Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. (This prize is awarded annually by the Tulsa Library Trust.) Atkinson grew up a self-described "military brat" and began his writing career as a newspaper reporter in Pittsburgh, Kansas, and today he's perhaps best known for his bestselling "Liberation Trilogy" about the U.S. Army's role in the liberation of Europe during World War II.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Erik Larson, the bestselling nonfiction writer whose page-turning historical narratives include "The Devil in the White City," "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin," and (most recently) "Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania." This last named book -- exploring the events before, during, and after the 1915 sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania -- is the main thrust of our conversation, although Larson also speaks about how he locates, happens upon, researches, and writes his remarkable stories.

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