Modern Art

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the veteran artist James Grashow, born in Brooklyn in 1942, who's been creating an appealing, wide-ranging body of work since the 1960s. From large-scale environmental installations to album covers for Deep Purple and Jethro Tull to miniature "houseplants" (in which homes and buildings replace flowers and buds in intricately constructed bouquets), Grashow creates works that somehow thrive on both whimsy and decay, both wonder and mortality.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the author and writing instructor B. A. Shapiro about her widely praised new novel, "The Art Forger." In 1990, more than a dozen works of art (today worth, in sum, $500+ million) were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, but in this equally fascinating and entertaining novel, our heroine --- Claire Roth, a struggling young artist --- learns more about this theft than she ever bargained for.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Catherine Whitney, who's been the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa for the past couple of years now.

On today's edition of ST, an interesting discussion with the Ohio-based artist Cecile Baird, who is currently the ARTworks Featured Artist at Holland Hall School in Tulsa. A master of the colored-pencil medium, Baird has recently been working with art students at that school --- and several of her striking, well-rendered, nearly photo-realistic works will be on view at Holland Hall's Holliman Gallery (in the Walter Arts Center on the HH campus) through November 26th.

On today's show, an interesting discussion with Marc Masurovsky, who co-founded the Holocaust Art Restitution Project (HARP) in 1997. (He has served as HARP's Director of Research and is also a Board member.) An acknowledged expert in his field, Masurovsky has spent decades looking into various matters related to cultural assets that were looted or else sold under duress during the Holocaust and World War II; he's also served as an expert historian in a class-action lawsuit for Jewish claimants seeking restitution of lost accounts and other liquid assets from Swiss banks.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Marco Sassone, the award-winning Italian artist (b. 1942), who recently opened an exhibit at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville. "Marco Sassone: Architecture and Nature" will be on view at that museum through December 2nd. Born in a Tuscan village, raised and schooled in Florence, and later a resident of California for many years, the painter now resides in Toronto.

On this encore edition of ST, we hear from Anne-Marie O'Connor, a writer for The Washington Post (and formerly The Los Angeles Times), who tells us about her fascinating new work of nonfiction, "The Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt's Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer." This engaging story --- part history, part fairy-tale, part suspense yarn --- gives readers the biography, so to speak, of Klimt's famous rendering of Adele Bloch-Bauer, one of the most emblematic society portraits of its time; of the beautiful, seductive Viennese Jewish salon hostess who sat for

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