Medical Research

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're joined by Elizabeth Rosenthal, formerly of The New York Times, who tells us about her widely acclaimed new book, "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back." This volume, which grew out of the "Paying Till It Hurts" series of healthcare columns that she wrote for the Times, was thus praised in a starred in Publishers Weekly: "Rosenthal, a New York Times senior writer and former physician, provocatively analyzes the U.S.

More and more Americans are acutely suffering from allergies these days, and we are doing so for longer periods of time -- that is, in some cases, we can suffer for months rather than weeks. And more and more of us are developing allergy problems in adulthood -- rather than childhood -- which seems like a reversal of how things used to be. Why is all this going on, and why now? And is climate change somehow involved? Our guest on ST is Dr. Richard Weber, who is an allergy/immunology specialist with National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a fascinating show from January. At that time, we spoke with author Adam Tanner about his then-new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry. In his previous book...[Tanner] took a broad look at the enterprises that gather and sell computer-generated data on consumers.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with William Paiva, who became the executive director of Oklahoma State University's Center for Health Systems Innovation (CHSI) in 2014. A health and biotech venture capitalist who was on the board of directors for the CHSI since it began in 2012, Paiva is an Oklahoma native who received a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Oklahoma and an M.B.A. from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the newly renovated Tandy Family YMCA (at 5005 S. Darlington Avenue). This impressive new facility, per the YMCA of Greater Tulsa website, "is a YMCA for the next generation. More than 110,000 square feet dedicated to the pursuit of healthy living and community-building [comprise] this state-of-the-art facility...[which was] built on the grounds of the 50-year-old Thornton Family YMCA, one of the anchors of midtown Tulsa.

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"The disappearing maternal care problem is common across rural America. Only about 6 percent of the nation's OB/GYNs work in rural areas, according to the latest survey numbers from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Yet 15 percent of the country's population, or 46 million people, live in rural America.

Alzheimer's Disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's -- and by 2050, this number could be as high as 16 million. Alzheimer's Disease kills more people annually than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined. And every 66 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer's Disease.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his new book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

We are joined on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday by Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for more than two decades. Her previous book was "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine," and she joins us to discuss her new book, which follows up on that one.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with author Adam Tanner, who is a writer in residence at Harvard University's Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Tanner joins us to discuss his new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion of trauma-informed therapy. Our guest is Dr. Sara Coffey, who works in the OU-TU School of Community Medicine's Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. We speak her about her wide-ranging efforts to treat kids for various kinds of trauma -- how she helps kids regulate their emotions, articulate their feelings, feel better overall, deal with all sorts of issues, and understand that the trauma at hand isn't their fault.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we look back on the best and worst medical journalism of 2016 with Gary Schwitzer, the founder and publisher of the website HealthNewsReview.org. This website offers a daily appraisal of health-related reporting by major U.S. news outlets and organizations. Schwitzer has worked in various forms of health care journalism/communication for the past 40+ years; he knows this aspect of the medical world like no one else.

What is meant by the term "placebo effect"? What exactly is being described, and how is it brought about? And is this term a medical reality? Does it actually -- that is, scientifically -- exist? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we hear from journalist Erik Vance, whose writing has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, Scientific American, and other publications.

(Note: This interview originally aired in late June.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown.

(Note: This show originally aired back in April.) It's a straightforward fact, yet it's also frequently overlooked or dismissed: the great majority of premature deaths in this country can be prevented through changes in diet and lifestyle. Now comes a bestselling book that describes these changes while also explaining how such nutritional modifications can sometimes do more for us than prescription meds, other pharmaceuticals, and surgical procedures. Our guest is Dr. Michael Greger, author of "How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease." As Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting chat with Dr. James S. Gordon, a well-regarded expert on using mind-body medicine to heal depression, anxiety, and psychological trauma. Dr. Gordon is the Founder and Executive Director of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine; he's also a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at Georgetown Medical School. He tells us about The Center for Mind-Body Medicine (or CMBM) on today's show.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Bret Stetka, a health, science, and medical writer who works as an Editorial Director for Medscape by WebMD, and who is also a contributor to both Scientific American and Shots (the NPR Health blog). Stetka talks about how and why he decided, after completing his med-school training, to pursue medical journalism rather than, say, some sort of doctoring or medical research.

Recently, Tulsa's St. John Health System and the Tulsa Cancer Institute joined forces to become the Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute (or OCSRI). Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Suanne Gersdorf, who became the chief executive officer of OCSRI about a year and a half ago.

What, exactly, is a brain concussion? What causes one -- and what is happening to one's brain when a concussion occurs? Also, are concussions actually happening more often these days, or are medical and neurological professionals simply more sensitive to them -- or more aware of them? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Eric Sherburn, who is on the faculty of the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he serves in the Department of Family Medicine and Sports Medicine.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with two staff members at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (LIBR): Martin Paulus is Scientific Director and President of the facility, and Florence Breslin is its Psychiatric Research Coordinator. Both tells us about a truly groundbreaking new brain-development study that LIBR is participating in.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we talk with Alan Schwarz, a Pulitzer Prize-nominated investigative reporter who (until recently) was on the staff at The New York Times. He joins us to discuss his groundbreaking new book, "ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic." It's a detailed report on why the widespread misdiagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has become a sad yet undeniable fact of American life.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Lisa Miller, an author and psychologist whose latest book, a bestseller called "The Spiritual Child," is now out in paperback. Dr. Miller -- who wrote an article for Time.com last year based on this book entitled "Why Kids Who Believe in Something Are Happier and Healthier" -- is the Director of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, and she joins us by phone.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fascinating conversation that we had in April of 2013 with the noted primatologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Sapolsky (who's a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University) about his popular book, "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," which is now in its third edition.

Do you happen to know, among your circle of friends and relatives and colleagues, a "pack rat" or two -- i.e., people who just can't seem to throw things away? On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of compulsive hoarding, which is an anxiety disorder affecting a great many Americans that makes it quite difficult for someone to discard with possessions, regardless of the actual value of those possessions.

After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in America; it's a disease that afflicts 16 million men worldwide. Moreover, nearly 60% of African American men will develop, at some point in life, an issue with their prostate...and 19 percent of African American males will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. On this edition of our show, ST Medical Monday host John Schumann is talking about prostate cancer awareness with two Tulsans, Mike Newman and Walter Armstrong, who are both survivors of the disease.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a discussion with Jennifer Noonan, a Texas-based mother of two who is the founder of thegfcflady.com, a website for autism parents.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) We speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men" and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published in 2014, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the book by the St.

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