London

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Chris Cleave, the British novelist whose bestselling WWII-era yarn, "Everyone Brave Is Forgiven," is now in paperback. As was noted of this book by an Amazon critic: "We've been wondering lately: What is the secret sauce that makes novels like Anthony Doerr's 'All the Light We Cannot See' and Kristin Hannah's 'The Nightingale' so popular, stories set against the backdrop of WWII? Whatever it is, it made me approach Chris Cleave's 'Everyone Brave Is Forgiven' with a particularly wary eye.

Our guest on ST is Chris Cleave, the British novelist whose bestselling WWII-era yarn, "Everyone Brave Is Forgiven," has just appeared in paperback. As was noted of this book by an Amazon critic, when it was named (after first appearing in hardcover) as a Best Book of May 2016: "We've been wondering lately: What is the secret sauce that makes novels like Anthony Doerr's 'All the Light We Cannot See' and Kristin Hannah's 'The Nightingale' so popular, stories set against the backdrop of WWII?

"Come along now, Watson! The game is afoot!" On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing none other than Sherlock Holmes with the writer and editor Michael Sims, who is the author of (among other books) "The Story of Charlotte's Web," which both The Washington Post and The Boston Globe chose as a Best Book of the Year.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from March with Paul Strohm, who has taught medieval literature at Columbia University, was the J. R. R. Tolkien Professor of English Language and Literature at Oxford University, and remains a noted scholar of the life and work of Geoffrey Chaucer. When he appeared on our show, Strohm spoke about his newest book, "Chaucer's Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury." The year 1386, as Strohm explains, was probably the worst of Chaucer's life, but it's also when he began his best-known poem.