John Henning Schumann

"The big problem I see in the practice of medicine today is [that] our payment scheme makes it where we violate the first rule of medicine, which is: Listen to your patient and they'll tell you what's wrong. And we don't allow anybody the time to do that anymore." So says our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, U.S. Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican who's been the junior senator from Oklahoma since January of 2005.

Not only is there more and more debate --- and more policy, and more politics, and more "red tape" --- about health care these days, there's also much more journalism. On this edition of SToH, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Gary Schwitzer, who's been active in the field of health care journalism for 40 years now.

On this edition of ST on Health, we welcome Dr. Lamont Cavanagh, a Tulsa-based family physician who specializes in sports medicine, and who also works as an assistant professor at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Moreover, Dr. Cavanagh spent five years as an U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, and he's now chief of aerospace medicine for the 138th Fighter Wing of the Oklahoma Air National Guard.

One of the sweeping changes going on in American health care today --- apart from the whole Affordable Care Act juggernaut --- is the gradual, incremental transfer from using "paper charts and files" to employing electronic health records (or EHRs). EHRs, as is noted at the HealthIT.gov website, "can provide many benefits for providers and their patients, but the benefits depend on how they're used.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we welcome Dr. Julie Silver, an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She's also a prolific medical author and blogger, and her books include "What Helped Get Me Through: Cancer Survivors Share Wisdom and Hope" (American Cancer Society) and "After Cancer Treatment: Heal Faster, Better, Stronger" (Johns Hopkins Press). But she's not just a cancer expert, she's also a survivor --- following her acute treatment for cancer while still in her thirties, Dr.

The brilliant Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), the great American critic, fiction writer, poet, and satirist --- that famously witty (and frequently scathing) author whose many memorable assertions include "I don't care what is written about me so long as it isn't true" and "if all the girls who attended the Yale prom were laid end to end, I wouldn't be a bit surprised" --- is now back in business. That is, she's cracking wise all over again, in a manner of speaking, in a new book.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Mike Brose, who's been the executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa since 1993. (You'll find a full bio for Brose here.) Back in '93, when Brose first arrived, the Association (as it's often called) could only house 12 people; today, it provides housing for approximately 875 individuals and families, many of whom are battling mental illness and/or overcoming homelessness.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann presents an interesting conversation with the Augusta, Georgia-based physician, Dr. Rob Lamberts, who writes a popular medical blog called "Musings of a Distractible Mind" --- and who's also an expert on (and, indeed, a practitioner of) the so-called Direct Care method of health care. As Dr. Lamberts explains on his personal website, he left his longtime group practice in September of 2012 in order to "build a new solo practice, Dr. Rob Lamberts, LLC.

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about the Tulsa Center for Behavioral Health (TCBH), a state-operated facility that functions as a part of the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Dr. John Schumann, our guest host, welcomes Leah Price, the executive director at TCBH, who tells us what this organization is, how it operates, and why it matters.

Prescription drug abuse is becoming more and more of a serious problem in this country. According to some estimates, sales of such drugs have quadrupled over the last decade in the United States --- and Oklahoma actually ranks number one (out of all 50 states) in deaths attributed to Rx drug overdoses. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with Dr. William Yarborough, a local expert in this regard. Dr.

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