John Henning Schumann

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about Narcan, a/k/a Naloxone, which is a well-known and widely used opioid antagonist --- meaning, it's a drug that works to quickly block the effects of heroin, morphine, and similar opiates/sedatives. Narcan is thus administered in many instances where a person is experiencing (or has just recently experienced) a drug overdose; in this way, Narcan, which was originally developed in the 1960s, is thought to have saved some 50,000 lives nationally.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Tracy Davenport, a self-described "health care coordinator" --- basically, this means she's a freelance case manager who works to help patients and/or their families navigate today's ever-more-complicated medical system. It's often about being a good listener and asking lots of questions, says Davenport, who's had many years of experience as a registered nurse.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

This edition of SToH presents an interesting discussion about the "food insecurity" affecting so many Native American individuals, families, and communities today, here in Oklahoma and all over the nation. Addressing this insecurity --- and the serious and widespread health issues stemming from it --- is no easy task, and we meet a locally based public-health researcher, filmmaker, activist, and advocate who's taking a deliberately multifaceted approach in doing so. Dr.

From Sherwin Nuland and Abraham Verghese to William Carlos Williams and Robert Coles --- from Siddhartha Mukherjee to Atul Gawande --- there's a long and noble tradition in American writing of gifted authors and journalists who also work professionally as physicians. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we hear from such a writer, Dr. John Elefteriades, who's the Glenn Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Director of the Aortic Institute at Yale University and Yale-New Haven Hospital. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we hear from two doctors who are both highly accomplished and longtime advocates of public health, which has been defined as (per Wikipedia) "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations public and private, communities, and individuals." The health of a given culture or society, in other words, rather than any one individual's health or well-being.

On today's show, we listen back to a StudioTulsa on Health broadcast from October of last year. At that time, guest host John Henning Schumann spoke with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK. The focal point of this discussion was the then-new book that Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Michael M. Phillips, a staff reporter at the Washington, D.C., bureau of The Wall Street Journal. Phillips has reported on the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan since 2001, and he went to Iraq to cover a certain American battalion several times between 2003 and 2006. He writes often about the aftermath of these wars, including post-traumatic stress, suicide, and other issues facing veterans and their families.

Everyone knows, as even President Obama himself has recently admitted, that the arrival of the Affordable Care Act has been, frankly, a disaster. So far, anyway. But what happens next? And more precisely, what happens next in our neck of the woods?

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann conducts an interesting conversation with Brent Wolfe, director of the Tulsa County Juvenile Bureau. Most of us probably already know that Oklahoma's incarceration rate is alarmingly high --- our state ranks a shameful third in the nation in this regard --- but what might not be as commonly known is that many of these incarcerated adults began to run afoul of the law as juvenile offenders.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks Dr. Suzanne Koven, who practices internal medicine Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and who also writes the "In Practice" column for The Boston Globe. Earlier this month, Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Dr. Jack Sommers, chief medical officer for CommunityCare, the Tulsa-based medical insurance firm that's owned and operated by Saint Francis Hospital and St. John Medical Center. (This company began as CommunityCare HMO in 1993; you can read a full history for CommunityCare here.) In an interesting and wide-ranging discussion, Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann conducts a fascinating interview with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK, where he's also the Director of Research at the Manchester Collaborative Center for Inflammation Research. Dr.

"The big problem I see in the practice of medicine today is [that] our payment scheme makes it where we violate the first rule of medicine, which is: Listen to your patient and they'll tell you what's wrong. And we don't allow anybody the time to do that anymore." So says our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, U.S. Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican who's been the junior senator from Oklahoma since January of 2005.

Not only is there more and more debate --- and more policy, and more politics, and more "red tape" --- about health care these days, there's also much more journalism. On this edition of SToH, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Gary Schwitzer, who's been active in the field of health care journalism for 40 years now.

On this edition of ST on Health, we welcome Dr. Lamont Cavanagh, a Tulsa-based family physician who specializes in sports medicine, and who also works as an assistant professor at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Moreover, Dr. Cavanagh spent five years as an U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, and he's now chief of aerospace medicine for the 138th Fighter Wing of the Oklahoma Air National Guard.

One of the sweeping changes going on in American health care today --- apart from the whole Affordable Care Act juggernaut --- is the gradual, incremental transfer from using "paper charts and files" to employing electronic health records (or EHRs). EHRs, as is noted at the HealthIT.gov website, "can provide many benefits for providers and their patients, but the benefits depend on how they're used.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we welcome Dr. Julie Silver, an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She's also a prolific medical author and blogger, and her books include "What Helped Get Me Through: Cancer Survivors Share Wisdom and Hope" (American Cancer Society) and "After Cancer Treatment: Heal Faster, Better, Stronger" (Johns Hopkins Press). But she's not just a cancer expert, she's also a survivor --- following her acute treatment for cancer while still in her thirties, Dr.

The brilliant Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), the great American critic, fiction writer, poet, and satirist --- that famously witty (and frequently scathing) author whose many memorable assertions include "I don't care what is written about me so long as it isn't true" and "if all the girls who attended the Yale prom were laid end to end, I wouldn't be a bit surprised" --- is now back in business. That is, she's cracking wise all over again, in a manner of speaking, in a new book.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Mike Brose, who's been the executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa since 1993. (You'll find a full bio for Brose here.) Back in '93, when Brose first arrived, the Association (as it's often called) could only house 12 people; today, it provides housing for approximately 875 individuals and families, many of whom are battling mental illness and/or overcoming homelessness.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann presents an interesting conversation with the Augusta, Georgia-based physician, Dr. Rob Lamberts, who writes a popular medical blog called "Musings of a Distractible Mind" --- and who's also an expert on (and, indeed, a practitioner of) the so-called Direct Care method of health care. As Dr. Lamberts explains on his personal website, he left his longtime group practice in September of 2012 in order to "build a new solo practice, Dr. Rob Lamberts, LLC.

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about the Tulsa Center for Behavioral Health (TCBH), a state-operated facility that functions as a part of the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Dr. John Schumann, our guest host, welcomes Leah Price, the executive director at TCBH, who tells us what this organization is, how it operates, and why it matters.

Prescription drug abuse is becoming more and more of a serious problem in this country. According to some estimates, sales of such drugs have quadrupled over the last decade in the United States --- and Oklahoma actually ranks number one (out of all 50 states) in deaths attributed to Rx drug overdoses. On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with Dr. William Yarborough, a local expert in this regard. Dr.

File Photo

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host Dr. John Schumann speaks with the president and CEO of the Oklahoma Hospital Association, Craig Jones. About one in three Oklahomans lack adequate health insurance across our state; this means that state hospitals end up administering about $500 million in uncompensated care each year. Why is this the case? And can these numbers be changed? Jones also discusses Oklahoma's refusal to expand Medicaid, and how that decision will affect our hospitals --- as well as its impacts on health outcomes and measurements.

When medical experts, analysts, and researchers speak of "health care transformation" --- and the phrase has become increasingly common in certain circles --- they're referring to ongoing efforts to improve health outcomes, increase access to health/medical services, and enhance the way(s) in which care is delivered. Such efforts are meant to better connect scientific discovery, health care delivery, and reimbursement for health services. It's all about patient-centric care --- and much of it, as with so many things in our world today, comes down to technology.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, Dr. John Henning Schumann, our guest host, speaks by phone with Jessica Wapner, a freelance science writer who's focused mainly on health care and medicine.

Everyone knows the Internet is affecting if not entirely changing just about every facet of life today, and one area where this is particularly apparent is that of health and medicine. (Have you ever googled your doctor? Or do you know someone who's done so?

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we chat with Dr. Neil E. Caporaso of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, which is a research program of the National Cancer Institute --- which is, in turn, one of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Caporaso will be the keynote speaker at "Celebrating the Art of Healing," a cancer-survivor symposium to be held here in Tulsa on Saturday the 13th. This event will happen in the Mary K. Chapman Health Plaza at St. John Medical Center, lasting from 8:15am to 2:30pm. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, our guest host Dr. John Henning Schumann speaks with one of his esteemed medical colleagues, Dr. Jennifer Hays-Grudo, who is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine as well as the George Kaiser Family Foundation Chair in Community Medicine at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Dr. Hays-Grudo received both her master's and doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Houston and her bachelor's in psychology from Texas Tech University. "I'm interested in how people grow and change over time," she says. Dr.

Do you know how much was spent on health care in the U.S. in 2012? Would you believe $2.7 trillion? Today, more than ever, politicians, policy makers, pundits, and health care professionals are focused on the contradictory yet equally crucial aims of improving health care delivery and reducing the costs of that delivery. One individual focused in this way is Tom Adelson, the former State Senator for the 33rd District of Oklahoma, who now works in the private sector. Today, Dr. John Henning Schumann, our guest host, welcomes Adelson to the program.

Pages