John Henning Schumann

Do you know how much was spent on health care in the U.S. in 2012? Would you believe $2.7 trillion? Today, more than ever, politicians, policy makers, pundits, and health care professionals are focused on the contradictory yet equally crucial aims of improving health care delivery and reducing the costs of that delivery. One individual focused in this way is Tom Adelson, the former State Senator for the 33rd District of Oklahoma, who now works in the private sector. Today, Dr. John Henning Schumann, our guest host, welcomes Adelson to the program.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the poet/playwright/actress/musician Lenelle Moise as well as the actress/singer/songwriter Karla Mosley, who comprise the dynamic and diversely talented duo behind "Expatriate," a two-act, two-woman drama-meets-music performance piece that was presented Off-Broadway to glowing reviews in 2008, and that will soon be offered here in Tulsa by the Living Arts Gallery as part of that organization's New Genre XX Festival.

Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), the great American critic, fiction writer, poet, and satirist --- that famously witty (and frequently scathing) scribe whose many brilliant assertions include "I don't care what is written about me so long as it isn't true" and "if all the girls who attended the Yale prom were laid end to end, I wouldn't be a bit surprised" --- is now back in business. That is, she's cracking wise all over again, in a manner of speaking, in a new book.

In 1901, the first-ever oil well in Tulsa (from the Creek word, "Tallasi," meaning "Old Town") was established; the city itself had been officially incorporated in 1898. In 1905, the discovery of the fabled Glenn Pool oil field occurred --- and a boom town was born. And not just any boom town, but a petroleum-driven city-on-the-go, as Tulsa's population climbed to more than 140,000 between 1901 and 1930. On this edition of ST, we revisit the pivotal decade in this remarkable growth spurt as we discuss a new exhibit at the Tulsa Historical Society (or THS).

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, our guest host, Dr. John Henning Schumann, chats with John Silva, CEO of Morton Comprehensive Health Services, a non-profit organization which dates back to 1921 --- it first came into being as Maurice Willows Hospital, when it was created by the American Red Cross in the immediate wake of the Tulsa Race Riot --- and which is now one of Oklahoma's largest community health centers.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Michael Deem, who is the John W. Cox Professor in Bioengineering as well as a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University. Later today (Thursday the 31st), Prof. Deem will deliver a Phi Beta Kappa Lecture in Tyrrell Hall here on the TU campus; his address is entitled "In Search of Fundamental Mathematical Laws of Biology." (You can read a detailed bio for Prof.

Our ongoing StudioTulsa on Health series continues as we present an interesting discussion with Dr. Jennifer Clark, the Division Director of the Center for Palliative Care at OU-Tulsa's School of Community Medicine, where she is also an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. Dr. Clark, who additionally serves as the Palliative Care Medical Director at Hillcrest Medical Center here in Tulsa, talks to guest host John Henning Schumann about what palliative care is, and what it isn't.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Dr. David Kendrick of OU-Tulsa. Dr. Kendrick is the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center's Assistant Provost for Strategic Planning, an associate professor of internal medicine and pediatrics, and a Kaiser Chair of Community Medicine at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine at OU-Tulsa. (You can read his full bio here.) Dr.

On this installment of ST, we debut an ongoing series of occasional, health-related interviews called StudioTulsa on Health. In this series, guest host Dr. John Schumann of OU-Tulsa, who's also a regular commentator for our program, will discuss matters of health care, health policy, and healthy living with people from throughout our community --- and, moreover, with individuals from throughout the wider fields of medicine and medical scholarship (whether they're active in these fields nationally or globally).

Our guest on this installment of ST is Ken Busby, the Executive Director and CEO of the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa, which is, per its website, the long-standing "champion of area arts and culture.

On this edition of ST, we chat with our friend and colleague, John Wooley, who's been hosting his popular "Swing on This" western swing program on Public Radio Tulsa KWGS 89.5-1 for the past nine years or so. This show is heard every Saturday night at 7pm, and this coming Saturday, the 13th, John host a special, two-hour broadcast of his program, LIVE from the historic Cain's Ballroom in downtown Tulsa.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Derry Noyes, an art diretor and graphic designer with the US Postal Service (you can read her bio here). Noyes was the art director a series of Forever US Postage stamps created in 2011 to salute such pioneering American industrial designers as Norman Bel Geddes, Russell Wright, Henry Dreyfuss, and Walter Dorwin Teague.

On this edition of our show, we speak with our old friend Jeff Martin, who occasionally contributes commentaries to ST, works as the Online Communities Manager at Philbrook Museum of Art, and is the founder/mastermind behind the ongoing (and non-profit) Book Smart Tulsa series of readings/signings. This always-active, ever-engaging literary series --- which has been popular with Tulsa book-lovers of all sorts since its inception three years ago (or so) --- will present its 100th event tonight, Tuesday the 12th, at 7pm at Dwelling Spaces in downtown Tulsa.

On today's program, we offer a linguistic/semantic discussion of technology and culture --- what these two terms mean, what they've meant, what they mean in America as opposed to Europe, and where the ideas behind these terms overlap.

Should we --- could we --- really do away with the personal income tax here in Oklahoma? The State Legislature is now considering various proposals to reduce and/or eliminate the state's personal income tax; these proposals are largely based on a study prepared for the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs by economist (and former Reagan administration economic advisor) Arthur Laffer and his colleagues. But what if this study is, in fact, bogus? That's the claim now being made by a number of well-respected economists across the state.

On today's show, we chat with Dr. John Henning Schumann, a writer, internist, and medical educator at the University of Oklahoma's School of Community Medicine here in Tulsa. Earlier this month, Dr. Schumann wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled "The Doctor Is Out: Young Talent Is Turning Away From Primary Care" (which you can view here). As Dr. Schumann notes in this piece: "It's no secret that there's a looming crisis in primary care.

Today we're speaking about the intersection of law and politics at the highest levels of American society --- which is to say, we're discussing the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, both then and now --- and our guest is a highly regarded expert in this regard, Professor Martin Shapiro of the UC-Berkeley School of Law. Prof. Shapiro gave two free-to-the-public lectures here at TU last week, when he spoke as a part of the TU College of Law's 2012 Lectureship in Politics and Law.

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