Film

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that we first aired earlier this year with the author, essayist, and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman. At that time, we chatted with Klosterman about his essay collection, "I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)," which is an often funny and highly entertaining exploration of why we as a society are so attracted to -- yet also, of course, repelled by -- villains both fictional and nonfictional.

On this Veterans Day edition of StudioTulsa, we're talking about a certain classic novel that came out of World War I, "The Four Horsemen of The Apocalypse" by the Spanish author Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and about a silent-film epic, from 1921, which had the same title, and which was based on this novel -- and which also introduced audiences around the globe to an unknown actor named Rudolph Valentino.

(Note: This program originally aired in July.) On this edition of our show, we offer a how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Jonathan Scott Chinn, a filmmaker who lives and works in New York City, and who formerly worked as the producer of this radio show, from 1999 till 2001. Chinn's first feature film, which he directed, is a newly released drama/comedy called "The Widowers." It tells the story of best friends Jake and Jonathan, whose wives have both died in tragic accidents.

On this edition of our show, we welcome back Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us all about a small but impressive photography show currently on view at the museum. "Hard Times, Oklahoma, 1939-40: The Documentary Photography of Russell Lee" will run through October 26th. Beginning in 1936, Lee worked alongside Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and others as part of the government-sponsored Farm Security Administration, which was a New Deal program created by FDR.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded author, essayist, and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman, who has published a number of books and also writes the weekly "Ethicist" column for The New York Times Magazine. Klosterman's latest title, "I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)," is just out in paperback; it's a far-reaching, often funny, and highly entertaining exploration of why we as a society are so attracted to -- yet also, of course, repelled by -- villains both fictional and nonfictional...as well as the very notion of villainy itself.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting how-does-society-affect-our-mental-health discussion with Joel Gold, who, with his brother Ian, is one of the authors of "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness -- The Truman Show Delusion and Other Strange Beliefs." Dr. Joel Gold is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and was an attending psychiatrist in the department of psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center for nine years.

Our guest on ST today is William Joyce, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, veteran New Yorker magazine cover artist, and all-around creative guru. Joyce's many picture books include "George Shrinks," "Dinosaur Bob," and "Santa Calls" --- and he won three Emmy Awards for his "Rolie Polie Olie" animated TV series.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the distinctive films of writer/director Wes Anderson, whose vivid, detailed, and meticulously crafted movies include "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums," "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," and "Moonrise Kingdom" --- as well as "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is still in theaters nationwide. Our guest is Matt Zoller Seitz, a critic for New York magazine who has a new book out about Anderson's decidedly ornate cinematic world.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to an interview we did about a year ago with Jonathan Rossetti, who directed, stars in, and co-scripted "Home, James," a newly released indie feature film that was made here in T-Town...and that's now (or was recently) playing --- thanks to a distribution deal with Devolver Digital Films --- in New York City, Los Angeles, Portland, and the aforesaid Tulsa; "Home, James" will be screened at the Circle Cinema (near the corner of Admiral and Lewis) through May 29th.

This edition of SToH presents an interesting discussion about the "food insecurity" affecting so many Native American individuals, families, and communities today, here in Oklahoma and all over the nation. Addressing this insecurity --- and the serious and widespread health issues stemming from it --- is no easy task, and we meet a locally based public-health researcher, filmmaker, activist, and advocate who's taking a deliberately multifaceted approach in doing so. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Rebecca Miller, the acclaimed screenwriter, author, and filmmaker, who'll appear tonight (Thursday the 17th) at 7pm at a free-to-the-public Book Smart Tulsa event at the Circle Cinema. At this gathering, she'll be reading from and signing copies of her latest novel, "Jacob's Folly," which is just out in paperback; she'll also deliver an introduction before a screening of her 2009 film, "The Private Lives of Pippa Lee" (which she adapted from her novel of the same title).

Our guest on ST is Anthony Horowitz, the prolific English novelist and screenwriter who creates a range of different works in the mystery/suspense/thriller genre. He might be best known for his young adult adventure stories known as the Alex Rider series, all of which feature the eponymous teenage spy (who's saved the world on several different occasions). The tenth and final Alex Rider book has just been published --- it's called "Russian Roulette," and Horowitz tells us all about it on today's show.

The Circle Cinema Celebrates Its 85th Birthday

Jul 10, 2013
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Moviegoers, rejoice! The Circle Cinema is turning eighty-five! The theatre opened on July 15, 1928, with a showing of "Across the Atlantic," starring Monte Blue --- in this picture, according to advertisements from the period, Blue "flies to France...and...finds romance." The Circle is Tulsa's only remaining historical movie theatre (and the only theatre in town built before the 1960s); it's listed with the Oklahoma Historical Preservation Office and on the National Register of Historic Places.

One of the more famous lines attributed to John Ford (1894-1973), the iconic film director who made many of the finest Westerns ever to come out of Hollywood, goes like this: "When the truth becomes legend, print the legend." That line is from "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance," a movie from the early 1960s, but it just as clearly applies to "The Searchers," the classic Western from 1956, with John Wayne and Natalie Wood, which is commonly seen as a Ford masterpiece.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Jonathan Rossetti, a young actor/writer/director who grew up in Tulsa and is now based in Los Angeles. Rossetti joins us by phone from Oklahoma City, where his newly completed indie film, "Home, James," will have its public debut tomorrow, Saturday the 8th, at 2pm at the Harkins Bricktown Cinema 2. "Home, James," which Rossetti directed, co-wrote, and stars in, is appearing as part of OKC's annual deadCenter Film Festival.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is A.O. Scott, who's been a film critic at The New York Times since 2000. Scott will appear at a "Talking Heads" lecture/Q&A this evening (Thursday the 4th) at Congregation B'nai Emunah in Tulsa, near 17th and Peoria. The event begins at 7pm, and there's an optional dinner beforehand, beginning at 5:45pm.

Move over, Oscar; your uber-hyped, high-octane night of movie-making awards and accolades is now done with. This evening, Monday the 25th, at 7pm here on the University of Tulsa campus --- in the Gussman Concert Hall of the Lorton Performance Center --- the TU Film Studies Department will present its Fifth Annual Spring Film Festival, which is free to the public. This will be a juried festival, wherein prizes will be awarded after the screenings for Best Film, Runner-Up, Best Original Score, and Audience Choice. Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Prof.

Tulsa Ballet will soon present "Lady of the Camellias," with performances scheduled for February 1st, 2nd, and 3rd at the Tulsa PAC.

The Best of ST in 2012: Bob Balaban

Dec 27, 2012

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion with the well-known Hollywood actor --- and children's book author --- Bob Balaban. When we spoke with Mr. Balaban by phone, back in early October, he had just put out a book called "The Creature from the Seventh Grade: Boy or Beast" (Penguin Young Readers Group). We spoke with him about this work, and about his efforts as a writer and actor --- and film producer / director / screenwriter --- more generally.

Our guest on this installment of ST is J.B. Kaufman, an author and film historian on the staff of the Walt Disney Family Foundation. He's just put out an extensively detailed and lavishly illustrated coffee-table book, "The Fairest One of All: The Making of Walt Disney's 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.'" This year marks the 75th anniversary of this classic film's initial release, and Kaufman's hefty volume explores every facet of the making of the film, with pages and pages of never-before-published facts and artwork.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with Keith Ochwat, the Managing Director of the non-profit Documentary Foundation, which has produced some notable films that have appeared on PBS-TV. This organization's latest film, "Age of Champions," is due to appear on PBS in 2013. It's an inspiring, highly engaging group portrait of several different athletes/participants in the National Senior Olympics, and Ochwat is the film's producer.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the renowned artist, art director, cartoonist, and illustrator Wayne White --- along with the filmmaker Neil Berkeley, who's directed a documentary about White's influential and still-thriving career, "Beauty Is Embarrassing." This film premiered at SXSW in Austin, Texas, earlier this year, and it will be screened tonight, the 15th, at the Philbrook Museum of Art (at a "Third Thursday" event, beginning at 5:30pm), and tomorrow night, Friday the 16th, at the Circle Cinema (at 6pm).

He's a familiar and award-winning Hollywood actor, as well as an acclaimed director and producer. He's also (who knew?) a highly successful children's book author. Our guest on ST is Bob Balaban, who tells us about his newest book, "The Creature from the Seventh Grade: Boy or Beast" (Penguin Young Readers Group). In this funny, tween-friendly tale, we meet Charlie Drinkwater, a middle-school kid who's probably among the least popular --- and least noticed --- boys in his class.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a conversation with Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells did an event here in Tulsa (at the Philbrook Museum of Art) back in May; at that time, she stopped by our studios to talk about her interesting work on AMC's "Mad Men" --- a critically acclaimed show that's routinely praised as much for its costumes

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the French-born, Brooklyn-based, and widely acclaimed guitarist, Stephane Wrembel, who performs this evening (Wednesday the 11th) at 7pm at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame in downtown Tulsa.

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"1913 Massacre" is the name of a song that Woody Guthrie wrote circa 1941; it recounts an early-20th-century tragedy that happened at the Italian Hall building in Calumet, Michigan, on Christmas Eve of 1913, when hundreds of miners, along with their families and friends, had gathered for a party. At that time, Calumet was at the heart of Michigan's then-lucrative copper-mining activity.

How big a problem is bullying in our nation's schools today? It's a troubling issue affecting the lives of millions of our kids; when it comes to how many schoolchildren are being bullied each year in America, estimates range from 7 to 13 million youngsters. On this installment of ST, we speak with Lee Hirsch, producer and director of the documentary film, "Bully," which was released last year to widespread critical acclaim.

On this edition of ST, which originally aired back in March, we speak with Jamal Joseph, whose new memoir is "Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention." This engrossing autobiography --- a gritty yet hopeful hybrid of coming-of-age candor, street-savvy wisdom, and recent socio-political history --- follows Jospeph from his early years in the Bronx and Harlem, to incarceration stints in Riker's Island and then Leavenworth, to the Film School faculty of Columbia University.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells will speak this evening (Thursday the 17th) at 7pm at the Philbrook Museum of Art; her appearance is a part of the museum's ongoing "Third Thursday" series.

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