Film

On this installment of ST, a look back at several of the more notable movies of 2015 with Michael Smith, the film critic at The Tulsa World. He joined this city's daily paper in 1996, and just to be clear about matters from the outset: Smith recently wrote in that newspaper that he thinks "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" is the "best film in [that] franchise." Really? That good?

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men," "The Way of the World," and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published last year, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the book by the St.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa American Film Festival, which, per its website, "showcases independent feature and short films from across the U.S., highlighting Native American films, Oklahoma-based filmmakers, local student short films, a classic Oklahoma-centric film retrospective in addition to panels and parties." The festival happens later this week, from the 15th through the 18th, with screenings at the Circle Cinema and other events at the Woody Guthrie Center and the Gilcrease Museum.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the charmingly off-the-wall and/or downright ghoulish cartoons of Charles Addams, whose distictive, humorous drawings graced the pages of The New Yorker (and other magazines) for many years, and were the basis, of course, for "The Addams Family" (of TV and movie fame). More than 50 works by Addams are now on display at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education in downtown Tulsa; "Charles Addams: Family and Friends" will be on view through September 27th.

Our guest on this edition of ST is the locally based filmmaker Sterlin Harjo, who tells us about his latest feature, "Mekko." Most of this movie was shot in Tulsa, and it profiles a Native American ex-con (the film's title character) as he tries to rebuild his life after 19 years behind bars. Mekko has no home, no immediate family, and little cash -- so he soon ends up on the streets, where he's eventually taken in by Tulsa's homeless Native community.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly created feature-length documentary film, "Boomtown: An American Journey," which depicts the history of the City of Tulsa. Our guests are Russ Kirkpatrick, the producer and executive producer of this film, and Michelle Place, the executive director of The Tulsa Historical Society and Museum, which originally commissioned it.

(Note: This interview originally aired in March of this year.) Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

On this presentation of ST, we chat with Joe Randazzo, a former editor of The Onion and former creative director of adultswim.com who now writes for the Comedy Central program called @midnight.

John Williams -- the still-active genius who created the music for such classic movies as "Jaws," "Star Wars," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "E.T.: The Extraterrestrial," and "Schindler's List" (to name just a handful) -- is arguably the greatest composer ever to work in Hollywood. And his memorable, broadly popular music will be the focal point for the final Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert of this season.

On this edition of AT, an interesting and far-reaching chat with Dan and Cheryl Foliart -- a husband-and-wife team who are, respectively, a Hollywood composer and a music executive, and who are both currently visiting TU as J. Donald Feagin Guest Artists.

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