StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Kim Johnson, who became chief executive officer of the Tulsa City-County Library on January 1st. After more than 15 years as an employee of the TCCL, Johnson seems like a perfect fit for this leadership post. She's very committed, of course, to books and learning and literacy -- and to the vital purpose of libraries within society today -- and she's the first African American to lead the 24-branch system that is the TCCL.

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a systematic, wide-ranging, and newly released effort to improve the health of the people of Tulsa County (where more than 60 percent of the population is overweight or obese). Our guest is Bruce Dart, executive director of the Tulsa Health Department, who tells us about his organization's multi-faceted Community Health Improvement Plan (or CHIP).

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Daniel Hege, the Principal Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra. Hege is back in town to conduct the TSO's next concert, which happens tomorrow night (Saturday the 14th) at 7:30pm in the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall. This concert will feature Beethoven's Symphony No. 4  as well as works by Mendelssohn ("The Hebrides") and Ravel ("Le tombeau de Couperin" and "Tzigane").

On this edition of ST, we learn about several special, free-to-the-public events scheduled for this coming weekend in connection with MLK Day. Events are planned for both Sunday the 15th and Monday the 16th in downtown Tulsa (with the 16th, of course, being the actual Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday). On the 15th, there will be a Walk of Peace and Solidarity as well as an Interfaith Commemorative Service. On the 16th, a Founders Breakfast will precede the 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a discussion that originally aired in February of last year. At that time, we spoke with Julia Clifford, the director of a documentary film called "Children of the Civil Rights." This film tells the little-known yet true story of a group of schoolchildren in Oklahoma City who -- for nearly six years -- staged Civil Rights-era sit-ins at various diners and lunch counters in OKC. These protests began in 1958, more than a year before the far more familiar Greensboro, North Carolina, sit-ins occurred.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Russian hacking attempts worldwide, of cyber-attacks on the DNC that were meant to affect the 2016 Presidential Election, and of related news stories. And we'll also discuss, in more detail, what might be seen as the hi-tech precursor to these stories -- that is, the Soviet Union's longtime efforts to create a kind of national internet...long before the internet itself actually existed.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion of trauma-informed therapy. Our guest is Dr. Sara Coffey, who works in the OU-TU School of Community Medicine's Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. We speak her about her wide-ranging efforts to treat kids for various kinds of trauma -- how she helps kids regulate their emotions, articulate their feelings, feel better overall, deal with all sorts of issues, and understand that the trauma at hand isn't their fault.

Our guest is Bruce Sorrell, Executive Director of Chamber Music Tulsa, or CMT, who tells us about the upcoming Beethoven Winter Festival that his wonderful organization is presenting next month. As noted at the CMT website: "The Beethoven Winter Festival, happening February 17-26, 2017, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, takes both a mental and musical journey with the composer when the Miro Quartet performs all 16 of Beethoven's string quartets in chronological order over six concerts.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Frances McCall Rosenbluth, a Professor of Political Science at Yale University and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the co-author of a new book called "Forged Through Fire: War, Peace, and the Democratic Bargain," which she discusses with us. As was noted in a starred review of this book by Kirkus, this is a "sometimes-counterintuitive but always fascinating interrogation of the history and uses of war....

Last month, it was announced that the long-awaited Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture -- or OKPOP, as it's also called -- will be built and housed at 422 N. Main Street in downtown Tulsa, just across the street from the historic Cain's Ballroom. As Dr.

Hello and Happy New Year. We were pleased to offer you The Best of StudioTulsa in 2016 over the holidays, and in that regard, here's a rundown of what we've aired recently and when we aired it. Note that each program described below has a link whereby you can access a free, on-demand audio-stream of the show in question. Thank you for listening.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer a chat with Douglas Miller, the principal behind Müllerhaus Legacy, a Tulsa-based firm that creates books and other publications on-demand for private organizations and special occasions. A graphic artist and book designer by trade, Miller is also, in fact, a writer, since a book for which he's the lead author has just recently appeared.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we look back on the best and worst medical journalism of 2016 with Gary Schwitzer, the founder and publisher of the website HealthNewsReview.org. This website offers a daily appraisal of health-related reporting by major U.S. news outlets and organizations. Schwitzer has worked in various forms of health care journalism/communication for the past 40+ years; he knows this aspect of the medical world like no one else.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) On this installment of ST, we welcome the bestselling author Mark Kurlansky back to our show. Kurlansky's latest book, which he discusses with us today, is "Paper: Paging Through History." It's a detailed and deeply researched volume that both explains and explores one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past 2,000 years or so, the ability to produce paper in ever more efficient ways has supported -- if not driven -- the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with James Wagner, the Chief of Performance Strategy and Innovation in Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum's newly formed administration. Mr. Wagner was previously the principal transportation planner for the Indian Nations Council of Governments (or INCOG), and he appeared on this program several times in that capacity.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Tim Sharp, the well-regarded and widely experienced Artistic Director and Conductor of the Tulsa Oratorio Chorus (or TOC). Later this week, on Thursday the 15th, the TOC will present a special holiday program, "The 'Glorias' of Christmas," beginning at 7:30pm in the Lorton Performance Center on the University of Tulsa campus. This concert will feature two separate and distinct (but equally wonderful) "Glorias" -- one by Antonio Vivaldi, the other by Francis Poulenc -- that both draw upon the same written text.

What is meant by the term "placebo effect"? What exactly is being described, and how is it brought about? And is this term a medical reality? Does it actually -- that is, scientifically -- exist? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we hear from journalist Erik Vance, whose writing has appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, Scientific American, and other publications.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Amy Haimerl, a professor of journalism at Michigan State University who writes about small business and urban policy for Fortune, Reuters, The New York Times, and other outlets.

(Note: This interview originally aired in late June.) On this edition of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, who is best known for his landmark book about cancer, "The Emperor of All Maladies." He has a new book out, "The Gene," which he discusses with us today. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Mukherjee deftly relates the basic scientific facts about the way genes are believed to function, while making clear the aspects of genetics that remain unknown.

In late 2014, President Obama and Raúl Castro announced that the United States and Cuba would restore full diplomatic ties for the first time in more than 50 years. And late last month, of course, Fidel Castro died at age 90. So what happens next in U.S.-Cuban relations? Where do we go from here? Our guest on ST recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations that was focused on such questions. Ambassador Dennis K.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are joined by Cheryl Waldeck, a local author, consultant, and culinary whiz whose previous book, "The Joy of Food," offered more than 100 recipies that she'd compiled over 30+ years. That book, as she tells us, grew out of a desire to pass along to her adult kids the "how to" details for the various dishes they'd grown up eating (and loving) in the Waldeck home. Now comes a new book, "Occasions: Seasonal Menus and Entertaining Secrets," which Waldeck describes for us today.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with two representatives from the Tulsa Housing Authority (or THA): Matt Letzig is the organization's Interim CEO and Terri Cole is its VP for Assisted Housing. THA, as noted at its website, "provides publicly assisted housing comprised of traditional public housing, mixed finance sites, and Section 8. Currently, THA provides assistance to more than 20,000 individuals, or 7,200 families....

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer. She's a Seattle-based bestselling author and retired librarian, and she used to work as a bookseller (decades ago) here in Tulsa. A tireless book advocate and literary critic -- and perhaps the only librarian ever to be fashioned and sold as an action figure -- Nancy can also be heard occasionally recommending books on NPR's Morning Edition. She talked with us about the following titles, all of which she thinks would make great gifts this holiday season:

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to our show Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees, which is a popular nonprofit that's been active in Tulsa since 1976. As noted at the Up With Trees website: "In the last four decades, we have planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which was established last year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to both enrich and expand the local art scene by recruiting artists from all over the nation to the Tulsa area. This fellowship, per its website, "provides an unrestricted stipend, free housing, and work-space in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to US Resident artists.... The Fellows are expected to integrate into the local arts community, such as [via] studio and collection visits.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Billy Collins back to our show. He is the winner of the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, and he'll be reading from his work at an event here in Tulsa on Saturday the 3rd at the downtown Central Library. (This event begins at 10:30am and is free to the public.) Known and loved by readers everywhere for his accessible, conversational, clearly rendered, and often witty poems, Collins has been called "the most popular poet in America" by The New York Times.

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