StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

Earlier this summer, the Tulsa-based theatre company, Clark Youth Theatre, was honored to perform at the very first YouthFest during the American Association of Community Theatre's 2017 National Festival. Only a handful of youth theatre companies from across the U.S. were invited to participate in the festival, which happened in Rochester, Minnesota. At this special gathering, Clark Youth Theatre staged "Snow Angel," by playwright David Lindsay-Abaire, as our guest today tells us.

On this edition of our show, an interesting if rather unsettling discussion with Edward D. Hess, who is a co-author of the newly released book, "Humility Is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age." As was noted of this volume in a detailed appreciation posted at the online San Francisco Review of Books: "What will be the percentage of jobs that technology will replace in the United States during the next two decades? Estimates vary but not that much. There seems to be a consensus: a range of 45 to 50% between now and 2037.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Robert Pearl, who was until recently the executive director and CEO of The Permanente Medical Group, which is responsible for the health care of 3.8 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide; Dr. Pearl was also selected by Modern Healthcare as one of the most powerful physician-leaders in the nation.

On this edition of ST -- with the Tour de France now in full swing -- we learn about both the origins and the development of the greatest race in all of cycling. Our guest is Peter Cossins, who's written about professional cycling since the early 1990s -- and who is a contributing editor at Procycling Magazine. His new book, just out, is called "The First Tour de France: Sixty Cyclists and Nineteen Days of Daring on the Road to Paris." As was noted of this book by a critic for Podium Cafe (a journal of cycling news, analysis, and opinion): "Essential....

What can American motion pictures tell us about the American South, and what can the South tell us about the movies? Our guest is Robert Jackson, an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa.

The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the adolescent and post-adolescent years, and all that go with them -- can be difficult, of course, for a host of reasons. Whether it's finding a job, finishing school, locating a place to live, discovering what one's goals really are, deciding on a career path, and so forth -- these can be trying experiences; relying on the aid of one's family and friends in such cases is paramount. But what if you're confronting these realities and you actually have no family? Or you have no "support network" of friends, mentors, and relatives?

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak by phone with Kim Garrett, the executive director and founder of Palomar, the nonprofit Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, which opened its doors earlier this year and has already aided thousands of people. Drawing on the resources of hundreds of professionals and volunteers, Palomar helps OKC-area victims of violence -- that is, individuals from all walsk of life and their children -- by offering protection, hope, and healing in a single location; some 14 different organizations are all based on-site at Palomar.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the award-winning Oklahoma writer Rilla Askew back to our show. Her new book, just out, is her first-ever nonfiction volume; it's a collection of nine linked essays entitled "Most American: Notes from a Wounded Place." In this timely and reflective work, she argues that the State of Oklahoma -- whether we are talking about police violence, gun culture, race relations, secret history, religious fervor, spellbinding landscapes, or brutal weather -- is actually a "microcosm" of the United States.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Chris Cleave, the British novelist whose bestselling WWII-era yarn, "Everyone Brave Is Forgiven," is now in paperback. As was noted of this book by an Amazon critic: "We've been wondering lately: What is the secret sauce that makes novels like Anthony Doerr's 'All the Light We Cannot See' and Kristin Hannah's 'The Nightingale' so popular, stories set against the backdrop of WWII? Whatever it is, it made me approach Chris Cleave's 'Everyone Brave Is Forgiven' with a particularly wary eye.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Corey Williams, the executive director of the nonprofit Sustainable Tulsa, which is driven by (as noted at its website) these core principles: "A thriving society, responsible economic growth, and environmental stewardship...[which] are the mutually reinforcing pillars of sustainability." Ms. Williams tells us about Sustainable Tulsa's next First Thursday presentation, which is a free event happening tomorrow (the 6th) at the TCC Center for Creativity (near 10th and Boston in downtown Tulsa).

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interesting discussion about water conservation and related subjects with Noah Roberts, the proprietor of a recently opened shop in downtown Tulsa called The Water Co. This business sells water-bottle filling stations as well as reusable bottles, cups, and straws. And it does so, as noted on its website, in order to "improve community health and habitat by providing drinking water systems and reusable drinkware as an alternative to single-serve plastic bottles and cups.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to welcome back to the show Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer. A former Tulsa resident, Nancy is a retired librarian, best-selling author, literary critic, and tireless reading advocate -- as well as a frequent book reviewer for NPR's All Things Considered. She joins us to offer some can't-miss reading suggestions for the summer months. Here are the books she tells us about:

Peter Blauner, "Proving Ground"

Jamie Harrison, "The Widow Nash"

Stephen Mack Jones, "August Snow"

Joseph Kanon, "Defectors"

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with Prof. Ryan Perroy, who teaches in the Dept. of Geography and Environmental Science at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. Prof. Perroy is currently visiting Tulsa, and he stopped by our studios to discuss how he studies and tracks various challenges associated with climate change in Hawaii, including rising sea-levels, warming temperatures, coral bleaches, and so on. He also speaks about how he and his colleagues employ state-of-the-art technology -- including drones -- to monitor these challenges.

(Note: This interview originally aired in 2014.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis, who has written several well-regarded books on the events and persons concerning the founding of the United States. His fascinating book called "Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence" -- which he discusses with us today -- details two seminal events in the summer of 1776, both of them quite central to our nation's founding.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa; "Hope & Fear: Propaganda of the Great War" will be on view through November 12th. Our guests are the show's co-curators, Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Librarian/Archivist Thomas Young. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "To commemorate the 100th anniversary year of America's entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the Museum's permanent collection.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about (brace yourself) dirty diapers and the parents who fixate on them. Our guest is Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, which is America's largest children's hospital. He tells us about his new book, which reveals the many useful solutions that he's both utilized and developed over the course of his distinguished career in addressing the digestive health problems of children.

Our guest is Todd Cunningham, the Executive Director of Arts Alliance Tulsa, which is, per its website, "a United Arts Fund that strengthens and supports the arts for a greater Tulsa through fundraising, support services, audience development, and responsible investment and allocation of resources." Comprised of dozens of outstanding nonprofit arts groups from throughout the Tulsa area, Arts Alliance Tulsa has only been around for a couple of years now -- but its very presence highlights the important role that the arts play in our community'

Theatre Tulsa -- founded in 1922 -- is the longest-running local theatre west of the Mississippi River, and the seventh oldest in the United States. To mark its 95th anniversary, the company will present a special presentation this weekend at the Tulsa PAC. The show, featuring a cast of one hundred or more, is called "Local Landmark, National Treasure: An Epic Concert Celebrating 95 Years of Theatre Tulsa" -- and it will be staged June 23rd and 24th at 8pm, and then on the 25th at 2pm.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) On this installment of ST, we chat with the British writer Kate Hamer, whose first novel has appeared here in the U.S. to widespread acclaim. "The Girl in the Red Coat," as an Amazon reviewer has noted of this book, recounts what is basically "every parent's nightmare: Beth, a single mother, takes her 8-year-old daughter, Carmel, to a local festival for some fun and frivolity and she vanishes. What follows is an unusual and terrifying journey for them both.

(Note: This program first aired in April.) On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of an engaging book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

(Note: This program first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Brett McKay, a native Tulsan whose "Art of Manliness" blog gets about 10 million visitors each month.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an equally fascinating and entertaining discussion with the one-and-only Rebecca Ungerman, the influential and diversely-talented and fan-tabulous singer/songwriter/performer who's been wowing Tulsa audiences for 20+ years. She's bringing not one but two different shows to the Tulsa PAC's SummerStage series this month: "Cats of Any Color" will be staged on the 17th and 18th, and "Oy, Gestalt!" will be presented on the 24th and 25th.

Our guest is Bryce Hoffman, a bestselling author, speaker, and consultant who helps companies plan better and leaders lead better by applying systems from the worlds of business and the military. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Red Teaming: How Your Business Can Conquer the Competition by Challenging Everything." What is "red teaming," you ask?

Our guest on this broadcast of ST is the acclaimed filmmaker Annie O'Neil, who is probably best known for her work on the award-winning documentary, "Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago," which is a detailed profile, directed by Lydia Smith, of six hikers making the difficult, 500-mile Camino De Santiago pilgrimage to the shrine of St. James in Galicia, Spain. After this film came out in 2013, O'Neil was contacted by one Phil Volker, a man living near Seattle with Stage 4 cancer.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

Is America truly an "exceptional" nation? And what do we mean, really, when we assert this? Our guest on this edition of ST is Mugambi Jouet, who teaches at Stanford Law School, and whose writing has been featured in Mother Jones, Slate, The New Republic, the Huffington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Exceptional America: What Divides Americans from the World and from Each Other." As was noted of this timely work by The Mercury News: "Thought-provoking....

(Note: This program originally aired in April.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there ARE more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Richard Harris, a longtime science reporter at NPR, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions." As was noted of this alarming and well-regarded new book by Kirkus Reviews: "An award-winning science journalist reports that research in the biomedical sciences is too often guilty of wasting time and money and, worse than that, actually slowing scientific progress and misinforming the public.

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