Arts and Crafts

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to present the first episode of Museum Confidential: The Podcast, a bi-weekly endeavor which Public Radio Tulsa has been co-creating with Philbrook Musueum of Art since mid-October. Hosted by Jeff Martin of Philbrook and edited and produced by our own Scott Gregory, this podcast is an extension of the popular "Museum Confidential" exhibit now on view at Philbrook, which will run through early May of 2018. Both the podcast and the exhibit, as we learn today, explore in various ways what goes on "behind the scenes" at a given museum.

On this edition of our show, we learn about "Eloquent Craftsman: Tom Manhart and His Students," a new exhibition focusing on the artwork and teaching career of Thomas A. Manhart, a thoughtful and influential sculptor who was a much-admired professor of art at TU from 1963 to 1993.

On this edition of ST, we get an update on the Kravis Discovery Center at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Located in the museum’s lower level, the Center recently underwent an extensive renovation in order to create a more interactive, more tech-driven -- and thus more "21st century" -- experience. Our guest is Dr. Bob Pickering, a Professor of Anthropology here at TU as well as a Senior Curator at Gilcrease.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with Scott Stulen, the President and Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art. At a press conference earlier today, Stulen announced a number of exciting changes in store for Philbrook, which will take effect very soon.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about a new exhibition (which opens this evening, the 4th) at the 108 Contemporary Gallery in downtown Tulsa. "Both Sides Now: Joyce J. Scott & Sonya Clark" will be on view through September 24th. Scott is our guest on the program today. And the exhibit in which she's co-featured is thus described at the 108 website: "Through the use of glass, beadwork, and fiber, 2016 MacArthur Fellow Joyce J.

Living Arts of Tulsa -- a vital part of the arts scene here in town, and a long-running locally-based nonprofit that seems to be increasingly popular -- now has, for the first time in decades, a new artistic director. Our guest on ST is that individual: Jessica Borusky, who's been on the job for only two or three weeks at this point.

(Note: This program first aired in April.) On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of an engaging book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Scott Stulen, the President and Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a special show now on view at the museum. It's a rich gathering of work by 26 different artists from the well-regarded Chicano art collection of Cheech Marin, the movie actor and author.

Our guest is the celebrated photographer David Halpern, who was based for many years here in Tulsa and now resides in Santa Fe. A wonderful exhibition of his work -- "The Essence of Place: Celebrating the Photography of David Halpern" -- will be on view at the Gilcrease Museum through the end of this year.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of a striking and engaging new book, "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Steve Liggett back to our program. A well-known figure on the local arts scene, Liggett is an art teacher and sculptor who's also the director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa, which was established in the 1960s by Virginia Myers and others as a haven for the creation and display of contemporary art right here in T-Town.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with Basil Twist, the New York City-based puppeteer who was a MacArthur genius grant recipient in 2015. He has been universally acclaimed for his puppet-related design, construction, choreography, staging, and other work on productions such as "Symphonie Fantastique," "Dogugaeshi," "Red Beads", "Petrushka," "Hansel and Gretel," "Master Peter's Puppet Show," and so on.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which was established last year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to both enrich and expand the local art scene by recruiting artists from all over the nation to the Tulsa area. This fellowship, per its website, "provides an unrestricted stipend, free housing, and work-space in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to US Resident artists.... The Fellows are expected to integrate into the local arts community, such as [via] studio and collection visits.

(Note: This interview first aired back in July.) On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Penn, a British writer and journalist whose books include "It's All About the Bike," a bestselling memoir of craftsmanship. Penn joins us to speak out his new book, just out from W.W. Norton, which is called "The Man Who Made Things Out of Trees." As is noted of this book at the Norton website: "Out of all the trees in the world, the ash is most closely bound up with who we are: the tree we have made the greatest and most varied use of over the course of human history.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about "Native Fashion Now," a traveling exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum here in Tulsa through January 8, 2017. Our guest is Christina Burke, the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at Philbrook, who tells us how this show thoroughly and engagingly blends cutting-edge/modern-day fashion with classic Native American iconography/imagery. And further, per the Philbrook website: "Visitors are invited to explore the rich and surprising realm of contemporary Native fashion.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Penn, a British writer and journalist whose books include, "It's All About the Bike," a bestselling memoir of craftsmanship. Penn joins us to speak out his new book, just out from W.W.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Steve McDonald, an artist and illustrator from Canada, about his new book, "Fantastic Cities: A Coloring Book of Amazing Places Real and Imagined." It's a striking collection of highly detailed line drawings depicting aerial views of real cities from around the world, both genuine and fictional. From New York, London, and Paris, to Istanbul, Tokyo, and Amsterdam, this large-format "coloring book for adults" combines arresting cityscapes with rather mind-bending and/or kaleidoscope-like close-ups of architectural details of all sorts.

Have you noticed the enormous, vivid, and woven tapestry draping the entire front facade of the 108 Contemporary gallery in downtown Tulsa? It's an installation that's been hanging for a few weeks now, and it's entitled "The Unbearable Absence of Landscape." This vast piece -- made of panels created by hundreds of knitters all over the state with plastic yarn that, if unraveled, would stretch over 160 miles -- will have its official opening tonight (the 4th) at 6pm at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in the Brady Arts District.

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Pepper Henry, who began his tenure as the executive director of the Gilcrease Museum about four months ago. As was recently reported by KWGS, Pepper Henry has requested $75 million out of  a proposed Vision 2025 sales-tax renewal.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

From now through February 26th, the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (in the downtown Brady Arts District) will present "Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate," a striking and wide-ranging exhibition collecting work by sixty different artists that first went on view in Helena, Montana, in 2008.

On today's show, we're discussing an interesting new exhibition that recently opened at the 108 Contemporary Gallery in Tulsa's Brady Arts District: "Twists and Turns" will be on display through October 26th. It's a craft exhibit of tapestries and ceramics that pairs -- for the first time ever -- two Israeli artists, Aleksandra Stoyanov and Zemer Peled, and it's actually the first "stop" in what will be a national tour for this show.

"Imagine. Design. Fabricate." Such is the tag line for the Hardesty Center for Fab Lab Tulsa. Fab Lab Tulsa, as it's commonly called, is -- per its website -- a nonprofit "entity that provides community access to advanced manufacturing and digital fabrication tools for learning skills, developing inventions, creating businesses, and producing personalized products. Fab Lab Tulsa is one of over 150 MIT-chartered Fab Labs in more than 40 countries and the first in the southeastern region of the United States.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with the mixed-media artist Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, who studied art at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and then at UCLA and now lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As is noted of this artist at her personal website: "[Gakunga's] works are predominantly wall-hanging sculptures created from tin cans, steel wire, and oxidized sheet metal forms.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.