Our guest on this edition of ST is Michael Blanding, an author and magazine writer who's also a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Reporting at Brandeis University. Blanding tells us about his newest book, just out, which is "The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps." As was appreciatively noted of this title by Kirkus Reviews, "The Map Thief" profiles the "strange, mysterious world of rare maps --- and the even stranger mystery of the man who stole them for years without getting caught.

Our guest on ST today is William Joyce, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, veteran New Yorker magazine cover artist, and all-around creative guru. Joyce's many picture books include "George Shrinks," "Dinosaur Bob," and "Santa Calls" --- and he won three Emmy Awards for his "Rolie Polie Olie" animated TV series.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with the Oklahoma City-based artist and curator, Nathan Lee. Lee is the curator of "Noir," a newly opened group show at the Living Arts space in downtown Tulsa which includes work from a number of different African-American artists from throughout Oklahoma --- and which will be on exhibit through July 11th. As is noted of this show at the Living Arts of Tulsa website: "'Noir' is an examination of the shifting definition of Black culture.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the distinctive films of writer/director Wes Anderson, whose vivid, detailed, and meticulously crafted movies include "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums," "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," and "Moonrise Kingdom" --- as well as "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is still in theaters nationwide. Our guest is Matt Zoller Seitz, a critic for New York magazine who has a new book out about Anderson's decidedly ornate cinematic world.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with the mixed-media artist Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, who studied art at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and then at UCLA and now lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As is noted of this artist at her personal website: "[Gakunga's] works are predominantly wall-hanging sculptures created from tin cans, steel wire, and oxidized sheet metal forms.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.

Once upon a time, museums throughout this country would invariably display or organize their "art" and their "Native American art" in two distinct categories; a piece would "belong" to one or the other camp, but never both. That's increasingly not the case anymore, thankfully --- and our guest today talks about why. We're pleased to welcome Rick West back to ST; he'll be the keynote speaker for a day-long Native Art Symposium tomorrow (Saturday the 5th) at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

"Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec --- Album" is a richly varied and lovely-to-look-at exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa through May 11th. As we read of this show at the Philbrook website: "Design is a complex process in which numerous problems must be solved. Yet even in the age of computers, drawing remains an indispensable tool for many designers, allowing them to capture spontaneous ideas on paper and develop an individual formal language.

On this installment of ST, we're discussing a terrific new art exhibit at TU's Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, located at 124 East Brady in Tulsa's downtown Brady Arts District: "Painted Faces" will be on view through April 20th. This show explores the work of ten outstanding artists --- from Kansas City, Connecticut, Texas, the U.K., and elsewhere --- all of whom use the human head as a regular element in their picture-making.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Leticia Bajuyo, an Indiana-based artist whose vast, mixed-media, and digital-disc-driven installation/sculpture called "Dual Wielding" is now on view at the Living Arts Gallery in downtown Tulsa; this work is being exhibited in connection with Living Arts New Genre Festival XXI, which runs through Saturday the 8th. Tonight, Friday the 7th --- as part of the Brady Arts District's "First Friday Art Crawl" --- "Dual Wielding" will have its opening reception, which begins at 6pm.