Art

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion that first aired in July, when we spoke with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. At that time, Philbrook had just opened an exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009." That show will close on Sunday the 7th.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Virginia Scotchie, an acclaimed ceramic artist and the area head of ceramics at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC. She exhibits her work extensively throughout the United States and abroad, and has received numerous awards for his creations. Scotchie is also the 2012 Red Heat juror; she herself won this competition several years ago. For this year's Red Heat show, she has selected approximately 60 ceramic pieces that will be on view in the Alexandre Hogue Gallery at TU through October 25th.

On this edition of ST, we speak with James Pace, an Oklahoma-born, Texas-based artist who has an exhibit on view at the University of Tulsa's Alexandre Hogue Gallery through September 20th. The show is called "Emblems from the Margin" --- and it includes mixed-media pieces as well as prints depicting various icons and recurring images. A professor of Visual Art at the University of Texas at Tyler since 1985, Pace is an artist who seems to emphasize symbolism, tactility, the American wilderness, and the narrative process itself in his work.

On this encore edition of ST, we hear from Anne-Marie O'Connor, a writer for The Washington Post (and formerly The Los Angeles Times), who tells us about her fascinating new work of nonfiction, "The Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt's Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer." This engaging story --- part history, part fairy-tale, part suspense yarn --- gives readers the biography, so to speak, of Klimt's famous rendering of Adele Bloch-Bauer, one of the most emblematic society portraits of its time; of the beautiful, seductive Viennese Jewish salon hostess who sat for

On this edition of ST, we speak with Teddy Cruz, the acclaimed architect and scholar --- he's an associate professor of Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego --- who will appear at a "Third Thursday" event at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa tomorrow night (the 16th) at 6pm. A 2010 profile of Cruz that appeared in T: The New York Times Style Magazine --- in which he was named as one of "the Nifty 50: America's up-and-coming talent" --- begins like so: "Most architects live to build.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we welcome back Scott Perkins, a curator at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, who tells us about a fine exhibit currently on view at the Price Tower called "From Process to Print: Graphic Works by Romare Bearden." Bearden (1911-1988) is widely regarded as one of the most important African-American artists this country has produced; he made art works in a range of media and was also a gifted writer, a cherished mentor to younger generations of artists, a tireless arts advocate, and a prominent intellectual and collaborator within the artistic/cu

On this installment of our program, we speak with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Philbrook has just opened a fascinating exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009," which will be on view through October 7th of this year. As Ross explains, this show originated at the Vitra Design Museum in Germany; it's the first of three exhibits from that museum which Philbrook will present over the next few years.

Our guest is Mark Lewis, the well-regarded Tulsa-based artist, and member of the University of Tulsa art faculty, whose paintings, drawings, and collage works have been shown in galleries nationwide. He's also been a longtime fixture on the sidewalks of 11th Street, Cherry Street, Brookside, and downtown, where he's been making paintings (and, more recently, collages) of this community's cityscapes for more than a dozen years.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Derry Noyes, an art diretor and graphic designer with the US Postal Service (you can read her bio here). Noyes was the art director a series of Forever US Postage stamps created in 2011 to salute such pioneering American industrial designers as Norman Bel Geddes, Russell Wright, Henry Dreyfuss, and Walter Dorwin Teague.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Ken Busby, the Executive Director and CEO of the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa (AHCT), which recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. As everyone who cares about the arts (and the ongoing presence of the arts) in this city knows already, the AHCT has been enriching the cultural life of our community ever since it began in 1961. And now, the ACHT is nearing the completion of its largest initiative ever, the new 42,000-square-foot Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa Hardesty Arts Center (or "AHHA"), which will open in the fall of this year.

On this edition of our show, we speak with the artist Joseph Velasquez, who has an MA and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the co-founder of the Dirty Printmakers of America, is a curator at the SlingShot Gallery (in Madison, WI), and is one of the creators/participants/educators behind Drive-By Press (which, per its website, is on a "mission to share [its] enthusiasm for printmaking with audiences everywhere.") Now based in Austin, Texas, Velasquez tells us that he began Drive-By Press in order to give demonstrations --- from the back of his truck --- of relief printing,

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is the New Mexico-based photographer Gus Foster, who's been capturing images with various panoramic cameras since the early 1970s. There's a new exhibit at Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum --- on view through October 7th of this year --- called "Panoramic Landscapes of the American West: Gus Foster's Views of this Broad Land." It's a collection a 20+ works that are as spectacular and sweeping as they are carefully executed and richly diverse: a series of color photographs of our western States that are 8, 10, or 12 feet in length.

On today's StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that first aired in November. At that time, we spoke with Lark Mason, an Asian art expert and longtime appraiser for "Antiques Roadshow," the popular public television program. Earlier last year, during an "Antiques Roadshow" taping here in Tulsa in July, Mason had valued a set of five 17th-century Chinese rhinoceros horn cups --- the property of Tulsa resident Doug Huber, who started collecting them in 1969 while on vacation in England (and who spent about $5,000 on acquiring them, over the years) --- at $1 to $1.5 million.

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