Art

Our guest is Mark Lewis, the well-regarded Tulsa-based artist, and member of the University of Tulsa art faculty, whose paintings, drawings, and collage works have been shown in galleries nationwide. He's also been a longtime fixture on the sidewalks of 11th Street, Cherry Street, Brookside, and downtown, where he's been making paintings (and, more recently, collages) of this community's cityscapes for more than a dozen years.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Derry Noyes, an art diretor and graphic designer with the US Postal Service (you can read her bio here). Noyes was the art director a series of Forever US Postage stamps created in 2011 to salute such pioneering American industrial designers as Norman Bel Geddes, Russell Wright, Henry Dreyfuss, and Walter Dorwin Teague.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Ken Busby, the Executive Director and CEO of the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa (AHCT), which recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. As everyone who cares about the arts (and the ongoing presence of the arts) in this city knows already, the AHCT has been enriching the cultural life of our community ever since it began in 1961. And now, the ACHT is nearing the completion of its largest initiative ever, the new 42,000-square-foot Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa Hardesty Arts Center (or "AHHA"), which will open in the fall of this year.

On this edition of our show, we speak with the artist Joseph Velasquez, who has an MA and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the co-founder of the Dirty Printmakers of America, is a curator at the SlingShot Gallery (in Madison, WI), and is one of the creators/participants/educators behind Drive-By Press (which, per its website, is on a "mission to share [its] enthusiasm for printmaking with audiences everywhere.") Now based in Austin, Texas, Velasquez tells us that he began Drive-By Press in order to give demonstrations --- from the back of his truck --- of relief printing,

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is the New Mexico-based photographer Gus Foster, who's been capturing images with various panoramic cameras since the early 1970s. There's a new exhibit at Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum --- on view through October 7th of this year --- called "Panoramic Landscapes of the American West: Gus Foster's Views of this Broad Land." It's a collection a 20+ works that are as spectacular and sweeping as they are carefully executed and richly diverse: a series of color photographs of our western States that are 8, 10, or 12 feet in length.

On today's StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that first aired in November. At that time, we spoke with Lark Mason, an Asian art expert and longtime appraiser for "Antiques Roadshow," the popular public television program. Earlier last year, during an "Antiques Roadshow" taping here in Tulsa in July, Mason had valued a set of five 17th-century Chinese rhinoceros horn cups --- the property of Tulsa resident Doug Huber, who started collecting them in 1969 while on vacation in England (and who spent about $5,000 on acquiring them, over the years) --- at $1 to $1.5 million.

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