Art

Ever flipped through a box of old photographs at a flea market --- or perhaps a soon-to-be-discarded album of family photos at a garage sale --- and then stopped to wonder, at some point, about a certain image: "Who are these people? Where did this come from? Who took this?

On this installment of ST, we chat with TU Professor of Art Emeritus Glenn Godsey, who's been giving classes in painting, watercolor, drawing, and digital media in the university's School of Art for the past 45 years. A man of quick wit, keen insight, casual manner, and wide-ranging tastes and interests, Godsey has enjoyed a successful career as both a teacher and practitioner of art; his many drawings, watercolors, paintings, digital prints, and photographs reveal his easy humor as well as his intellect, his humanity as well as his agile and associative mind.

Today we're pleased to share an interesting discussion with Barbara Grossman, the 2013 Ruth B. Mayo Distinguished Visiting Artist at the University of Tulsa's School of Art.

Back in 1938, the legendary local oilman Waite Phillips announced that he was giving his Italianate mansion --- and its surrounding 20-plus acres of uniformly gorgeous grounds --- to the citizens of Tulsa as an art museum and park space. Today, as has been the case all along, the Philbrook Museum of Art is an important and truly unique aspect of the art scene not just in our community but throughout this part of the nation.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Paul Davis, who grew up in Tulsa and then left for NYC (at age 17 or so) to study at the School of Visual Arts, and who, since the early 1960s, has been a highly regarded and quite recognizable illustrator and graphic artist. Just after his time in art school, Davis worked at the commercial art powerhouse known as Push Pin Studios --- and the theatrical posters that he created, mainly in the 1980s and 1990s, for The New York Shakespeare Festival for plays like "Three Penny Opera" and "Hamlet" are today seen as classics.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we present a conversation with artist Christopher Lowther, who is an assistant professor of Time-Based Media (a term that he's happy to define for us) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he's also on the faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

On today's show, we speak by phone with Dav Pilkey, the popular children's book author and illustrator who's probably best known for his "Captain Underpants" series of books. (There are ten books in this series --- Pilkey's now working on the 11th --- as well as a few different spin-off series.) Pilkey tells us about how his career got started, when the "Captain Underpants" character was actually born, and where some of his recurring ideas and themes as a writer and illustrator come from.

On today's StudioTulsa, we speak with Catherine Whitney, chief curator of the Philbrook Museum of Art, about the first two exhibitions at the museum's new Brady District facility. Philbrook Downtown is currently featuring a pair of exhibits concerning American art. The first, which was curated by Whitney, examines a group of female painters who worked in Santa Fe and Taos in the early 20th Century. "Sirens of the Southwest" draws on the resources of Philbrook's Eugene B.

Today on our program, we're discussing a new and exciting group show on display at Living Arts of Tulsa (at 307 East Brady) --- a wide-ranging exhibition that aims to "celebrate or critique the City of Tulsa." It's the "Oh, Tulsa!" Biennial, collecting works by one hundred of our community's finest artists --- both known and unknown --- and it opens tonight (Friday the 2nd) at the Living Arts space, from 6pm till 9pm; this opening gala is part of the Brady District's First Friday Art Crawl.

On this installment of ST, we are joined by Lauren Ross, the Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a group show now on exhibit at the museum, "Remainder," which will run through September 29th.

On this edition of our show, we offer an engaging, wide-ranging conversation with Heather Clark Hilliard, a fiber artist based in Norman, Oklahoma. Hilliard is also the inaugural artist-in-residence at 108 Contemporary gallery (located at 108 East Brady in Tulsa, and formerly known as the Brady Craft Alliance). She tells us about her solo show, "Finding the Fire: Concepts in Fiber," which will be on view at 108 through July 20th, with an Artist Talk scheduled to occur at the gallery on the 19th at 6pm.

This weekend --- beginning Friday the 14th --- the Tulsa community will welcome Philbrook Downtown, a new satellite space of the Philbrook Museum of Art, which was founded in 1938 and opened in 1939. Philbrook Downtown is a 30,000-square-foot, modern-style facility located in the city's vibrant Brady Arts District; it's comprised in a brick building that formerly housed a historic warehouse, and it's situated just steps away from several other newly created arts/cultural institutions in downtown Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of both the art and craft of making books. Our guest is Jody Williams, a Minneapolis-based book artist, printmaker, teacher, and writer. The (mostly miniature-sized) books that she creates as individual works of art appear under the name Flying Paper Press; books created by Williams have appeared in exhibits all over the country, and some are included in a group show currently on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art (through July 21st) called About Bookworks III.

Today on ST, a special interview from our archives as we listen back to a 1993 discussion with Charles Banks Wilson. The widely beloved artist died last week at 94. Wilson was born in Arkansas and grew up in Miami, Oklahoma; over the course of his long and prolific career, he worked as a painter, printmaker, art teacher, lecturer, historian, and magazine and book illustrator --- and his works are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery, the Oklahoma State Capitol, the Smithsonian, and other notable institutions.

On this installment on ST, we are pleased to welcome the classical-music husband-and-wife team of violinist Dylana Jenson and conductor-cellist David Lockington. Both will appear as special guests tomorrow night (Saturday the 6th) at the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall at 7:30pm, which is where and when the Tulsa Symphony will present its final "classics concert" of the current season; Jenson will be the Guest Soloist and Lockington, the Guest Conductor.

"Aphrodite and the Gods of Love" at Philbrook

Mar 20, 2013

Our guest for this edition of ST is Tanya Paul, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about "Aphrodite and the Gods of Love." It's a terrific new show that will be on view at Philbrook through May 26th.

(Please note: This program originally aired last year.) On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the author and writing instructor B. A. Shapiro about her widely praised novel, "The Art Forger." In 1990, more than a dozen works of art (today worth, in sum, $500+ million) were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, but in this equally fascinating and entertaining novel, our heroine --- Claire Roth, a struggling young artist --- learns more about this theft than she ever bargained for.

On this installment of our program, we speak by phone with the internationally known contemporary fiber artist, Jon Eric Riis, whose tapestry works can be found in private collections as well as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The New York Museum of Art and Design, The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Museum of Art, and elsewhere.

On this edition of our program, we offer a fascinating discussion concerning art, religion, and history with Dr. Clare Haynes of the University of Edinburgh. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 7th, Dr. Haynes will give the 2013 Rita and William H. Bell Distinguished Lecture at 7:30pm in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus. It's free and open to the public, and it's presented by the TU Department of Philosophy and Religion. The title for this lecture is "Resisting Affinities: The Visual Arts and the Church of England Since the Reformation." As Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the veteran artist James Grashow, born in Brooklyn in 1942, who's been creating an appealing, wide-ranging body of work since the 1960s. From large-scale environmental installations to album covers for Deep Purple and Jethro Tull to miniature "houseplants" (in which homes and buildings replace flowers and buds in intricately constructed bouquets), Grashow creates works that somehow thrive on both whimsy and decay, both wonder and mortality.

Our guest is Dr. Scott A. Shields, the associate director and chief curator at the Crocker Art Museum in California, who's also the chief curator for a traveling exhibit that will be on view at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa through March 24th. "Edgar Payne: The Scenic Journey" is a retrospective appreciation that features nearly 100 paintings and drawings, along with photographs, sculptures, and other objects from the artist's studio.

Our guest on this installment of ST is J.B. Kaufman, an author and film historian on the staff of the Walt Disney Family Foundation. He's just put out an extensively detailed and lavishly illustrated coffee-table book, "The Fairest One of All: The Making of Walt Disney's 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.'" This year marks the 75th anniversary of this classic film's initial release, and Kaufman's hefty volume explores every facet of the making of the film, with pages and pages of never-before-published facts and artwork.

On Sunday the 16th, from 1pm till 5pm, AHHA --- a/k/a the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa's Hardesty Arts Center --- will have its Grand Opening. Finishing touches are, even now, still being applied to the impressive space, which is to be located at 101 East Archer Street. Apart from introducing this most-welcome new arts facility to the public, the opening will also mark the inauguration of the first-ever exhibition at AHHA, which is the "Concept/OK" show, presented by the Oklahoma Visual Artists Coalition (or OVAC).

Our guest on this installment of ST is Ken Busby, the Executive Director and CEO of the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa, which is, per its website, the long-standing "champion of area arts and culture.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the renowned artist, art director, cartoonist, and illustrator Wayne White --- along with the filmmaker Neil Berkeley, who's directed a documentary about White's influential and still-thriving career, "Beauty Is Embarrassing." This film premiered at SXSW in Austin, Texas, earlier this year, and it will be screened tonight, the 15th, at the Philbrook Museum of Art (at a "Third Thursday" event, beginning at 5:30pm), and tomorrow night, Friday the 16th, at the Circle Cinema (at 6pm).

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the author and writing instructor B. A. Shapiro about her widely praised new novel, "The Art Forger." In 1990, more than a dozen works of art (today worth, in sum, $500+ million) were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, but in this equally fascinating and entertaining novel, our heroine --- Claire Roth, a struggling young artist --- learns more about this theft than she ever bargained for.

On today's edition of ST, an interesting discussion with the Ohio-based artist Cecile Baird, who is currently the ARTworks Featured Artist at Holland Hall School in Tulsa. A master of the colored-pencil medium, Baird has recently been working with art students at that school --- and several of her striking, well-rendered, nearly photo-realistic works will be on view at Holland Hall's Holliman Gallery (in the Walter Arts Center on the HH campus) through November 26th.

On today's show, an interesting discussion with Marc Masurovsky, who co-founded the Holocaust Art Restitution Project (HARP) in 1997. (He has served as HARP's Director of Research and is also a Board member.) An acknowledged expert in his field, Masurovsky has spent decades looking into various matters related to cultural assets that were looted or else sold under duress during the Holocaust and World War II; he's also served as an expert historian in a class-action lawsuit for Jewish claimants seeking restitution of lost accounts and other liquid assets from Swiss banks.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Marco Sassone, the award-winning Italian artist (b. 1942), who recently opened an exhibit at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville. "Marco Sassone: Architecture and Nature" will be on view at that museum through December 2nd. Born in a Tuscan village, raised and schooled in Florence, and later a resident of California for many years, the painter now resides in Toronto.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion that first aired in July, when we spoke with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. At that time, Philbrook had just opened an exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009." That show will close on Sunday the 7th.

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