Art

On this edition of our show, we're talking about buskers --- or, in other words, street performers. Whether it's by juggling, playing music, eating fire, doing magic tricks, enacting mime, or what-have-you, buskers take their creativity, theatricality, and pass-the-hat know-how directly to the streets, as it were --- and, as a socio-cultural phenomenon, they must be as old as cities themselves.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Michael Blanding, an author and magazine writer who's also a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Reporting at Brandeis University. Blanding tells us about his newest book, just out, which is "The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps." As was appreciatively noted of this title by Kirkus Reviews, "The Map Thief" profiles the "strange, mysterious world of rare maps --- and the even stranger mystery of the man who stole them for years without getting caught.

Our guest on ST today is William Joyce, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, veteran New Yorker magazine cover artist, and all-around creative guru. Joyce's many picture books include "George Shrinks," "Dinosaur Bob," and "Santa Calls" --- and he won three Emmy Awards for his "Rolie Polie Olie" animated TV series.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with the Oklahoma City-based artist and curator, Nathan Lee. Lee is the curator of "Noir," a newly opened group show at the Living Arts space in downtown Tulsa which includes work from a number of different African-American artists from throughout Oklahoma --- and which will be on exhibit through July 11th. As is noted of this show at the Living Arts of Tulsa website: "'Noir' is an examination of the shifting definition of Black culture.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the distinctive films of writer/director Wes Anderson, whose vivid, detailed, and meticulously crafted movies include "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums," "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," and "Moonrise Kingdom" --- as well as "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is still in theaters nationwide. Our guest is Matt Zoller Seitz, a critic for New York magazine who has a new book out about Anderson's decidedly ornate cinematic world.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with the mixed-media artist Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, who studied art at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and then at UCLA and now lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As is noted of this artist at her personal website: "[Gakunga's] works are predominantly wall-hanging sculptures created from tin cans, steel wire, and oxidized sheet metal forms.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.

Once upon a time, museums throughout this country would invariably display or organize their "art" and their "Native American art" in two distinct categories; a piece would "belong" to one or the other camp, but never both. That's increasingly not the case anymore, thankfully --- and our guest today talks about why. We're pleased to welcome Rick West back to ST; he'll be the keynote speaker for a day-long Native Art Symposium tomorrow (Saturday the 5th) at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

"Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec --- Album" is a richly varied and lovely-to-look-at exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa through May 11th. As we read of this show at the Philbrook website: "Design is a complex process in which numerous problems must be solved. Yet even in the age of computers, drawing remains an indispensable tool for many designers, allowing them to capture spontaneous ideas on paper and develop an individual formal language.

On this installment of ST, we're discussing a terrific new art exhibit at TU's Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, located at 124 East Brady in Tulsa's downtown Brady Arts District: "Painted Faces" will be on view through April 20th. This show explores the work of ten outstanding artists --- from Kansas City, Connecticut, Texas, the U.K., and elsewhere --- all of whom use the human head as a regular element in their picture-making.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Leticia Bajuyo, an Indiana-based artist whose vast, mixed-media, and digital-disc-driven installation/sculpture called "Dual Wielding" is now on view at the Living Arts Gallery in downtown Tulsa; this work is being exhibited in connection with Living Arts New Genre Festival XXI, which runs through Saturday the 8th. Tonight, Friday the 7th --- as part of the Brady Arts District's "First Friday Art Crawl" --- "Dual Wielding" will have its opening reception, which begins at 6pm.

Last month, it was announced that the University of Tulsa's McFarlin Library had acquired a rare, well-preserved copy of a large, handmade, and lavishly decorated book that's seen by many experts as one the most handsome illustrated books produced during the 20th century. Published by Golden Cockerel Press in 1931, "The Four Gospels" is a sterling example of the renaissance in artistry and craftsmanship in British book design/production that occurred in the late-19th and early-20th centuries.

A fine show recently opened at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Form and Line: Allan Houser's Sculpture and Drawings" will be on exhibit through June 29th. One of the most widely known and admired Native American artists of the 20th century, the Oklahoma-born Houser, who died at 80 in 1994, was a Chiricahua Apache sculptor, painter, and book illustrator. He was also a dedicated and highly influential teacher of art, most notably at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, NM.

Ever flipped through a box of old photographs at a flea market --- or perhaps a soon-to-be-discarded album of family photos at a garage sale --- and then stopped to wonder, at some point, about a certain image: "Who are these people? Where did this come from? Who took this?

On this installment of ST, we chat with TU Professor of Art Emeritus Glenn Godsey, who's been giving classes in painting, watercolor, drawing, and digital media in the university's School of Art for the past 45 years. A man of quick wit, keen insight, casual manner, and wide-ranging tastes and interests, Godsey has enjoyed a successful career as both a teacher and practitioner of art; his many drawings, watercolors, paintings, digital prints, and photographs reveal his easy humor as well as his intellect, his humanity as well as his agile and associative mind.

Today we're pleased to share an interesting discussion with Barbara Grossman, the 2013 Ruth B. Mayo Distinguished Visiting Artist at the University of Tulsa's School of Art.

Back in 1938, the legendary local oilman Waite Phillips announced that he was giving his Italianate mansion --- and its surrounding 20-plus acres of uniformly gorgeous grounds --- to the citizens of Tulsa as an art museum and park space. Today, as has been the case all along, the Philbrook Museum of Art is an important and truly unique aspect of the art scene not just in our community but throughout this part of the nation.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Paul Davis, who grew up in Tulsa and then left for NYC (at age 17 or so) to study at the School of Visual Arts, and who, since the early 1960s, has been a highly regarded and quite recognizable illustrator and graphic artist. Just after his time in art school, Davis worked at the commercial art powerhouse known as Push Pin Studios --- and the theatrical posters that he created, mainly in the 1980s and 1990s, for The New York Shakespeare Festival for plays like "Three Penny Opera" and "Hamlet" are today seen as classics.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we present a conversation with artist Christopher Lowther, who is an assistant professor of Time-Based Media (a term that he's happy to define for us) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he's also on the faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

On today's show, we speak by phone with Dav Pilkey, the popular children's book author and illustrator who's probably best known for his "Captain Underpants" series of books. (There are ten books in this series --- Pilkey's now working on the 11th --- as well as a few different spin-off series.) Pilkey tells us about how his career got started, when the "Captain Underpants" character was actually born, and where some of his recurring ideas and themes as a writer and illustrator come from.

On today's StudioTulsa, we speak with Catherine Whitney, chief curator of the Philbrook Museum of Art, about the first two exhibitions at the museum's new Brady District facility. Philbrook Downtown is currently featuring a pair of exhibits concerning American art. The first, which was curated by Whitney, examines a group of female painters who worked in Santa Fe and Taos in the early 20th Century. "Sirens of the Southwest" draws on the resources of Philbrook's Eugene B.

Today on our program, we're discussing a new and exciting group show on display at Living Arts of Tulsa (at 307 East Brady) --- a wide-ranging exhibition that aims to "celebrate or critique the City of Tulsa." It's the "Oh, Tulsa!" Biennial, collecting works by one hundred of our community's finest artists --- both known and unknown --- and it opens tonight (Friday the 2nd) at the Living Arts space, from 6pm till 9pm; this opening gala is part of the Brady District's First Friday Art Crawl.

On this installment of ST, we are joined by Lauren Ross, the Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a group show now on exhibit at the museum, "Remainder," which will run through September 29th.

On this edition of our show, we offer an engaging, wide-ranging conversation with Heather Clark Hilliard, a fiber artist based in Norman, Oklahoma. Hilliard is also the inaugural artist-in-residence at 108 Contemporary gallery (located at 108 East Brady in Tulsa, and formerly known as the Brady Craft Alliance). She tells us about her solo show, "Finding the Fire: Concepts in Fiber," which will be on view at 108 through July 20th, with an Artist Talk scheduled to occur at the gallery on the 19th at 6pm.

This weekend --- beginning Friday the 14th --- the Tulsa community will welcome Philbrook Downtown, a new satellite space of the Philbrook Museum of Art, which was founded in 1938 and opened in 1939. Philbrook Downtown is a 30,000-square-foot, modern-style facility located in the city's vibrant Brady Arts District; it's comprised in a brick building that formerly housed a historic warehouse, and it's situated just steps away from several other newly created arts/cultural institutions in downtown Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of both the art and craft of making books. Our guest is Jody Williams, a Minneapolis-based book artist, printmaker, teacher, and writer. The (mostly miniature-sized) books that she creates as individual works of art appear under the name Flying Paper Press; books created by Williams have appeared in exhibits all over the country, and some are included in a group show currently on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art (through July 21st) called About Bookworks III.

Today on ST, a special interview from our archives as we listen back to a 1993 discussion with Charles Banks Wilson. The widely beloved artist died last week at 94. Wilson was born in Arkansas and grew up in Miami, Oklahoma; over the course of his long and prolific career, he worked as a painter, printmaker, art teacher, lecturer, historian, and magazine and book illustrator --- and his works are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery, the Oklahoma State Capitol, the Smithsonian, and other notable institutions.

On this installment on ST, we are pleased to welcome the classical-music husband-and-wife team of violinist Dylana Jenson and conductor-cellist David Lockington. Both will appear as special guests tomorrow night (Saturday the 6th) at the Tulsa PAC's Chapman Music Hall at 7:30pm, which is where and when the Tulsa Symphony will present its final "classics concert" of the current season; Jenson will be the Guest Soloist and Lockington, the Guest Conductor.

"Aphrodite and the Gods of Love" at Philbrook

Mar 20, 2013

Our guest for this edition of ST is Tanya Paul, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about "Aphrodite and the Gods of Love." It's a terrific new show that will be on view at Philbrook through May 26th.

(Please note: This program originally aired last year.) On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the author and writing instructor B. A. Shapiro about her widely praised novel, "The Art Forger." In 1990, more than a dozen works of art (today worth, in sum, $500+ million) were stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It remains the largest unsolved art heist in history, but in this equally fascinating and entertaining novel, our heroine --- Claire Roth, a struggling young artist --- learns more about this theft than she ever bargained for.

Pages