Art Criticism

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Steve Liggett back to our program. A well-known figure on the local arts scene, Liggett is an art teacher and sculptor who's also the director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa, which was established in the 1960s by Virginia Myers and others as a haven for the creation and display of contemporary art right here in T-Town.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which was established last year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to both enrich and expand the local art scene by recruiting artists from all over the nation to the Tulsa area. This fellowship, per its website, "provides an unrestricted stipend, free housing, and work-space in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to US Resident artists.... The Fellows are expected to integrate into the local arts community, such as [via] studio and collection visits.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded contemporary American painter and artist, Susanna Coffey, who is currently speaking/teaching at the University of Tulsa as a Ruth Mayo Memorial Distinguished Visiting Artist.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about "Native Fashion Now," a traveling exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum here in Tulsa through January 8, 2017. Our guest is Christina Burke, the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at Philbrook, who tells us how this show thoroughly and engagingly blends cutting-edge/modern-day fashion with classic Native American iconography/imagery. And further, per the Philbrook website: "Visitors are invited to explore the rich and surprising realm of contemporary Native fashion.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to our studios Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Philbrook is offering a fascinating new show -- on view through August 28th -- entitled "A Place in the Sun: The Southwest Paintings of Walter Ufer and E.

On this edition of ST, we speak with A.O. Scott, chief film critic at The New York Times. Scott has a new book out; it's called "Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This stunning treatise on criticism from...Scott is a complete success, comprehensively demonstrating the value of his art.

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Frédéric Brenner, an internationally acclaimed photographer who's best known for this documentation of Jewish communities around the world. His photographs have been shown at (among other prestigious venues) the International Center of Photography in New York, the Musée de l'Élysée in Lausanne, and the Joods Historisch Museum in Amsterdam.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art, "The Essence of Things: Design and the Art of Reduction," which will be on view through May 1st. Our guest is Sienna Brown, who was appointed the Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at Philbrook about six months ago. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "This exhibition celebrates simplicity in design.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a new exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain" will be on view through April 24th. Featuring more than 100 art works, including sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, mixed media pieces, and the giant pastels for which Bartow is best known, the exhibit draws from both public and private collections -- including the artist's own studio.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and previously wrote for The New York Times.

"Untitled, 2015" by Joe Andoe

On this presentation of StudioTulsa, an enjoyable discussion with the acclaimed artist, Joe Andoe, who is based in New York City and grew up in Tulsa, and whose works are still very much informed by the look and feel of certain parts of our community. (Indeed, on our show today, he refers to East Tulsa as his "muse.") Andoe has a new exhibit on view in Tulsa, which opened last week at Aberson Exhibits on Brookside (near 35th and Peoria).

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Friese, a visual artist and former Tulsan whose paintings, prints, and etchings are now on display in the Alexandre Hogue Gallery on the TU campus; this exhibit features beautifully rendered landscapes created in open-air settings in both Rhode Island and North Dakota. The show will be on view through December 17th.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

In 1963, the up-and-coming pop artist Andy Warhol took a road trip across America, from New York to Los Angeles.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a vivid and exciting new exhibition at Philbrook, "In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation," which will be on view through January 17, 2016. Mr. Schnitzer is our guest today.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly opened exhibit at Gilcrease, "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley," which will be on view through January 3rd. As is noted of this show at the Gilcrease Museum website: "More than 150 years after his Smithsonian gallery burned to the ground, John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective exhibition.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the poet and performance/conceptual artist, Kenneth Goldsmith, who has appeared on The Colbert Report, held a poetry reading in the White House, and published more than ten books. He's also the first-ever poet laureate to be selected by The Museum of Modern Art -- and he'll offer a free-to-the-public poetry reading tonight, Tuesday the 22nd, at 9pm in Tyrell Hall on the TU campus.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the charmingly off-the-wall and/or downright ghoulish cartoons of Charles Addams, whose distictive, humorous drawings graced the pages of The New Yorker (and other magazines) for many years, and were the basis, of course, for "The Addams Family" (of TV and movie fame). More than 50 works by Addams are now on display at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education in downtown Tulsa; "Charles Addams: Family and Friends" will be on view through September 27th.

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Pepper Henry, who began his tenure as the executive director of the Gilcrease Museum about four months ago. As was recently reported by KWGS, Pepper Henry has requested $75 million out of  a proposed Vision 2025 sales-tax renewal.

Summertime...and the living is...cultured. On this edition of ST, we welcome Rand Suffolk back to the program. As the Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, Suffolk tells us about the various events and shows comprising that museum's "All-Star Summer." These include the exhibitions "The Figure Examined" and "The Art of Ceremony" -- both of which will be on view at the main Philbrook campus through early September -- and certain exhibits now happening (or coming soon) to the Philbrook Downtown space, among them a show that Suffolk himself curated.

We offer a chat with Donald MacDonald, a San Francisco-based architect with 40+ years of experience in architecture, planning, contract documents, and construction management. He was the major architect of the Bay Bridge's Eastern span, redesigned elements of the Golden Gate Bridge, and has designed bridges across the U.S. as well as internationally -- and he also, way back when, studied with famed architect Bruce Goff at the University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion about a great new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation" will on view through September 13th. Sarah Lees, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at Philbrook -- and the curator for this exhibit -- joins us.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a gorgeous new show at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum" opens on Sunday (the 3rd) and runs through September 6th. Our guest is the curator for this traveling exhibition, Jean Stern, who is the founding executive director of The Irvine Museum (in Irvine, CA).

On this edition of ST, we welcome James Warhola (born 1955), an American artist and illustrator who's created more than two dozen children's picture books over the years. Warhola briefly worked at Interview magazine in New York City -- which was established and edited by Andy Warhol, his uncle -- before becoming a science fiction illustrator. As such, beginning in the early 1980s, he did the cover art for hundreds of sci-fi books, and he was later an artist and illustrator for Mad magazine.

From just after WWII until the late 1970s, the Indian Annual exhibition at Tulsa's Philbrook Museum of Art served as a vital outlet -- and a nationally recognized showcase -- for Native American fine art. This juried competition and sale attracted artists, collectors, and curators from across the country for more than three decades. It also helped build the collections of institutions like Philbrook, the Heard Museum (AZ), and the Museum of the American Indian (NY), all of which consistently purchased award-winning pieces at this show.

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