Architecture

Lots of talk these days, as we all know, about "building that wall." But what about the borderwall that already exists between much of the U.S. and Mexico? And what about the cultures, events, art works, communities, and lives that are associated with this borderwall -- that is, with the various walls and fences running between these two countries? Our guest is Ronald Rael, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Architecture and Art Practice at the University of California, Berkeley.

Without question, Americans today appreciate good/sturdy design or historic/innovative architecture more than ever before. The Architecture & Design Film Festival, which dates back to 2009, is rooted in this widespread appreciation. It's a festival that usually plays in big cities all over the globe -- NYC, say, or Seoul, South Korea -- but this weekend, from April 20th through the 23rd, the Architecture & Design Film Festival will be screened at the Circle Cinema here in Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer a chat with Douglas Miller, the principal behind Müllerhaus Legacy, a Tulsa-based firm that creates books and other publications on-demand for private organizations and special occasions. A graphic artist and book designer by trade, Miller is also, in fact, a writer, since a book for which he's the lead author has just recently appeared.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Doug Henderson, an architectural photographer based here in Tulsa who has photographed, starting back in 2010, many different forts and castles along the coast of West Africa where, from the 1600s to the early 1800s, European traders imprisoned slaves until ships could carry them to the New World. Through these grim and rather under-documented structures, more than 12 million people passed in their shameful journey to slavery.

So many attractive and impressive old buildings -- in downtown Tulsa and across this state -- would still be gathering dust, housing pigeons, and contributing even less economically without the Historic Tax Credit (HTC) program. Indeed, HTC projects have injected $163 million in private investment into the City of Tulsa alone since 2000. On this edition of ST, we speak in detail about the positive economic influence that historic preservation tax credits have had (and are still having) in our city and throughout the Sooner State.

Last night, at an event here in Tulsa, Preservation Oklahoma and the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture jointly announced the 2016 list of the state's Most Endangered Places. The list includes the Oklahoma State Capitol Building as well as two locations in Tulsa: the Oklahoma Iron Works Building (just northeast of downtown) and the mid-century Abundant Life Building (near 18th and Boulder). However, the ten sites on this year's list are not the only historic-preservation sites endangered in our state.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to speak once again with the artist P.S. Gordon (born in 1953 in Claremore, Oklahoma). Gordon is an artist mainly known for his rich, vividly precise watercolors of flowers -- and, per his website, he "gained national attention with a series of solo exhibitions, beginning in 1982, at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City, and Joseph Gierek Fine Art in his then-adopted hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and previously wrote for The New York Times.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Steve McDonald, an artist and illustrator from Canada, about his new book, "Fantastic Cities: A Coloring Book of Amazing Places Real and Imagined." It's a striking collection of highly detailed line drawings depicting aerial views of real cities from around the world, both genuine and fictional. From New York, London, and Paris, to Istanbul, Tokyo, and Amsterdam, this large-format "coloring book for adults" combines arresting cityscapes with rather mind-bending and/or kaleidoscope-like close-ups of architectural details of all sorts.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

Interested in the idea of living in downtown Tulsa? Curious about all the apartment buildings and office spaces that seem to getting refurbished or constructed downtown these days? Wondering about what might be in store for a certain vacant property or unsightly parking lot within the City of Tulsa's Inner Dispersal Loop? If you've answered in the affirmative to any or all of these queries, you might want to check out the 3rd Annual Dwell in the IDL Tour, which will be presented by the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture this coming Sunday, the 4th, from noon to 5pm.

We offer a chat with Donald MacDonald, a San Francisco-based architect with 40+ years of experience in architecture, planning, contract documents, and construction management. He was the major architect of the Bay Bridge's Eastern span, redesigned elements of the Golden Gate Bridge, and has designed bridges across the U.S. as well as internationally -- and he also, way back when, studied with famed architect Bruce Goff at the University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Christine Madrid French, a Florida-based architectural historian, historic preservation advocate, and author. (You can read about her many and various projects and publications as an architect with a passion for the past at French's website.) French will deliver a presentation called "Saving the Modern Century" tonight, Thursday the 21st, at 5:30pm at the Phlibrook Museum of Art.

On this installment of ST, we chat with TU Professor of Art Emeritus Glenn Godsey, who's been giving classes in painting, watercolor, drawing, and digital media in the university's School of Art for the past 45 years. A man of quick wit, keen insight, casual manner, and wide-ranging tastes and interests, Godsey has enjoyed a successful career as both a teacher and practitioner of art; his many drawings, watercolors, paintings, digital prints, and photographs reveal his easy humor as well as his intellect, his humanity as well as his agile and associative mind.

What makes for the creation of a structural or architectural icon? Is it strictly a matter of design? Or do both design and engineering play a role? And what about the location or environment surrounding a given structure --- how might they be involved? We explore such questions with our guest, Donald MacDonald, the noted bridge architect. Born in Canada and based for many years in San Francisco, MacDonald has designed high-rise buildings, landmark homes, and even an earthquake-proof bed.

(Note: This show originally aired earlier this year.) If you're something of a daredevil, and further, if you've ever wondered what it'd be like to climb to the top of the Brooklyn Bridge --- or wander amid the catacombs beneath Paris, or maybe just take an up-close look at a "ghost station" within the far-reaching New York City subway system --- you might be a latent "urban explorer." Our guest is an active explorer of this sort; Moses Gates, who joins us by phone, is also an urban planner, a licensed New York City tour guide, and an assistant professor of demography at the Pratt Institute

"Hidden Cities: A Memoir of Urban Exploration"

Mar 27, 2013

If you're something of a daredevil, and further, if you've ever wondered what it'd be like to climb to the top of the Brooklyn Bridge --- or wander amid the catacombs beneath Paris, or maybe just take an up-close look at a "ghost station" within the far-reaching New York City subway system --- you might be a latent "urban explorer." Our guest on ST is an active explorer of this sort; Moses Gates, who joins us by phone, is also an urban planner, a licensed New York City tour guide, and an assistant professor of demography at the Pratt Institute.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Teddy Cruz, the acclaimed architect and scholar --- he's an associate professor of Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego --- who will appear at a "Third Thursday" event at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa tomorrow night (the 16th) at 6pm. A 2010 profile of Cruz that appeared in T: The New York Times Style Magazine --- in which he was named as one of "the Nifty 50: America's up-and-coming talent" --- begins like so: "Most architects live to build.