American Culture

StudioTulsa
5:08 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Appearing at Philbrook, the Noted California-Based Architect Teddy Cruz

Aired on Wednesday, August 15th.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Teddy Cruz, the acclaimed architect and scholar --- he's an associate professor of Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego --- who will appear at a "Third Thursday" event at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa tomorrow night (the 16th) at 6pm. A 2010 profile of Cruz that appeared in T: The New York Times Style Magazine --- in which he was named as one of "the Nifty 50: America's up-and-coming talent" --- begins like so: "Most architects live to build.

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StudioTulsa
5:00 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Meet Amy Wells, a Hollywood Set Decorator Who Worked on "Mad Men" (Encore presentation.)

Aired on Tuesday, August 14th.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a conversation with Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells did an event here in Tulsa (at the Philbrook Museum of Art) back in May; at that time, she stopped by our studios to talk about her interesting work on AMC's "Mad Men" --- a critically acclaimed show that's routinely praised as much for its costumes

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StudioTulsa
1:17 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Novelist and Scholar (and Former Tulsan) Michael Hightower on His New Novel: "The Pattersons"

Aired on Friday, August 3rd.

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, we're pleased to welcome back an old friend, Michael Hightower, who lived and worked in Tulsa for about two decades, starting in 1980, and who, for most of that time, owned and presided over Council Oak Books. Now based in Charlottesville, Virginia, Hightower joins us to talk about his new novel, "The Pattersons," a work of historical fiction as well as modern-day sociological commentary that occasionally draws on Hightower's own life story.

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StudioTulsa
2:23 pm
Mon July 30, 2012

"How the Lone Star State Hijacked the American Agenda"

Aired on Monday, July 30th.

"Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger," the former President George W. Bush once remarked to an appreciative audience, "which, in Texas, is called 'walking.'" It's pretty clear to just about everyone that the State of Texas sees itself as a breed apart in many ways, and for many reasons; Texans, as a rule, seem to consider their home state an exceptional, singular, not-to-be-messed-with place.

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StudioTulsa
4:08 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

At the Price Tower Arts Center: "Graphic Works by Romare Bearden"

Aired on Wednesday, July 25th.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we welcome back Scott Perkins, a curator at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, who tells us about a fine exhibit currently on view at the Price Tower called "From Process to Print: Graphic Works by Romare Bearden." Bearden (1911-1988) is widely regarded as one of the most important African-American artists this country has produced; he made art works in a range of media and was also a gifted writer, a cherished mentor to younger generations of artists, a tireless arts advocate, and a prominent intellectual and collaborator within the artistic/cu

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StudioTulsa
5:27 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

A Glimpse Inside the Department of Special Collections at TU's McFarlin Library

Aired on Monday, July 23rd.

Earlier this month, in the pages of The New York Times Book Review, the acclaimed American historian Douglas Brinkley and the accomplished Hollywood actor Johnny Depp offered a co-written essay that made at least two rather surprising announcements.

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StudioTulsa
3:21 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

"Origins of the Cigarette Catastrophe and the Case for Abolition"

Aired on Friday, July 20th.

How many cigarettes are sold each year, worldwide? Believe it or not, six trillion. Our guest, who calls the cigarette "the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization," was the first-ever historian, several years ago, to testify in court against Big Tobacco. On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University.

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StudioTulsa
12:54 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Liza Mundy Details a Major Cultural Shift: Women as Primary Breadwinners (Encore presentation.)

Aired on Tuesday, July 10th.

(Note: This show first aired back in April.) A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

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StudioTulsa
4:07 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

"1913 Massacre" --- A Woody Guthrie Ballad, a Little-Known American Tragedy, and a New Documentary

Aired on Monday, July 9th.
File Photo

"1913 Massacre" is the name of a song that Woody Guthrie wrote circa 1941; it recounts an early-20th-century tragedy that happened at the Italian Hall building in Calumet, Michigan, on Christmas Eve of 1913, when hundreds of miners, along with their families and friends, had gathered for a party. At that time, Calumet was at the heart of Michigan's then-lucrative copper-mining activity.

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StudioTulsa
5:05 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

"Blind but Now I See: The Biography of Music Legend Doc Watson"

Aired on Thursday, July 5th.

On this installment of ST, we're looking back on the life and music of the late Doc Watson, who died in May at the age of 89. Watson was a truly legendary guitarist and singer whose work in the realms of folk, bluegrass, country, blues, and gospel music won him several Grammy Awards and universal acclaim. Despite being blind from infancy, he had a long and highly influential career; his guitar-playing (and especially his flat-picking skills) as well as his vast knowledge of traditional American music were, and still are, considered unequaled.

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