Africa

On this edition of ST, we speak with Herb Boyd, an award-winning journalist and historian who's also the author of several books on black history and activism, including biographies of James Baldwin and Sugar Ray Robinson; his latest book is a remarkable 300-year history of African-American life and politics in his hometown of Detroit. Boyd, who now teaches at the City College of New York, will be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight, the 12th, at 7pm here at TU.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the USSR-born writer Anna Badkhen, whose well-regarded books of nonfiction include "Walking with Abel: Journeys with the Nomads of the African Savannah," "The World Is a Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village," and "Waiting for the Taliban: A Journey Through Northern Afghanistan." She's written about wars and warfare -- and about living with warfare -- in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, and Chechnya, and her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, The New Republic, Foreign Policy, and elsewhere.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Tony Bartelme. He is a senior projects reporter for the Post and Courier (of Charleston, South Carolina), and his new book is a nonfiction study called "A Surgeon in the Village: An American Doctor Teaches Brain Surgery in Africa." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "[Here is] the story of an American brain surgeon in Tanzania and the work he has done to develop surgeons in the East African country.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Jose Ramos-Horta, the former president of Timor-Leste (a/k/a East Timor) in Southeast Asia. Ramos-Horta also chairs the U.N. High Level Independent Panel on U.N. Peace Operations, and he was a co-recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize for Peace. He recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "U.N. Peace Operations: Have They Really Brought the World Closer to Peace?" -- and he stopped by our KWGS to speak about this when he was here.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Doug Henderson, an architectural photographer based here in Tulsa who has photographed, starting back in 2010, many different forts and castles along the coast of West Africa where, from the 1600s to the early 1800s, European traders imprisoned slaves until ships could carry them to the New World. Through these grim and rather under-documented structures, more than 12 million people passed in their shameful journey to slavery.

In the pre-9/11 past, threats to international security could usually be attributed to this or that "dangerous" or "unstable" nation-state. Today, however, such threats are quite often attributed not to nation-states, but to "non-state actors" like Boko Haram, Al-Qaeda, or the Islamic State (IS). We're speaking about this dramatic shift in thinking -- and in action, and in policy -- with Dr. Dan Caldwell, a professor of political science at Pepperdine University’s Seaver College. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Chris Gates, who is CEO of the Tulsa-based Janada L. Batchelor Foundation for Children, or JBFC, a nonprofit that works to provide aid to, and combat extreme poverty in, East Africa. As noted on the JBFC website: "Janada Batchelor is JBFC Founder Chris Gates's grandmother. The organization carries her name because she is the woman who introduced Gates to Tanzania in 2002.

On this installment of ST, we hear from a career foreign service officer about the two largest democracies in Africa, each dealing with conflicts that will continue to have consequences for the U.S. Our guest is Ambassador John Campbell, the Ralph Bunche Senior Fellow for Africa Policy Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. (Previously, from 1975 to 2007, Ambassador Campbell served as a U.S.

Born in Spain and raised by a struggling single mother, Lisa Lovatt-Smith became an editor at British Vogue at age nineteen, the youngest in that magazine's history. By her thirties, Lisa had achieved her dream career and an absolutely glamorous life in Paris. But then her adopted daughter Sabrina was expelled from school, and Lisa took her to volunteer at an orphanage in Ghana with the hope of getting Sabrina's life back on track. What mother and daughter discovered there changed both their lives.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Tom Garrett, an Oklahoma native who's worked at the International Republican Institute (or IRI) since 1994.

We are pleased to welcome Katherine S. Newman back to our show. She's the Dean of Arts and Sciences as well as a professor of sociology at the Johns Hopkins University, and she's also the author of several books on poverty, the working poor, and the consequences of inequality, including "The Accordion Family" and "The Missing Class." Newman speaks with us about her newest book, which she co-authored.

On today's ST, we speak with Amanda Lindhout, who formerly worked around the globe as a freelance journalist and photographer, and who now runs the Global Enrichment Foundation, a non-profit organization --- which she founded about four years ago --- supporting development, aid, and education initiatives in Somalia and Kenya. Lindout speaks with us about her recently published memoir, which she co-wrote with Sara Corbett, and which has been getting some stellar reviews.

"Running the Rift: A Novel"

Jan 4, 2013

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Naomi Benaron about her debut novel, "Running the Rift," which appeared in soft-cover back in October, and which was awarded the Bellwether Prize in 2010 (which is given biennially to an unpublished novel that confronts social issues). "Running the Rift" is set in Rwanda; it begins in 1994 and runs, as a narrative, through 1998. Thus it takes place in a country that knew horrific genocide in a devastatingly hellish conflict that pitted neighbor against neighbor.