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Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. To hear the most recent broadcast, or search the All Things Considered archives, click here.

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Law
5:59 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Former House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert Indicted By Federal Grand Jury

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
5:41 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Cholera Surges In Haiti As Rain Arrives Early

Health workers collect the body of a cholera victim in Petionville, Haiti, February 2011. The cholera outbreak in Haiti began in October 2010. Nearly 9,000 people have died.
David Gilkey/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

At a government-run clinic in Diquini, near Port-au-Prince, doctors are treating a handful of cholera patients.

One of them is Givenchi Predelus. For five days, the high school sophomore has been lying on a cot with a towel over his midsection and an IV in his arm, listening to tinny music on his bare-bones cellphone.

Predelus speaks in a whisper, a sign of what cholera has done to his strength. "Only one other person in my area has cholera," he says, through an interrupter. "She sells patties on the side of the road. I'm the second victim."

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The Salt
5:15 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Cod Comeback: How The North Sea Fishery Bounced Back From The Brink

Fish for sale in the fish market in Fraserburgh, Scotland.
Ari Shapiro/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

Cod love the icy cold waters of the North Sea — and British people love eating cod.

But a decade ago, it looked like people were eating the fish to the brink of collapse. Now the trend has turned around, and the cod are coming back.

We pick up this fish tale, which seems to be on its way to a happy ending, at an early morning fish auction in Fraserburgh, Scotland, where buyers and sellers are lined up alongside hundreds of boxes containing cod, hake, monkfish, sole and every other kind of fish you can imagine from the North Sea.

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U.S.
5:15 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

For Juvenile Sex Offenders, State Registries Create Lifetime Of Problems

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

Forrest Hampton is about to become a family man and he couldn't be happier. He's 25 and he lives in a suburb of Dallas with his fiancée, who's due to have their baby practically any minute. They've already picked out a name: Raven.

In most ways they are a normal family. Except for one thing. Until last year, Hampton was a registered sex offender.

"I honestly don't believe I was supposed to be registered in the first place," he says, "but I wasn't in the position to fight my case."

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Shots - Health News
4:32 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

A security fence surrounds the main part of the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground, a testing laboratory in the Utah desert. The Army says it mistakenly shipped live anthrax from Dugway to several labs in the U.S. and Korea.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still trying to figure out how the military managed to ship anthrax spores that were apparently live from one of its facilities to more than a dozen labs across the United States.

"We have a team at the [military] lab to determine what may have led to this incident," says CDC spokesman Jason McDonald. In addition, he says, the agency is working with health officials in nine states to make sure the potentially live samples are safely disposed of and the labs affected are decontaminated.

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Book News & Features
4:25 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

As Publishing Industry Courts China, Authors Speak Out Against Censorship

Protesters gathered on the steps of the New York Public Library on Wednesday to show support for silenced Chinese writers.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 7:58 am

Chinese writers and publishers are being celebrated this week in New York at BookExpo America — the industry's largest trade event in North America. Organizers of the event say China deserves a seat at the table because it is such a big and potentially lucrative market. But some authors and free speech advocates have seen this as an opportunity to shine light on censorship in China.

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National Security
4:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Foreign Policy Experts Weigh In On U.S. Strategy Against The Islamic State

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Business
5:20 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

On The Road To Recovery, Detroit's Property Taxes Aren't Helping

Detroit is attracting entrepreneurs who like the relatively cheap workspaces. But real estate developers and business owners like Sean Harrington, who turned the Iodent Building into an apartment complex, are paying the price in property taxes.
Jason Margolis NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:45 am

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there's a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail.

A great thing about the city is that it's easy to become a real estate mogul. But some entrepreneurs might have reason to pause.

A new study released Tuesday shows that Detroit's commercial property taxes are the highest of any city in the nation.

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Music Interviews
5:08 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

When This 9-Year-Old Pianist Plays, He Feels The Music

Oscar Paz Suaznabar started playing keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The now 9-year-old pianist has played at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Courtesy Oscar Paz Suaznabar

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 7:31 am

When Oscar Paz Suaznabar plays the piano, he does so with feeling.

The Alexandria, Va., resident has played at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and on the NPR show From the Top. He is 9 years old.

Oscar started playing his older sister's keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The sorrow he conveys when he plays "The Lark" by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka is drawn from the kind of loss any 9-year-old can understand.

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Politics
5:06 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Nebraska Legislators Overturn Governor's Veto Of Death Penalty Repeal

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 6:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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