Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways to Connect

"Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec --- Album" is a richly varied and lovely-to-look-at exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa through May 11th. As we read of this show at the Philbrook website: "Design is a complex process in which numerous problems must be solved. Yet even in the age of computers, drawing remains an indispensable tool for many designers, allowing them to capture spontaneous ideas on paper and develop an individual formal language.

Tulsa Jail

Prison overcrowding is, unfortunately, a well-known nationwide phenomenon. It's also a familiar and quite serious problem here in our own backyard, as it were, and thus many local residents feel that if we don't step up and take action, it's only going to worsen --- that is, it'll go from very bad to even worse. On Tuesday, April 1st, Tulsa County voters will be asked to consider two sales-tax initiatives.

Our guest on ST is Anne Hyde, the William R. Hochman Professor of History at Colorado College. She'll be giving the 2014 H.G. Barnard Distinguished Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, tonight (Tuesday the 25th) at the Gilcrease Museum Auditorium here in Tulsa. The lecture begins at the 7pm and is free to the public. Prof. Hyde, who mainly teaches courses on the history of Native America as well as that of North America, received her A.B. degree in American Studies from Mount Holyoke College and her M.A.

Each year, the University of Tulsa's Presidential Lecture Series hosts distinguished speakers on a range of fascinating topics; all lectures are free to the public. The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by The Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair and supported by the University's Office of the Provost. TU's next Presidential Lecturer will be Frank Wilczek, the well-known theoretical physicist and mathematician who's also a professor at MIT. Wilczek's talk begins at 7:30pm on Thursday the 27th; it happens in the Reynolds Center, at 3208 East 8th Street, and reservations are not required.

The Elias String Quartet --- currently comprised of Sara Bitlloch, Donald Grant, Martin Saving, and Marie Bitlloch --- is one of the more widely acclaimed "younger" quartets on today's classical scene. They perform around the world, collaborating with many different artists across a range of styles and backgrounds; they formed in 1998 at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Craig Nelson --- who's written for Vanity Fair, Salon, Popular Science, and other periodicals, and who's the bestselling author of "Rocket Men" as well as a biography of Thomas Paine --- about his newest book, which is a meticulous and consistently engrossing cultural history of the Atomic Age. "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era" is, as was noted by Kirkus Reviews, "no impersonal 'march of science' story.

On this installment of ST, we're discussing a terrific new art exhibit at TU's Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, located at 124 East Brady in Tulsa's downtown Brady Arts District: "Painted Faces" will be on view through April 20th. This show explores the work of ten outstanding artists --- from Kansas City, Connecticut, Texas, the U.K., and elsewhere --- all of whom use the human head as a regular element in their picture-making.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with H. Alan Day, who's the younger brother of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, and who co-wrote with her the bestselling "Lazy B" memoir of a dozen years ago. Alan Day has a new book out called "The Horse Lover," which he tells us about on today's program. This moving and perceptive autobiography mainly describes how he was able to establish a sanctuary for unadoptable wild horses previously warehoused by the Bureau of Land Management.

On this edition of our show, we are talking about Latin America's two largest economies, those of Mexico and Brazil. Each has experienced much of the turbulence or strife that goes hand in hand, it seems, with globalization --- but each has also enjoyed many of the benefits of this ongoing, open-ended worldwide phenomenon. Our guest today on ST is an expert on such; Dr. Diana Negroponte is a nonresident senior fellow with the Latin America Initiative under the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution.

We speak by phone today with Blake Bailey, who grew up in Oklahoma City, now teaches creative writing in Virginia, and is the author of three highly regarded literary biographies (of Richard Yates, John Cheever, and Charles Jackson).