The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Napolitano: New TSA Screening Procedure For Fliers Under 12

Janet Napolitano, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, testifies at a hearing on Capitol Hill.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Parents of young children, we have some good news courtesy of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano: In the coming months, most children younger than 12 will no longer be required to take off their shoes when going through airport security.

The AP reported that during testimony before the Senate, Napolitano also said children will less frequently be subject to pat-downs from Transportation Security Administration officials.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:26 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

The Churn Behind The Stable Rate For The Uninsured

At first glance, today's report from the U.S. Census Bureau on the number of Americans without health insurance in 2010 looks, well, a little dull. About 16.3 percent of people in the country were without health insurance, which "was not statistically different from the rate in 2009," the report points out.

But dig a little deeper and there's plenty of action.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Painting Of A Burning Bank Fetches $25,000 At Auction

Chase Burning, an oil on canvas painting by Alex Schaefer.
Alex Schaefer via Ebay

One California artist has made some serious money with a series of paintings that have struck a chord internationally. In an auction on Ebay, Alex Schaefer sold a 22-by-28 inch oil painting of a burning Chase Bank branch in Los Angeles for $25,200.

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The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Ron Paul: It's Not Government's Job To Take Care Of Uninsured

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul speaks during the presidential debate sponsored by CNN and The Tea Party Express at the Florida State fairgrounds on September 12, 2011 in Tampa, Florida.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 2:53 pm

One question at last night's Republican presidential debate has the Internet abuzz. Not really for what Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) said but for the reaction of a few people in the Tea Party crowd.

This was the question from CNN's Wolf Blitzer:

"A healthy 30-year-old young man has a good job, makes a good living, but decides, you know what? I'm not going to spend $200 or $300 a month for health insurance because I'm healthy, I don't need it. But something terrible happens, all of a sudden he needs it.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Al-Qaida Is Weakened, But Remains A 'Serious Threat,' Petraeus Says

CIA Director David Petraeus (right) and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying earlier today (Sept. 13, 2011).
Mark Wilson Getty Images

"The CIA assesses that, 10 years after the 9/11 attacks, the United States continues to face a serious threat from al-Qaida and its worldwide network of affiliates and sympathizers," even though the terrorist organization "has been weakened," CIA Director David Petraeus told Congress today in his first testimony since taking over the top job at the intelligence agency.

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Europe
11:44 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Clerical Abuse Victims Seek Justice At World Court

Members of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests pose in front of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday. A group representing the victims is asking the world court to investigate top Vatican officials over the clerical sex abuse scandal.
Rob Keeris AP

The international tribunals at The Hague have dealt with horrific war crimes and brought Balkan war criminals and African warlords to trial.

Now, the tribunal is being asked to investigate top Vatican officials over the global clerical sex abuse scandal, and victims say these offenses meet the legal definition of crimes against humanity.

Pope Benedict XVI has repeatedly apologized for crimes committed by priests.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:33 am
Tue September 13, 2011

USDA To Ban 6 More Strains Of E. Coli In Ground Beef

Ground beef will have to undergo more E. coli testing before sale under new USDA rule.
iStockphoto.com

E. coli 0157:H7 isn't a lonely foodborne villain any more.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said today that six uncommon strains of E. coli will be banned from ground beef due to risks of illness. Consumer groups are hailing the move as the biggest advance in meat safety in years.

But meat processors warn it will cost consumers more money, and say the scientific evidence doesn't justify the new expense.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:55 am
Tue September 13, 2011

One Price Of Fatherhood: Low Testosterone

You can almost see the testosterone slipping away.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 4:30 pm

It turns out daddies are losing more than just sleep after a child arrives. New fathers also experience a sharp decline in levels of the male sex hormone testosterone.

At least that's what scientists have concluded from a long-term study of more than 600 men in the Philippines.

The scientists found that single men who started out with relatively high testosterone levels were more likely than other men to become fathers. But once a baby arrived, testosterone levels plummeted.

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Health
10:52 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Doctors Counter Vaccine Fears In Pacific Northwest

Many parents today expect to have choices — and that includes picking and choosing which vaccines their children gets.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 5:48 pm

Parts of the U.S. are seeing a drop-off in vaccination rates among young children. The falling rates don't necessarily track with poverty or other poor public health trends; in fact, a recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report flagged the poorest rates of kindergarten vaccination in relatively prosperous states, like Washington and Oregon.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Report: Marshals Service Needs To Improve Its Handling Of Felons' Assets

Federal watchdogs say the U.S. Marshals Service needs to do a better job of valuing and selling assets tied to fraudsters and organized crime figures.

The Justice Department's inspector general has found poor oversight and problems with record keeping that could be costing taxpayers money.

The Marshals Service has managed investments, homes and jewelry tied to many prominent criminals over the past five years. The prominent felons include Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff and organized crime figure James Galante.

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