Top Stories

Oklahoma House/KWGS News

House Speaker Announces Delay in State Budget Cuts

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma's House Speaker says the state has funds available that could protect health care services impacted by the state's $215 million budget cut. Three health care agencies will be most affected by the loss of an unconstitutional cigarette fee. They began reducing monthly spending this month to account for the money lost. Speaker of the House Charles McCall said Thursday that the funds would delay cuts until 2018 "or until a strategic budget solution is reached." The...

Read More
Pixabay

Oklahoma Not Prepared for Next National Recession

Whether it’s moderate or severe, a financial stress test finds Oklahoma is not prepared for the next national recession. Moody’s Analytics’ study says states need at least 10 percent of their budgets in reserve funds to weather a moderate recession, and 16 for a severe one on par with the Great Recession. Oklahoma has about 4 percent saved, making it the third-worst prepared state for an economic downturn, behind North Dakota and Louisiana. "There is one major reason for that, and that is...

Read More

Close Encounters With Congress?

A congressional candidate in Florida drew a little ridicule this week.

Bettina Rodriguez Aguilera, who is one of three Republicans and eight Democrats running in Florida's 27th congressional district, has said that she was taken aboard a spaceship when she was seven years old.

She does not mean at Disney World.

"I went in," she says in a 2009 Spanish language interview that appeared on YouTube this week. "There were some round seats that were there, and...

Read More

When It Comes To Race And Sports, Who Owns An Athlete's Opinions?

The NFL's players are 70 percent black; its fans are 83 percent white and 64 percent male, according to online sports site The Real GM . And when it comes to the current controversy over the national anthem and players taking a knee, that statistic is playing a huge role. It leads to the idea, says Amira Rose Davis of Penn State University, "that 'you are good as entertainment, but once you have a voice, I don't want to hear you. You need to shut up and play.' " Some players, though, clearly...

Read More

Happy Birthday PRT!

On The Next All This Jazz: Autumn Rolls In

Join us for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 21st, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. We'll hear from Barbara Carroll, GoGo Penguin, Larry Coryell, Phil Woods, Chet Baker, Bill Charlap, and many others. And our third-hour theme, running from 11pm until midnight, will be The Arrival of Autumn . Thus we'll hear such stellar jazz standards as "Early Autumn" and "Autumn Leaves" and "Autumn in New York" (to name just a few) -- plus we will also, throughout the program,...

Read More

StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we chat with the New York-based author and journalist Jennifer Egan, whose newest novel, the much-praised "Manhattan Beach," is just out. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel. Realistically detailed, poetically charged, and utterly satisfying: apparently there's nothing Egan can't do." And further, per Dwight Garner in The New York Times: "Immensely satisfying....

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the remarkable life and work of Dr. John Sarno, who died earlier this year at 93. As was noted in his New York Times obituary, Dr. Sarno was "a doctor at New York University whose controversial books on the psychological origins of chronic pain sold over a million copies, even while he was largely ignored or maligned by many of his medical peers.... Revered by some as a saint and dismissed by others as a quack, Dr.

The 2017 Tulsa American Film Festival, or TAFF, showcasing indie features and shorts from across the United States -- with a focus on local, classic, student, Native American, and Okie-rooted films -- continues here in T-Town at several different venues. Tonight, the 13th, the TAFF will present the Oklahoma Premiere of a new documentary film about the life and work of Wilma Mankiller, who in 1985 was the first woman elected as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

On this edition of ST, we chat with Jimmy Webb, who grew up in rural Oklahoma before going out to Hollywood, while still a teen, to break into the songwriting biz...and who eventually created such classic pop tunes as "Wichita Lineman," "By The Time I Get To Phoenix," "Up, Up and Away," and "MacArthur Park." Webb will soon perform (on the 14th) with the Bartlesville Symphony, singing and playing his wonderful songs while also telling plenty of stories. He shares a few of those stories with us today -- many of which also appear in his recent memoir, "The Cake and the Rain."

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about the work of Kay WalkingStick, a widely celebrated American landscape artist who once referred to herself as "a New York painter and a Cherokee woman." Now 82, and equally (and impressively) adept in both abstract and representational styles, WalkingStick is the subject of a newly opened retrospective exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa.

More StudioTulsa

Hidden Sixties Halloween Special

Fri., Oct. 27 at 8:00 p.m. on Public Radio 89.5

A behind-the-scenes look at museums podcast

When U.S. troops were ambushed in Niger on Oct. 4, the widespread reaction was surprise. The U.S. has military forces in Niger? What are they doing there?

Yet in many ways, the Niger operation typifies U.S. military missions underway in roughly 20 African countries, mostly in the northern third of the continent. They tend to be small, they are carried out largely below the radar, and most are focused on a specific aim: rolling back Islamist extremism.

If there's one constant throughout Steve Bannon's career, it's his ability to reinvent himself. His resume includes time in the U.S. Navy plus jobs working with Goldman Sachs; Biosphere 2; a Florida maker of nasal sprays; and a Hong Kong company that employed real people to earn virtual gold in the online video game World Of Warcraft.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Urinary tract infections cause painful urination and are unfortunately widespread. Scientists estimate that somewhere between 40 percent to more than 50 percent of women will get a UTI in their lifetime, and one in four will get a repeat infection. Left untreated, they can lead to kidney problems.

The Thistle And Shamrock: New Fall Sounds

Oct 20, 2017

New music is always in season, but autumn brings with it a special skew in our tastes. So for this episode of The Thistle and Shamrock, host Fiona Ritchie has collected another hour's worth to offer you, including The Breath, Robin Bullock, Ruth Keggin, and James Ritchie.

Barry Blitt drew his first New Yorker cover back in 1992. Ever since, he has been skewering politicians of all stripes. In 2008, he drew Barack and Michelle Obama fist-bumping in the Oval Office, and in 2016, he drew Donald Trump in a tiara and a women's bathing suit.

"I have a sketchbook open and I'm just trying to make myself laugh," Blitt says.

His new book, simply titled Blitt, features some of the cartoonist's most memorable and merciless work.

Pages