Wireless Technology

Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen? On this edition of ST, we're talking about various AI-related matters with Amir Husain, an inventor and computer scientist whose new book is called "The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence." As was noted of this book by Prof.

Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a new book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of ST, we get an update on the Kravis Discovery Center at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Located in the museum’s lower level, the Center recently underwent an extensive renovation in order to create a more interactive, more tech-driven -- and thus more "21st century" -- experience. Our guest is Dr. Bob Pickering, a Professor of Anthropology here at TU as well as a Senior Curator at Gilcrease.

Since 2012, the national non-profit organization Girls Who Code has taught computing and computer-programming skills to thousands of girls all across America. Our guest is the CEO and founder of that organization, Reshma Saujani, who has a new book out.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Wilson, the bestselling sci-fi writer and Tulsa native (and TU alum) whose new novel, just out, is called "The Clockwork Dynasty." (Please note that Wilson will soon be reading from this book, and signing copies of it, at a Book Smart Tulsa event here in our community.) As was noted of this novel in The Los Angeles Review of Books: "Wilson is one of the foremost prophets of the near future.... In 'The Clockwork Dynasty,' the irrepressibly readable Wilson has retreated to pseudo-vampiric sentient robots.

On this edition of our show, an interesting if rather unsettling discussion with Edward D. Hess, who is a co-author of the newly released book, "Humility Is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age." As was noted of this volume in a detailed appreciation posted at the online San Francisco Review of Books: "What will be the percentage of jobs that technology will replace in the United States during the next two decades? Estimates vary but not that much. There seems to be a consensus: a range of 45 to 50% between now and 2037.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there ARE more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to our chat from last fall with David Burkus, a well-respected expert on business and management practices who's also a bestselling author, an in-demand speaker, and an associate professor of management at Oral Roberts University.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a fascinating show from January. At that time, we spoke with author Adam Tanner about his then-new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry. In his previous book...[Tanner] took a broad look at the enterprises that gather and sell computer-generated data on consumers.

We are joined on ST today by Dr. Roger Mailler, an Associate Professor of Computer Science with the Tandy School of Computer Science at the University of Tulsa. He's also the director of the Computational Neuroscience and Adaptive Systems (CNAS) lab here at TU, which focuses on various biological and artificial systems that adapt in order to solve problems. Dr. Mailer tells us about the Heartland Gaming Expo 2017, which he created, and which will happen this weekend (April 8th and 9th) at the Reynolds Center on the TU campus.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with author Adam Tanner, who is a writer in residence at Harvard University's Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Tanner joins us to discuss his new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Russian hacking attempts worldwide, of cyber-attacks on the DNC that were meant to affect the 2016 Presidential Election, and of related news stories. And we'll also discuss, in more detail, what might be seen as the hi-tech precursor to these stories -- that is, the Soviet Union's longtime efforts to create a kind of national internet...long before the internet itself actually existed.

Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there do seem to be more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, fundamentally changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Laleh Mehran, a Denver-based multi-disciplinary artist who moved to the United States from Iran when she was a child in the 1970s. Her art work explores cultures and locations, ideas and identities, patterns and shapes -- and it seems especially focused on issues of technology, geography, and media. Her striking pieces have been shown/installed over the years -- both individually and in group shows -- in Holland, Germany, Italy, Massachusetts, Oregon, Pittsburgh, and elsewhere.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back Tulsa City-County Library CEO Gary Shaffer. He joins us to describe in detail the TCCL's newly renovated Central Library, which will re-open to the public tomorrow morning (October 1st) with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. For the past two years or so, the Central Library branch -- which originally opened in 1965 near Fifth and Denver in downtown Tulsa -- has been getting a complete overhaul, both its exterior and interior.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Nathan Pritchett, executive director of Fab Lab Tulsa. This popular nonprofit, which opened in Tulsa (near 7th and Lewis) in 2011, offers, per its website, "community access to advanced manufacturing and digital fabrication tools for learning skills, developing inventions, creating businesses, and producing personalized products. Fab Lab Tulsa is one of over 700 MIT-chartered Fab Labs in more than 70 countries and the first in the southeastern region of the United States.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Scott Phillips, a Tulsa-based entrepreneur and innovator -- and avid "hacker" -- who was recognized as a "Champion of Change" in a 2013 ceremony at The White House.

We're probably all aware of the much-publicized "online predators" who go after children these days on the internet, preying on innocent kids by way of trickery and violence. But these crimes, while obviously sick and deplorable, are over-hyped. How did this pervasive over-hyping come to be, and why does it persist? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with P.W. Singer, who is a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation; the founder of NeoLuddite, a technology advisory firm; and the author of several award-winning books. Singer is widely considered a leading expert on trends and tactics in 21st-century warfare, and he'll be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight (Tuesday the 29th) on the TU campus. The talk is entitled "Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know," and it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) "Don't just do something," goes an old saying that's sometimes attributed to the Buddha, "sit there." On this installment of ST, we speak with the acclaimed travel writer and essayist Pico Iyer, whose newest book is called "The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere." It may seem odd to find one of contemporary literature's best travel writers composing a book-lenth essay about not traveling, but Iyer begs to differ.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

On this edition of ST, we speak with journalist and editor Rick Tetzeli, who's the executive editor of Fast Company -- and who's also the co-author, with Brent Schlender, of "Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader." This newly released biography is, as was noted by a book critic for Business Insider, "detailed and thorough....

"Don't just do something," goes an old saying that's sometimes attributed to the Buddha, "sit there." On this installment of ST, we speak with the widely acclaimed travel writer and essayist Pico Iyer, whose newest book is called "The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere." It may seem odd to find one of contemporary literature's best travel writers composing a book-lenth essay about not traveling, but Iyer begs to differ.

Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, our Facebook pages, our email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- or, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled in her new book, "The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World," which she discusses with us today.

Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

The Internet is changing life itself, and it's doing so rather quickly, and we all know this. But how is it changing...us? We speak with Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and the Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

Pages