US Military

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

On this installment of ST, on the eve of the Fourth of July, we replay an interview from last year with the Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Brian Katulis, a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia. Katulis -- who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, and who spoke with us while he was in town -- has served as a consultant to numerous U.S. government agencies, private corporations, and non-governmental organizations on projects in more than two dozen countries, including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Egypt, and Colombia.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the noted Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States. Her newly published second book, "Soldier Girls: The Battles of Three Women at Home and at War," takes a close look at three female veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Adam Makos: a longtime journalist and military historian who's also the editor of the military-themed magazine, Valor. Makos is likewise the co-author of the bestselling nonfiction account, "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II," which is just recently out in paperback.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann speaks with Michael M. Phillips, a staff reporter at the Washington, D.C., bureau of The Wall Street Journal. Phillips has reported on the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan since 2001, and he went to Iraq to cover a certain American battalion several times between 2003 and 2006. He writes often about the aftermath of these wars, including post-traumatic stress, suicide, and other issues facing veterans and their families.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Ann Wright, a retired U.S. Army Reserve Colonel and a twenty-nine-year veteran of the Army and Army Reserves. A well-known peace activist, Col. Wright obtained a master's as well as a law degree at the University of Arkansas; she also earned a master's in national security affairs from the U.S. Naval War College. In 1987, she joined the Foreign Service and served as U.S. Deputy Ambassador in Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan, and Mongolia.

On this edition of ST, we present a conversation with the equally vociferous, aggressive, and relentless Michael L.

Pages