The University of Tulsa

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about the Bob Dylan Archive, that widely-reported-on treasure trove of 6,000+ items documenting the entirety of the legendary singer-songwriter's still-active career. This archive was purchased earlier this year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa; it will be housed at TU's Helmerich Center for American Research (which is located within the Gilcrease Museum).

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome back to our program Dr. Gerard Clancy, TU's Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the Oxley College of Health Sciences. (Dr. Clancy has also been designated as the next President of the University.) He joins us to talk about a newly announced effort aimed at addressing mental illness and substance abuse in the Tulsa area.

On this edition of ST, our guest is the bestselling novelist and philanthropist Steve Berry, who's actually in Tulsa today at the outset of a book tour; Berry's new novel, "The 14th Colony," is just out. But Berry is also visiting our community, as he tells us, in connection with his "History Matters" foundation, which is dedicated to historic preservation. This foundation, co-run by Berry and his wife, has raised more than $800,000 over the years in the name of saving historic treasures.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a "Diplomacy Begins Here" summit happening today, Thursday the 31st, at the Gilcrease Museum. This event is presented by Tulsa Global Alliance and Global Ties Arkansas in partnership with The University of Tulsa, Global Ties U.S., and the U.S. Department of State. Our guest is Jennifer Clinton, president of Global Ties U.S., which was formerly known as the National Council for International Visitors.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a documentary film that will be screened tonight (Thursday the 11th) in Helmerich Hall on the TU campus. The screening is free to the public, and it will also feature a panel discussion; it begins at 7pm. The film is question is "Children of the Civil Rights," and our guest is Julia Clifford, who directed it. As noted of this film at the "Children of the Civil Rights" website: "No one knew a group of children in Oklahoma City were heroes; not even the children themselves.

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Whitney Forsyth, an Associate Professor at the University of Tulsa School of Art. Prof. Forsyth heads up the Ceramics program here at TU, and she's also the curator of a terrific art show on view at the Living Arts of Tulsa gallery called "Core Connections: The University of Tulsa Student and Alumni Ceramics Exhibition, 1999-2016." It's on display through January 28th. For this wide-ranging exhibit, she selected work by her current and former students, all of whom have taken ceramic classes at the University over the past 17 years. As Prof.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with acclaimed playwright Lee Blessing, who's best known for his 1988 Tony-nominated play, "A Walk in the Woods." Back in January, he workshopped his most recent play, "The Hourglass Project," here at the University of Tulsa. It's a comedy, with interesting ethical overtones, about several elderly couples who, though an experimental procedure, regain their youth.

In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Gerard Clancy back to our program. Earlier this year, Dr. Clancy was named Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of The University of Tulsa's soon-to-be-officially-opened College of Health Sciences; before joining TU, he was President of OU-Tulsa for eight years. A recognized expert on community health, psychiatry, health care policy, and the study of medicine, Dr. Clancy tells us about how this newly created college will operate.

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Pepper Henry, who began his tenure as the executive director of the Gilcrease Museum about four months ago. As was recently reported by KWGS, Pepper Henry has requested $75 million out of  a proposed Vision 2025 sales-tax renewal.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Miriam Belmaker, an assistant professor of anthropology here at the University of Tulsa as well as a paleoanthropologist who studies the remains of small rodent species to determine environmental effects on human dwelling places and communities -- and on humanity's ancient ancestors. In doing so, she studies how changes in the climate over the past two million years may have affected human development and evolution.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

On this installment of ST, we preview a new exhibition that will soon open at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary -- Paintings and Works on Paper" will be on view at Gilcrease from August 24th through November 30th. Mainly known for his "Dust Bowl" or "Erosion Series" of Depression-era paintings, Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994) was one of the more celebrated artists to come to prominence during the Regionalist movement in American art (which also saw the rise of such masters as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood).

Molière's "Tartuffe" --- or "The Impostor" --- is a classic French play that was first performed in 1664. Bitingly satirical and LOL funny, this play tells the story of a deplorable religious con-man who tries to obtain the title to his friend's estate by sending him to jail; the title character of this ever-popular comedy also tries to rob that friend blind, to seduce his wife and daughter, and so on. "Tartuffe" is a work that's often revived in updated versions or alternate settings, and such is the case with the production of "Tartuffe" that TU's Department of Theatre is now staging.

On this installment of ST, we offer a conversation with P.J. O'Rourke, the well-known conservative American satirist and journalist who's been writing articles and books about --- and just basically poking fun at --- politics, economics, culture, and current events for nearly forty years now. O'Rourke's bestselling books include "Give War a Chance," "Holidays in Hell," "Parliament of Whores," and "The CEO of the Sofa" --- and his newest book, "The Baby Boom," is due out later this year.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with Dr. Mark Thurber of Stanford University, who will give a lecture this evening (Monday the 28th) at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium on the University of Tulsa campus. His address is presented as part of the TU Collins College of Business Energy Lecture Series; Dr. Thurber will be discussing state-run oil companies, which actually control most of the world's oil production. A well-respected expert whose scholarship has focused on the role of state-owned firms in the most crucial energy markets around the globe, Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the interesting characteristics, colonies, mating practices, defense maneuvers, and kinship structures of prairie dogs --- yes, prairie dogs: those once-plentiful-but-now-dwindling rodents that exist in five different species throughout the grasslands of North America. Highly communicative and actually able to "speak" via several distinct and sophisticated (and quite discernable) calls, these burrowing mammals have long been studied --- much like, say, apes or whales --- for social/behavioral reasons.

Oil output in the U.S. is poised to surpass that of Saudi Arabia within the next decade, as has been widely noted, but what about the serious if not alarming environmental costs associated with this surge in production? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Brian Lutz of the Department of Biology and the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He'll soon deliver a free-to-the-public address on "Hydraulic Fracturing vs.

On this installment of our program, we are pleased to speak by phone with Michael Tilson Thomas, the renowned musician, conductor, and music director who has won ten Grammy Awards over the course of his still-thriving career (and who has appeared on scores of albums). Thomas has long served as music director of the San Francisco Symphony, a post in which he has flourished.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Andrew Roberts, a longtime historian and biographer whose many books include "The Storm of War," which was named among the "100 Most Notable Books of 2011" by The New York Times. Roberts will give a free-to-the-public lecture on "Why Hitler Lost" at the University of Tulsa's Lorton Performance Center on Monday the 12th (the day after Veterans Day) at 7pm. This address is presented by Office of the Provost at TU, and copies of "The Storm of War" will be on sale before and after the event. (Mr.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Nicholas Carnes, an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. He's a 2006 graduate of The University of Tulsa; in 2011, he received a doctorate in Politics and Social Policy at Princeton University. Last week, Dr. Carnes presented two lectures as part of TU's Distinguished Alumni Lectureship in Law and Politics. The talks he delivered were entitled "What's the Matter with Law School?

TU Only Oklahoma School On Best College List

Sep 12, 2012

U.S. News & World Report's 2013 edition of Best Colleges has named The University of Tulsa as the 83rd best national research university.

This marks the 10th consecutive year that TU has been listed in the top 100 national universities --- TU is the only Oklahoma university to be included in the top 100. The publication's 2013 rankings, released on Sept. 12th, also show TU at 48th among the nation’s private doctoral universities.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Jeremy Kuzmarov, the Jay P.

Last week, the GOP held its National Convention. This week, the Democratic Party will have its turn. And with the presidential campaign now in full gear, American politics --- and the two-party system at the heart of those politics --- is now, more or less, on just about everyone's mind.

On this edition of ST, we speak with James Pace, an Oklahoma-born, Texas-based artist who has an exhibit on view at the University of Tulsa's Alexandre Hogue Gallery through September 20th. The show is called "Emblems from the Margin" --- and it includes mixed-media pieces as well as prints depicting various icons and recurring images. A professor of Visual Art at the University of Texas at Tyler since 1985, Pace is an artist who seems to emphasize symbolism, tactility, the American wilderness, and the narrative process itself in his work.

Our guest on today's edition of StudioTulsa is Tamara Piety of The University of Tulsa College of Law, where she is an Associate Dean of Faculty Development, a Professor of Law, and a Faculty Sponsor for the Women's Law Caucus. Her new book, just out from the University of Michigan Press, is "Brandishing the First Amendment: Commercial Expression in America." It's a scholarly work that explores legal, political, and philosophical themes --- and its subject matter couldn't be more timely.

On this encore edition of StudioTulsa, we visit with John M. Henshaw, the Harry H. Rogers Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair of the Department of Engineering here at the University of Tulsa. Professor Henshaw's new book is "A Tour of the Senses: How Your Brain Interprets the World." This book offers an engaging and accessible consideration of the five senses --- taste, smell, touch, sight, and hearing --- and, moreover, of how these senses influence and affect one another.

Earlier this month, in the pages of The New York Times Book Review, the acclaimed American historian Douglas Brinkley and the accomplished Hollywood actor Johnny Depp offered a co-written essay that made at least two rather surprising announcements.

Tulsa's Kendall Whittier neighborhood, certainly the city's most diverse neighborhood, is poised for new development.