The University of Tulsa

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Pepper Henry, who began his tenure as the executive director of the Gilcrease Museum about four months ago. As was recently reported by KWGS, Pepper Henry has requested $75 million out of  a proposed Vision 2025 sales-tax renewal.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Miriam Belmaker, an assistant professor of anthropology here at the University of Tulsa as well as a paleoanthropologist who studies the remains of small rodent species to determine environmental effects on human dwelling places and communities -- and on humanity's ancient ancestors. In doing so, she studies how changes in the climate over the past two million years may have affected human development and evolution.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

In late October, Dr. Gerard P. “Gerry” Clancy was selected as vice president for health affairs and dean of The University of Tulsa's new College of Health Sciences. Dr. Clancy is our guest on this edition of ST. He has served as president of OU-Tulsa for the past eight years, and his tenure here at TU will begin on January 1st, when the newly created College of Health Sciences officially begins operations.

On this installment of ST, we preview a new exhibition that will soon open at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary -- Paintings and Works on Paper" will be on view at Gilcrease from August 24th through November 30th. Mainly known for his "Dust Bowl" or "Erosion Series" of Depression-era paintings, Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994) was one of the more celebrated artists to come to prominence during the Regionalist movement in American art (which also saw the rise of such masters as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood).

Molière's "Tartuffe" --- or "The Impostor" --- is a classic French play that was first performed in 1664. Bitingly satirical and LOL funny, this play tells the story of a deplorable religious con-man who tries to obtain the title to his friend's estate by sending him to jail; the title character of this ever-popular comedy also tries to rob that friend blind, to seduce his wife and daughter, and so on. "Tartuffe" is a work that's often revived in updated versions or alternate settings, and such is the case with the production of "Tartuffe" that TU's Department of Theatre is now staging.

On this installment of ST, we offer a conversation with P.J. O'Rourke, the well-known conservative American satirist and journalist who's been writing articles and books about --- and just basically poking fun at --- politics, economics, culture, and current events for nearly forty years now. O'Rourke's bestselling books include "Give War a Chance," "Holidays in Hell," "Parliament of Whores," and "The CEO of the Sofa" --- and his newest book, "The Baby Boom," is due out later this year.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with Dr. Mark Thurber of Stanford University, who will give a lecture this evening (Monday the 28th) at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium on the University of Tulsa campus. His address is presented as part of the TU Collins College of Business Energy Lecture Series; Dr. Thurber will be discussing state-run oil companies, which actually control most of the world's oil production. A well-respected expert whose scholarship has focused on the role of state-owned firms in the most crucial energy markets around the globe, Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the interesting characteristics, colonies, mating practices, defense maneuvers, and kinship structures of prairie dogs --- yes, prairie dogs: those once-plentiful-but-now-dwindling rodents that exist in five different species throughout the grasslands of North America. Highly communicative and actually able to "speak" via several distinct and sophisticated (and quite discernable) calls, these burrowing mammals have long been studied --- much like, say, apes or whales --- for social/behavioral reasons.

Oil output in the U.S. is poised to surpass that of Saudi Arabia within the next decade, as has been widely noted, but what about the serious if not alarming environmental costs associated with this surge in production? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Brian Lutz of the Department of Biology and the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He'll soon deliver a free-to-the-public address on "Hydraulic Fracturing vs.

Pages