Tulsa jail

KWGS News Photo

Tulsa County applies for a grant to help reduce the jail population by developing more community based alternatives. Sheriff’s Governmental Affairs Director Terry Simonson says the MacArthur Foundation will choose 20 semifinalists to come up with a plan.

Applications are due the end of this month. In December, 10 finalists will be chosen to receive at least two million dollars a year for two years to implement the plan.

KWGS File Photo

One-on-one negotiations between County Commissioner Ron Peters and Tulsa City Manager Jim Twombly appear to have finally overcome arguments on a jail deal. Peters says there is agreement on all issues that had been holding up a contract for months.

Peters expects involved parties will review the terms and, barring any last minute snags, he believes an agreement on a contract will be reached this week, probably by Wednesday.

Tulsa Jail

Tulsa County leaders okay a new, higher rate for municipal inmates in the jail. Ron Peters led negotiations for the county in recent contentious talks over what the city of Tulsa should pay for inmates. He says the new resolution changes rates because the U-S Marshal’s Service now pays more, $69 a day per inmate, and negotiators agreed to pay whatever the Marshal’s Service pays. City leaders haven’t signed off on the jail deal, still disputing several aspects of the contract. County Commission Chair John Smaligo voted against the $69 rate, but not because he agrees with the city of Tulsa.

KWGS News

Sheriff’s officers want Tulsa elected leaders to take a tour and see for themselves what court guard and court services do. Undersheriff Tim Albin believes city leaders are laboring under a misunderstanding of what the guards actually do. He says their jobs are just an extension of the jail services.

Tulsa Jail

Negotiations continue on a jail contract between the County and the city of Tulsa, but neither side is budging much from earlier positions. With the current contract now expired, Sheriff Stanley Glanz says bills are being compiled for Tulsa’s municipal inmates, and they’re adding up fast.

Tulsa Jail

Tulsa County leaders establish daily jail costs and booking fees, and argue over what the city will pay for a one month extension of the jail contract. The current agreement between the city of Tulsa and County’s been extended through October, but Commissioner John Smaligo isn’t happy with what the city will pay for housing inmates during the extra month. He says the city’s offer of $50-thousand for the one month is unrealistic, and should be based on the rates set by the county. Other commissioners agreed to the city offer for the month extension.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the Lobeck Taylor Family Advocacy Clinic at the TU College of Law, which is, per its web page, "an intensive, one-semester course that offers students the unique opportunity to gain hands-on lawyering experience and explore the ethical, strategic, and theoretical dimensions of legal practice.

Tulsa Jail

Prison overcrowding is, unfortunately, a well-known nationwide phenomenon. It's also a familiar and quite serious problem here in our own backyard, as it were, and thus many local residents feel that if we don't step up and take action, it's only going to worsen --- that is, it'll go from very bad to even worse. On Tuesday, April 1st, Tulsa County voters will be asked to consider two sales-tax initiatives.

A Conversation with Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz

Jan 15, 2014
File photo

There's been a lot of talk lately about Tulsa County's seriously over-crowded jail and its woefully under-funded juvenile justice system. Thus certain Tulsa County officials are currently holding --- that is, this week and next --- a series of public meetings all over the county in order to a.) explain these separate yet related problems, and b.) make the case for a .067-cent tax, which the officials say will fix these issues. Our guest on ST is Stanley Glanz, who's served as the Sheriff of Tulsa County since 1989.

Tulsa County

The Tulsa Sheriff goes to court to try and force the state to take those inmates ready for Department of Corrections custody. Stanley Glanz is seeking an injunction against DOC Director Justin Jones.

The affidavit filed in Tulsa District Court by Glanz states of the current jail population of more than 18-hundred…129 are DOC-ready inmates “that the DOC refuses to schedule and receive into custody.” Glanz says that’s a big reason why the jail population has exceeded capacity for more than four months.
 

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