TU Communication

"The Big Trail" -- a classic Western from 1930, and the first film in which John Wayne had a starring role -- was chosen in 2006 by the Library of Congress to be a part of the National Film Registry. And it was shot in a wide-screen format (rare for that time) by the legendary Hollywood director, Raoul Walsh. Just recently, it was announced that someone has donated to Gilcrease Museum a set of rare stereoscopic photographs that were taken on the set of this motion picture, which was actually filmed all over the West, from New Mexico to Utah to California.

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

On today's program, we offer a linguistic/semantic discussion of technology and culture --- what these two terms mean, what they've meant, what they mean in America as opposed to Europe, and where the ideas behind these terms overlap.

On today's StudioTulsa, we look back on the award-winning career of TV journalist Bob Brown, who earned a BS at the University of Tulsa in 1968. Brown held radio and television positions in Tulsa, Houston, and Dallas before joining ABC News in New York in 1977. In 1980, he was assigned to the staff of a then-new program called 20/20, where he would remain for the next thirty years. At his retirement in 2009, Brown had been honored with six Emmy awards, the Investigative Reporters Award, and the prestigious Alfred I.