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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

EPA Takes First Step In Limiting Aircraft Emissions

The EPA has taken a step toward regulating greenhouse gases created by aviation.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 5:25 pm

The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday started what could be a lengthy process: making rules to limit the amount of climate-warming pollution that comes from aircraft engines.

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Saturn's Dark And Mysterious Outer Ring Is Even Bigger Than Expected

An artist's conception of how Saturn's immense Phoebe ring might appear to eyes sensitive to infrared wavelengths.
NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 7:19 pm

Saturn is famous for its lovely rings, but this gas giant has another ring that people normally don't see — and some new observations with an infrared telescope show that this mysterious ring is even bigger than scientists thought.

The first hint that Saturn had this secret ring came back in 1671, when the Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini looked through a telescope and discovered the moon now known as Iapetus.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

'His Emotions Got The Best Of Him' At Pool, Officer's Attorney Says

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 6:44 pm

An attorney representing former McKinney, Texas, police Cpl. Eric Casebolt says the officer was not targeting minorities and was in an emotional state even before he responded to a call about a disturbance at a pool party.

"His first call was a suicide at an apartment complex," said attorney Jane Bishkin, who is representing Casebolt on behalf of the Fraternal Order of Police. Casebolt resigned Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Nobel Laureate In Hot Water For 'Trouble With Girls' In Labs

Biochemist Tim Hunt, a 2001 Nobel laureate, has apologized – to an extent – for saying that women are a disruptive presence in scientific labs. He's seen here in 2012.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 3:29 pm

In 2001, Tim Hunt won a share of a Nobel Prize. In 2006, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. But in 2015, he's being widely criticized for his recent remarks about women in science, including: "when you criticize them, they cry."

Hunt, a biochemist, made that and other comments during a speech this week at the World Conference of Science Journalists that's being held in South Korea this week. He was quoted in a tweet that's since been shared hundreds of times, asking the audience to "let me tell you about my trouble with girls."

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

After Nearly 30 Years, Librarian Of Congress Is Calling It Quits

The Librarian of Congress, James Billington, speaks at an event last year at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 10:30 am

The head of the world's largest library has reached the end of the story.

James Billington, who has been the librarian of Congress since the Reagan administration, says he is retiring. The Library of Congress says Billington, 86, will step down on Jan. 1, 2016.

In a statement, Billington says, "Leading this great institution ... for nearly three decades has been the honor and joy of my 42 years of public service in Washington." The statement adds:

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The Two-Way
12:22 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Cleveland Officials: Police Are Being Retrained On Interacting With The Public

"This is a defining moment for Cleveland," Mayor Frank Jackson says of reform efforts. He's seen here at a news conference last month.
Tony Dejak AP

More than seven months after a Justice Department report on the Cleveland Police Department cited a "pattern of unconstitutional policing and excessive force," city officials say officers are getting new training on both interacting with youths and the use of force.

The federal report was spurred by a string of claims that Cleveland's police used excessive force. It came out last December — one month after police shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice at a public park. Rice had been playing with a pellet gun.

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The Two-Way
11:28 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Israel-Linked Spy Virus Discovered At Hotels Used For Iran Nuclear Talks

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif (center) with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Lausanne, Switzerland, after talks over Iran's nuclear program wrapped up in April.
Brendan Smialowski AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 12:58 pm

Earlier this spring, the cybersecurity firm Kaspersky was testing an advanced antivirus software on one of its computers when it stumbled on something big: As the Moscow-based company puts it, it was "one of the most skilled, mysterious and powerful" spy viruses in the world.

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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Vatican Establishes Tribunal To Investigate Bishops In Abuse Cases

Pope Francis approved a plan Wednesday to set up a tribunal to review charges of negligence against bishops who are accused of covering up cases of sexual abuse by priests.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 10:50 am

Taking a new step toward holding bishops accountable for not protecting children who were sexually abused by priests, Pope Francis has set up a tribunal that will hear cases against senior clergy. But a victims' group says the Vatican isn't going far enough.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Amtrak Engineer Not On Cellphone Before Philadelphia Derailment, NTSB Says

Emergency personnel work at the scene the day after a deadly train derailment on May 12 in Philadelphia.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 9:43 am

The engineer at the controls of the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia last month was not using his cellphone during the time he was operating train No. 188.

The National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday released a long-awaited analysis of cellphone records to determine whether the engineer was distracted at the time of the May 12 accident. Eight people died and some 200 others were injured in the derailment.

The NTSB states:

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Amid Corruption Scandal, FIFA Delays Bidding On 2026 World Cup

FIFA Secretary-General Jérôme Valcke (right) and FIFA President Joseph "Sepp" Blatter attend a news conference in 2014.
Victor Caivano AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 11:43 am

Still reeling from a corruption scandal that has ensnared some of its top officials and led to the resignation of its president, FIFA said it was delaying the bidding process on the 2026 World Cup.

"Due to the situation, I think it's nonsense to start any bidding process for the time being," Jérôme Valcke, FIFA's secretary general, said during a news conference on Wednesday.

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