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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Times' Reporter Must Testify About Source, Court Decides

The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it would refuse to hear an appeal from New York Times reporter James Risen, in a case about protecting anonymous sources.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:49 pm

A New York Times reporter may have to testify about an anonymous source. The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it would refuse to hear an appeal from James Risen, the reporter in the case.

The court in effect upheld a decision from the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals that Risen has to testify about the source for a chapter in his 2006 book, State of War.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Mon June 2, 2014

L.A. Kings Earn Shot At Stanley Cup With Win Over Chicago Blackhawks

Jarret Stoll (No. 28) of the Los Angeles Kings celebrates his team's game-winning goal in Game 7 of the Western Conference Finals. Kings defenseman Alec Martinez scored in overtime with a shot that deflected off the Chicago Blackhawks' Nick Leddy (left).
Tasos Katopodis Getty Images

The L.A. Kings beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 on Sunday, advancing to the Stanley Cup Final in a dramatic Game 7 overtime win.

The Blackhawks, the defending Stanley Cup champions, scored the first two goals of the game and led through the first period. The Kings tied the score at 3-3 partway through the second period, but Chicago took the lead again a few minutes before the second intermission.

The Kings caught back up at 7:17 of the third period. Missed shots and frantic saves carried the game into overtime.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Chemical Weapons Law Doesn't Apply To Jilted Lover, Supreme Court Rules

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that an international treaty wasn't meant to be invoked in an assault case in Pennsylvania.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Federal laws that were meant to prevent the international use of chemical weapons can't be applied to a woman who tried to poison her husband's mistress, the Supreme Court has ruled. Carol Anne Bond had smeared toxic chemicals in the hopes that the other woman would develop a rash.

The Supreme Court ruled that the federal law shouldn't have been used to prosecute Bond, as her actions were forbidden under state or local laws. The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts.

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The Two-Way
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Russia's Smokers Must Take It Outside, As Ban Begins

Women smoke in a Moscow bar in May. Tough new anti-smoking rules took effect Sunday in Russia, banning smoking in bars, restaurants and other public spaces.
Alexander Utkin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:17 pm

It's now illegal to light up in Russia's bars, restaurants and other public spaces, as a national smoking ban went into effect this month. Russian officials say the ban could save 200,000 lives a year in a country known for having many heavy smokers.

In 2009, the Russian Federation consumed 2,786 cigarettes per capita, according to the Tobacco Atlas, put out by the World Lung Foundation.

From Moscow, NPR's Corey Flintoff reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Mon June 2, 2014

EPA Unveils New Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

The EPA is proposing rules that would govern carbon dioxide gas emissions by U.S. power plants. Here, coal is transported via conveyor belt to the coal-fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyo., in March.
Jim Urquhart Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:52 am

New federal regulations announced Monday aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030.

The draft proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has sparked opposition from industry groups who say the changes would be prohibitively expensive. But the proposal's backers say the rules are needed to cut carbon pollution that scientists say contributes to climate change.

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET: Proposed Rule Published

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Spain's King Juan Carlos Will Abdicate In Favor Of Son

Spain's King Juan Carlos signs a document in the Zarzuela Palace, planning his abdication, in this photo released by the Royal Palace. Juan Carlos will be replaced by his son, Crown Prince Felipe.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:54 am

This post was updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

The news comes as something of a surprise: King Juan Carlos of Spain is abdicating and will be succeeded by his 46-year-old son, Crown Prince Felipe.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy made the announcement at a hastily called news conference Monday, saying that Juan Carlos is "convinced that this is the best moment for a change in the leadership of state with complete normalcy," according to El Pais.

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The Two-Way
8:24 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Ann B. Davis, Alice On 'The Brady Bunch,' Dies At 88

Ann B. Davis arrives at the 5th Annual TV Land Awards in Santa Monica, Calif., in 2007. Emmy-winning actress Davis, who played the housekeeper on The Brady Bunch, died at a San Antonio hospital on Sunday.
Gus Ruelas AP

The Emmy-winning actress, famous for often keeping the rowdy household on The Brady Bunch under control as Alice the housekeeper, died Sunday in San Antonio. She was 88.

The Associated Press reports that an autopsy is planned for Monday, but that according to Bill Frey, a longtime friend of Davis, she suffered a fall at her home on Saturday and never recovered.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Report: NSA Collects Millions Of Photos For Facial Recognition Project

Because of the big news about the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, we missed another big story on Saturday that was published by The New York Times: Based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, the paper reports the U.S.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

A Sisyphean Task Begins As 'Forget' Requests Roll Into Google

Following a European court ruling, Google is taking requests to delete personal information. At one point on Friday, the search engine was getting more than 20 requests a minute.
Jens Meyer AP

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:07 pm

Google opened an online form this week allowing European users to request that information about their lives be deleted from the search engine.

In the first 24 hours, more than 12,000 people asked to be "forgotten."

The company was responding to a European Court of Justice ruling in May that said citizens have the right to request certain information be removed, if, for instance, the information is inaccurate or outdated.

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