Topics

The world of Public Radio Tulsa

Amazon To Hire 80,000 Holiday Workers

Oct 16, 2014

An increase in customer demand is spurring Amazon.com to create 80,000 seasonal positions at its network of distribution centers across the U.S.

That's a 14 percent increase over the number of temporary workers it hired last year at this time.

The Kansas City Royals, who had not seen the playoffs since 1985, have swept the Baltimore Orioles, winning the American League pennant and securing a spot in the World Series.

As The New York Times puts it, right now, the Royals can do no wrong. The team has yet to lose a playoff game, stringing together eight straight victories, a feat no other team has accomplished.

Today, they perfected that run by beating Baltimore 2-1.

A small, two-year college in Texas sent at least two Nigerian students rejection letters saying they were not "accepting international students from countries with confirmed Ebola cases."

The story came to light when Idris Ayodeji Bello, a Nigerian activist and entrepreneur, tweeted a copy of a letter apparently sent by Navarro College to one of his friends:

As tax revenues increased and spending cuts took effect, the 2014 budget deficit dropped to the lowest level in six years.

In a statement, the Treasury Department hailed the news by pointing out a few key figures:

-- "The deficit in FY 2014 fell to $483 billion, $197 billion less than the FY 2013 deficit and $165 billion less than forecast in President Obama's FY 2015 Budget."

Thai Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, who seized power in a coup nearly five months ago, is hinting that he may need to backtrack on an earlier promise to restore democracy by next year.

In June, little more than a month after the May 22 putsch that overthrew the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Prayuth said elections would be held by late 2015.

In remarks today, however, Thailand's former army chief said the date could be pushed back.

At least a dozen trekkers have been killed in unseasonable blizzards and an avalanche in the foothills of Nepal's Himalayan mountain range.

NPR's Julie McCarthy, reporting from New Delhi, says locals and international tourists are among the dead. Rescuers say those killed include four Canadians, two Poles, an Israeli, an Indian and a Nepali.

The Wall Street Journal says:

The New York Times is reporting that on several occasions, U.S. forces involved in Iraq after the 2003 invasion came across aging stockpiles of chemical weapons and that several service members were injured by their exposure to toxic agents.

The Times reports in an extensive article:

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

With the stroke of a press release, the National Book Award nominees have been whittled to half their original number. Mitchell Kaplan, a recipient of the National Book Foundation's Lifetime Achievement Award, took to NPR's Morning Edition to announce the five finalists for each category: fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people's literature.

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

Hong Kong's police department says it is investigating reports of excessive use of force against pro-democracy demonstrators today following some of the most intense clashes since the protests ramped up last month.

Pages