Texas

Our guest is the the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Lawrence Wright, who joins us to discuss his new book. "God Save Texas" is a collection of stereotype-busting essays exploring the history, culture, and politics of Lone Star State. As was noted of this book by Jennifer Szalai of The New York Times: "Vivid.... Omnivorous.... Affectionate and genial.... [Wright] captures the full range of Texas in all its shame and glory.... An illuminating primer for outsiders who may not live there but have a surfeit of opinions about those who do....

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in the bi-weekly Museum Confidential podcast series, which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This particular podcast explores the Rothko Chapel, established in 1971 in Houston, Texas. It's both a sacred space and a modern art mainstay. Dedicated to non-denominational prayer and private contemplation -- and also to international peace and fellowship -- the building routinely hosts lectures, concerts, interfaith gatherings, and similar events.

Our guest is Tom Clavin, the popular historian whose latest book, "Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West," is just out in paperback. As was noted of this book by the Houston Press: "Thorough, compelling, and entertaining.... Clavin sprinkles in fascinating tidbits about life and culture in the Old West.... In 'Dodge City,' Clavin vividly re-creates a time, a town, and an era that it seems incomprehensible occurred less than 150 years ago.

Lots of talk these days, as we all know, about "building that wall." But what about the borderwall that already exists between much of the U.S. and Mexico? And what about the cultures, events, art works, communities, and lives that are associated with this borderwall -- that is, with the various walls and fences running between these two countries? Our guest is Ronald Rael, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Architecture and Art Practice at the University of California, Berkeley.

On this installment of ST, we speak with an Austin-based writer whose well-regarded debut novel has recently appeared in paperback from Harper Perennial.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a novel called "The Unraveling of Mercy Louis," which has just recently appeared in paperback. Our guest is the author, Keija Parssinen, who grew up in Saudi Arabia and Texas before graduating from Princeton University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Parssinen is now an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa, and she tells us about the themes, experiences, and ideas that led to the creation of this (her second) novel.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the bawdy humor of Jackie Mason collides -- for better or worse -- with the common-sense politics of Will Rogers as we welcome the one and only Kinky Friedman back to our show. The legendary Texas-based singer/songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician, and former columnist for Texas Monthly was one of two independent candidates in the 2006 election for the office of Governor of Texas; Friedman placed fourth in the six-person race.

(Please note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today's we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

"Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger," the former President George W. Bush once remarked to an appreciative audience, "which, in Texas, is called 'walking.'" It's pretty clear to just about everyone that the State of Texas sees itself as a breed apart in many ways, and for many reasons; Texans, as a rule, seem to consider their home state an exceptional, singular, not-to-be-messed-with place.