Texas

On this installment of ST, we speak with an Austin-based writer whose well-regarded debut novel has recently appeared in paperback from Harper Perennial.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a novel called "The Unraveling of Mercy Louis," which has just recently appeared in paperback. Our guest is the author, Keija Parssinen, who grew up in Saudi Arabia and Texas before graduating from Princeton University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Parssinen is now an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa, and she tells us about the themes, experiences, and ideas that led to the creation of this (her second) novel.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the bawdy humor of Jackie Mason collides -- for better or worse -- with the common-sense politics of Will Rogers as we welcome the one and only Kinky Friedman back to our show. The legendary Texas-based singer/songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician, and former columnist for Texas Monthly was one of two independent candidates in the 2006 election for the office of Governor of Texas; Friedman placed fourth in the six-person race.

(Please note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today's we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

"Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger," the former President George W. Bush once remarked to an appreciative audience, "which, in Texas, is called 'walking.'" It's pretty clear to just about everyone that the State of Texas sees itself as a breed apart in many ways, and for many reasons; Texans, as a rule, seem to consider their home state an exceptional, singular, not-to-be-messed-with place.