Technology

StudioTulsa
4:22 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

StudioTulsa on Health: "Adventures in Bringing Back the Recently Dead"

Aired on Wednesday, August 27th.

Dr. David Casarett is a physician, researcher, and tenured associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He's a long-practicing and widely published palliative care expert -- and also the author of an entertaining and well-written new general-audience book, "Shocked: Adventures in Bringing Back the Recently Dead." As a critic for The New York Times has recently noted, this book is "a comprehensive review of the fascinating science of resuscitation.... A specialist in end-of-life care at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr.

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StudioTulsa
5:05 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

All in the Making -- Notes on Fab Lab Tulsa and Its 2014 Tulsa Mini Maker Faire

Aired on Tuesday, August 26th.

"Imagine. Design. Fabricate." Such is the tag line for the Hardesty Center for Fab Lab Tulsa. Fab Lab Tulsa, as it's commonly called, is -- per its website -- a nonprofit "entity that provides community access to advanced manufacturing and digital fabrication tools for learning skills, developing inventions, creating businesses, and producing personalized products. Fab Lab Tulsa is one of over 150 MIT-chartered Fab Labs in more than 40 countries and the first in the southeastern region of the United States.

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StudioTulsa
6:17 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

"The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection"

Aired on Monday, August 18th.

The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

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StudioTulsa
1:34 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Defending the Band (and the Orchestra): Meet Ray Hair, Pres. of the American Federation of Musicians

Aired on Monday, June 23rd.

Organized labor, generally speaking, has had a tough time of it in our country over the last several decades; from coast to coast, for many reasons, professional unions have been minimized, marginalized, disrespected, demonized, etc. But has this also been the case for today's professional musicians? Our guest is Raymond Hair, Jr., the President of the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada (or AFM). This labor union, founded in 1896, is the largest organization in the world representing the interests of professional musicians.

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StudioTulsa
5:15 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Remembering Danny Lewin: "The Genius Who Transformed the Internet" (Encore presentation.)

Aired on Monday, June 2nd.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) We speak by phone with Molly Knight Raskin, a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Psychology Today, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and elsewhere; her TV credits include two PBS documentaries. Raskin is also the author of "No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet," which The Daily Beast has hailed as "a fascinating biography, but...also a history of the Internet and those who took it from clunky dial-up service to the speed-of-light marvel.

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StudioTulsa
6:22 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

"No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet"

Aired on Wednesday, February 12th.

Today we speak by phone with Molly Knight Raskin, a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Psychology Today, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and elsewhere; her TV credits include two PBS documentaries. Raskin is also the author of a new book, "No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet," which The Daily Beast has hailed as "a fascinating biography, but...also a history of the Internet and those who took it from clunky dial-up service to the speed-of-light marvel.

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StudioTulsa
12:35 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

"How to Build a Hovercraft: Air Cannons, Magnet Motors, and 25 Other Amazing DIY Science Projects"

Aired on Tuesday, January 21st.

On today's ST, we offer a thoroughly gosh-wow-how-cool discussion with Stephen Voltz. Along with Fritz Grobe, Voltz is co-founder of the EepyBird Laboratory in Maine --- please see website here --- which is well-known for its experiments with ping pong balls, sticky notes, balloons, soda cans, Ivory soap, and so forth, with many of these experiments becoming viral videos at YouTube and other sites.

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StudioTulsa
1:22 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

Best of ST in 2013: "The Science That Is Rewriting the Boundaries Between Life and Death"

Aired on Friday, December 27th.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Dr. Sam Parnia, one of the world's leading experts on the scientific study of death and near-death experiences. Specifically, we discuss Dr.

StudioTulsa
1:04 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

"The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed" (Encore Presentation)

Aired on Monday, December 9th.

(Please note: This show first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, we chat by phone with Nate Anderson about his new book, "The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed." It's a work that carefully documents how the early, little-to-no-regulation days of the Web gave new opportunities and new avenues to con artists, cheats, liars, spies, snoops, spammers, pornographers, thieves, and other crooks --- and how this new manner of criminal activity basically invented a new kind of police work.

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StudioTulsa
4:46 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

"Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age" (Encore Presentation)

Aired on Friday, November 29th.

(Please note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a key player in the electrical revolution that transformed life itself at the dawn of the twentieth century. His inventions, patents, and theoretical work formed the basis of modern AC electricity, and significantly contributed to the development of radio and TV. Like his competitor Thomas Edison, Tesla was also one of America's first celebrity scientists --- yet he's not nearly as famous as Edison today. Why? Our guest is W.

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