In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

Our guest on ST is Lennard J. Davis, an author and scholar who is also Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts in the Departments of Disability Studies and English at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Professor David Schmidtz, who is a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar here at the University of Tulsa. Tonight -- Tuesday the 7th -- at 7pm, Prof. Schmidtz will deliver a free-to-the-public lecture in the Allen Chapman Student Union on the TU campus; a reception and book signing will follow this event. The talk is entitled "Society Is Not a Race" -- meaning, put simply, that society is not a competition.

Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, our Facebook pages, our email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- or, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled in her new book, "The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World," which she discusses with us today.

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.

From public transportation to park spaces, from educational opportunities to crime stats, from ethnic diversity to urban density, how does Tulsa measure up to other cities of its kind throughout the nation? In mid-January, the Tulsa City Council was presented with the annual Quality of Life Report for our city. This report -- per the City Council website, where you can read all of it -- is "an objective analysis of our community, compared to 20 peer cities.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right.

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) The Internet is, of course, bringing massive changes to our lives -- and bringing them rapidly -- but how often do we really consider what these changes mean, or how they will affect us? In the not-too-distant future, for example, no one will remember what life was actually like before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? What lessons can we draw from it?

This evening -- Monday the 1st, at 6:30pm -- Oklahomans for Equality and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center will host a presentation by Dr. Perry Halkitis in acknowledgement of World AIDS Day. Dr. Halkitis is Professor of Applied Psychology, Global Public Health, and Population Health and Medicine at New York University; his talk happens at the Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 621 East 4th Street. Dr.