Silent Film

What can American motion pictures tell us about the American South, and what can the South tell us about the movies? Our guest is Robert Jackson, an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with David Spear and Joseph Julian Gonzalez, two film/concert composers from Los Angeles who are both lecturing and teaching here at TU as J. Donald Feagin Visiting Artists. About a year ago, Spear and Gonzalez composed a new score of original themes for the 1928 silent film "Ramona" -- and in doing so, they also re-arranged the title song and adapted sacred and Spanish classical music for their newly created score.

On this edition of ST, we speak with A.O. Scott, chief film critic at The New York Times. Scott has a new book out; it's called "Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This stunning treatise on criticism from...Scott is a complete success, comprehensively demonstrating the value of his art.

On this Veterans Day edition of StudioTulsa, we're talking about a certain classic novel that came out of World War I, "The Four Horsemen of The Apocalypse" by the Spanish author Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and about a silent-film epic, from 1921, which had the same title, and which was based on this novel -- and which also introduced audiences around the globe to an unknown actor named Rudolph Valentino.