Science

"Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age"

Jul 3, 2013

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a key player in the electrical revolution that transformed life itself at the dawn of the twentieth century. His inventions, patents, and theoretical work formed the basis of modern AC electricity, and significantly contributed to the development of radio and TV. Like his competitor Thomas Edison, Tesla was also one of America's first celebrity scientists --- yet he's not nearly as famous as Edison today. Why? Our guest is W. Bernard Carlson, a professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia.

What happens to us when we die? Where does the line between life and death really or finally reside? These questions are as old as human consciousness itself. On this encore presentation of ST, we present an interesting discussion with Dr. Sam Parnia, the director of the well-known AWARE Study (as in, "AWAreness during REsuscitation") and one of the world's leading experts on the scientific study of death and near-death experiences. Dr.

Why are concussions in sports --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this edition of our program, an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research here in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. A week from tonight --- on Thursday the 6th, beginning at 6pm --- Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, Dr. John Henning Schumann, our guest host, speaks by phone with Jessica Wapner, a freelance science writer who's focused mainly on health care and medicine.

(Please note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

What should one say to a person who's thinking of taking his or her own life? What's the proper way to react to such news? How best should one respond? The Mental Health Association in Tulsa will present the 13th Annual Charles P. Seger Seminar this evening (Thursday the 23rd) at 6pm at the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center. The theme for this year's seminar, which is free to the public (with no registration required), is "Recovering from Suicide and Depression." Our guest on ST is Dr.

(Please note: This show originally aired earlier this year.) When we say that someone is a "tinkerer," we might be offering a word of praise...or a put-down. Today's edition of ST explores the positive definition of the term "tinkerer," as a creative inventor or innovator.

"Eight Cultural Conflicts That Make Us Who We Are"

May 14, 2013

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Hazel Rose Markus, who is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural psychology.

(Please note: This interview originally aired in January of this year.) Our guest on ST is Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, joins us by phone to talk about her fascinating new volume, which is a collection of essays on how we perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that first aired in May of last year. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Ricki Lewis, a geneticist, journalist, professor, and genetic counselor. She's also the author of one of the most widely used college textbooks about genetics --- "Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications" --- and her latest book, now out in paperback, is "The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It." Dr.

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