Science

Why are concussions in sports --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this edition of our program, an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research here in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. A week from tonight --- on Thursday the 6th, beginning at 6pm --- Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, Dr. John Henning Schumann, our guest host, speaks by phone with Jessica Wapner, a freelance science writer who's focused mainly on health care and medicine.

(Please note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

What should one say to a person who's thinking of taking his or her own life? What's the proper way to react to such news? How best should one respond? The Mental Health Association in Tulsa will present the 13th Annual Charles P. Seger Seminar this evening (Thursday the 23rd) at 6pm at the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center. The theme for this year's seminar, which is free to the public (with no registration required), is "Recovering from Suicide and Depression." Our guest on ST is Dr.

(Please note: This show originally aired earlier this year.) When we say that someone is a "tinkerer," we might be offering a word of praise...or a put-down. Today's edition of ST explores the positive definition of the term "tinkerer," as a creative inventor or innovator.

"Eight Cultural Conflicts That Make Us Who We Are"

May 14, 2013

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Hazel Rose Markus, who is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural psychology.

(Please note: This interview originally aired in January of this year.) Our guest on ST is Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, joins us by phone to talk about her fascinating new volume, which is a collection of essays on how we perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that first aired in May of last year. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Ricki Lewis, a geneticist, journalist, professor, and genetic counselor. She's also the author of one of the most widely used college textbooks about genetics --- "Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications" --- and her latest book, now out in paperback, is "The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It." Dr.

On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with Dr. Pamela Soltis, the curator of the Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Evolutionary Genetics at the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. She'll present the fourth annual Paul Buck Memorial Lecture on the TU campus tomorrow night (Wednesday the 17th) in Helmerich Hall. Her lecture --- entitled "Plant Conservation in the 21st Century" --- is free and open to the public, and it begins at 7pm. The scholarly work of Dr.

What does it mean when the recent financial meltdown is fully understood by only one American citizen (or two, at the most) out of every 100 randomly chosen individuals? What should we make of law-makers --- based in Washington, DC, or elsewhere --- who debate nuclear policy when they've never taken a class in physics? What happens when people everywhere become more and more reliant on technology even as they understand less and less of it?

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we chat with Dr. Neil E. Caporaso of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, which is a research program of the National Cancer Institute --- which is, in turn, one of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Caporaso will be the keynote speaker at "Celebrating the Art of Healing," a cancer-survivor symposium to be held here in Tulsa on Saturday the 13th. This event will happen in the Mary K. Chapman Health Plaza at St. John Medical Center, lasting from 8:15am to 2:30pm. Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST is the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this in turn tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition. A professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, a MacArthur "Genius" Fellow, and an author whose works include such popular books as "A Primate's Memoir" and "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," Dr.

Okay, so you could probably handle going through life without any more plastic water bottles. And you'd be fine with using your own bags at the grocery store --- as opposed to those thin, cheaply-made plastic ones that they have at the check-out. But what about finding an alternative to plastic prescription bottles? Can you? And what else --- besides plastic --- does one keep shampoo in? On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Beth Terry, who began writing a blog entitled "Fake Plastic Fish" in 2007.

What happens to us when we die? Where does the line between life and death really or finally reside? These questions are as old as human consciousness itself. On this edition of ST, we present a very interesting discussion with Dr. Sam Parnia, the director of the well-known AWARE Study (as in, "AWAreness during REsuscitation") and one of the world's leading experts on the scientific study of death and near-death experiences. Dr.

When we say that someone is a "tinkerer," we might be offering a word of praise...or a put-down. Today's edition of ST explores the positive definition of the "tinkerer," as a creative inventor or innovator.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Michael Deem, who is the John W. Cox Professor in Bioengineering as well as a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University. Later today (Thursday the 31st), Prof. Deem will deliver a Phi Beta Kappa Lecture in Tyrrell Hall here on the TU campus; his address is entitled "In Search of Fundamental Mathematical Laws of Biology." (You can read a detailed bio for Prof.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Russell Lawson, a professor of history at Bacone College in Muskogee. Prof. Lawson has written several books on exploration over the years, including "The Land Between the Rivers: Thomas Nuttall's Ascent of the Arkansas, 1819" and "Passaconaway's Realm: Captain John Evans and the Exploration of Mount Washington." Today's we're talking about his newest volume, "Frontier Naturalist: Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas" (University of New Mexico Press).

"Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes"

Jan 22, 2013

Our guest on ST is Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, joins us by phone to talk about her fascinating new volume, which is a collection of essays on how we perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Ray Vandiver, the recently named (and very first) executive director of Tulsa Children's Museum (TCM). This facility has existed for the past few years as a "museum without walls" in our community, delivering performances and hands-on experiences to thousands of schoolchildren.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are discussing the interesting characteristics, colonies, mating practices, defense maneuvers, and kinship structures of prairie dogs --- yes, prairie dogs: those once-plentiful-but-now-dwindling rodents that exist in five different species throughout the grasslands of North America. Highly communicative and actually able to "speak" via several distinct and sophisticated (and quite discernable) calls, these burrowing mammals have long been studied --- much like, say, apes or whales --- for social/behavioral reasons.

How many cigarettes are sold each year, worldwide? Believe it or not, six trillion. Our guest, who calls the cigarette "the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization," was the first-ever historian, several years ago, to testify in court against Big Tobacco. On this installment of ST, which first aired earlier this year, we speak with Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Stephen Marshak, Professor of Geology and Director of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. As a part of Earth Week, the University of Tulsa's Geosciences Department invited Dr. Marshak for two speaking engagements that occurred here on the TU campus yesterday (the 17th) at noon and 7:30pm. The latter was an address entitled "What's Happening Deep Beneath the Midcontinent?: Tectonics, Earthquakes, and the EarthScope Project in North America's Interior." Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Michael L. Wehmeyer, a Professor of Special Education and Director of the Center on Developmental Disabilities at Kansas University. He's published more than 25 books and 250 scholarly articles and book chapters on topics related to special education, understanding intellectual disability, eugenics, and self-determination --- and he is the co-author of a new book, "Good Blood, Bad Blood: Science, Nature, and the Myth of the Kallikaks." A former Tulsan and University of Tulsa graduate, Dr.

(Please note that this show first aired back in May.) What do we mean when we call someone an "amateur"? What are we saying? As it happens, there are many answers to this question. On this edition of ST, we speak with Jack Hitt, a contributing editor to The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and public radio’s This American Life.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Carter Phipps, the former executive editor of Enlighten-Next magazine, whose latest book is "Evolutionaries: Unlocking the Spiritual and Cultural Potential of Science's Greatest Idea." (Phipps will be reading from and signing copies of this book tonight, the 21st, at 6pm at the Barnes and Noble here in Tulsa at 41st and Yale.) Just about everyone knows the basics, so to speak, when it comes to evolution: the Darwinian theory, the debate vs. "Creationism," the idea of natural selection, etc.

On today's program, we listen back to a conversation from February of this year with Dr. Lenn Goodman, the Mellon Professor of Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. At that time, Dr. Goodman was preparing to give a talk here at TU entitled "Creation and Evolution." An award-winning scholar and prolific author, Dr. Goodman's philosophical interests have mainly been in metaphysics and ethics, with special attention to Islamic and Jewish philosophical thought and their creative interactions.

On this encore edition of ST, a discussion of the neurobiology of pleasure,  and of how pleasures can turn into addictions. We speak with David J. Linden, who is a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as well as the Chief Editor of the Journal of Neurophysiology.

How many cigarettes are sold each year, worldwide? Believe it or not, six trillion. Our guest, who calls the cigarette "the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization," was the first-ever historian, several years ago, to testify in court against Big Tobacco. On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University.

On this edition of our show, which originally aired back in February, we hear from the writer and linguistic scholar Michael Erard, who's written about language for Science, Seed, Wired, The Atlantic, The New York Times, New Scientist, and other publications.

Our guest is Dr. Ricki Lewis, a geneticist, journalist, professor, and genetic counselor. She's also the author of one of the most widely used college textbooks about genetics --- "Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications" (now in its tenth edition) --- and her latest book, just out from St. Martin's Press, is "The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It." Dr. Lewis will be a featured speaker later this week at the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society's Annual Conference, which has been happening here in Tulsa since Saturday the 26th.

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