Science

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about Narcan, a/k/a Naloxone, which is a well-known and widely used opioid antagonist --- meaning, it's a drug that works to quickly block the effects of heroin, morphine, and similar opiates/sedatives. Narcan is thus administered in many instances where a person is experiencing (or has just recently experienced) a drug overdose; in this way, Narcan, which was originally developed in the 1960s, is thought to have saved some 50,000 lives nationally.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

On this edition of ST, we speak with two faculty members here at the University of Tulsa who are among the authors of an important new research study which appeared last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation will present its 2014 National Symposium on Reconciliation in America on May 29th and 30th here in our city; the theme for this 5th annual symposium is "Education for Reconciliation." (You can learn more about this upcoming event here.) On today's installment of ST, we speak with the keynote speaker for that symposium, Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, who has been president of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. Dr.

Today we welcome Dr. Lewis H. Ziska to StudioTulsa. He's a research plant physiologist who works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Research Service, where he specializes in crop systems and global change. Dr. Ziska has devoted much of his career to researching how climate change and rising levels of carbon dioxide affect plants and aerobiology as well as the roles they play in agriculture and public health.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the TU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will mark its 25th anniversary with a symposium here on campus regarding the moral and ethical issues involved in human medical research. The event is entitled "Protecting Human Subjects from Harm: Traversing the Moral & Legal Boundaries of Biomedical Research" and is described in detail at this link. Our guest on ST is the scholar who'll give the keynote address at this event: Dr.

Each year, the University of Tulsa's Presidential Lecture Series hosts distinguished speakers on a range of fascinating topics; all lectures are free to the public. The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by The Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair and supported by the University's Office of the Provost. TU's next Presidential Lecturer will be Frank Wilczek, the well-known theoretical physicist and mathematician who's also a professor at MIT. Wilczek's talk begins at 7:30pm on Thursday the 27th; it happens in the Reynolds Center, at 3208 East 8th Street, and reservations are not required.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Craig Nelson --- who's written for Vanity Fair, Salon, Popular Science, and other periodicals, and who's the bestselling author of "Rocket Men" as well as a biography of Thomas Paine --- about his newest book, which is a meticulous and consistently engrossing cultural history of the Atomic Age. "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era" is, as was noted by Kirkus Reviews, "no impersonal 'march of science' story.

Today we listen back to fascinating discussion that first aired on ST in November. At that time, our guest was the author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," had just appeared in paperback.

On today's show, we listen back to a StudioTulsa on Health broadcast from October of last year. At that time, guest host John Henning Schumann spoke with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK. The focal point of this discussion was the then-new book that Dr.

On today's ST, we offer a thoroughly gosh-wow-how-cool discussion with Stephen Voltz. Along with Fritz Grobe, Voltz is co-founder of the EepyBird Laboratory in Maine --- please see website here --- which is well-known for its experiments with ping pong balls, sticky notes, balloons, soda cans, Ivory soap, and so forth, with many of these experiments becoming viral videos at YouTube and other sites.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with John Geiger, the bestselling author of "The Third Man Factor" and "Frozen in Time," among other books. A member of the editorial board of the Toronto Globe and Mail, Geiger is, moreover, a fellow of the Explorers Club and the chair of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Expeditions Committee.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our discussion with Katy Butler, an accomplished journalist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Best American Essays, and The Best Buddhist Writing.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, speaks with us about her latest book, which is a collection of essays on how we as human beings perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Dr. Sam Parnia, one of the world's leading experts on the scientific study of death and near-death experiences. Specifically, we discuss Dr.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we are listening back to an interesting interview with Paul Bogard, who teaches in the Writing Program at James Madison University. Bogard describes his book, "The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light," which The Boston Globe has called "lyrical [and] far-reaching....

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Giles Slade, a Canadian environmentalist and journalist whose books include " Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America" and "The Big Disconnect: The Story of Technology and Loneliness." Slade's newest book, just out from New Society Publishers, is "American Exodus: Climate Change and the Coming Flight for Survival." As we read of this book at the New Society website: "Some scientists predict the sea will rise 1.5 meters before 2100, but rapidly melting polar ice caps co

(Please note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a key player in the electrical revolution that transformed life itself at the dawn of the twentieth century. His inventions, patents, and theoretical work formed the basis of modern AC electricity, and significantly contributed to the development of radio and TV. Like his competitor Thomas Edison, Tesla was also one of America's first celebrity scientists --- yet he's not nearly as famous as Edison today. Why? Our guest is W.

Our guest is author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," was one of the most widely acclaimed works of nonfiction to be published last year. The book has just appeared in paperback; Solomon joins us today by phone.

Our guest on this edition of ST is a retired petroleum engineering executive and author, John Turley, who will deliver the free-to-the-public Norman M. Hulings, Jr., Memorial Lecture here on the TU campus tomorrow evening (Friday the 15th). Turley's lecture begins at 6pm in the Great Hall of the Allen Chapman Activity Center, which is at 440 S. Gary Avenue.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Henning Schumann conducts a fascinating interview with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK, where he's also the Director of Research at the Manchester Collaborative Center for Inflammation Research. Dr.

We speak today by phone with Katy Butler, an accomplished journalist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, The Best American Science Writing, The Best American Essays, and The Best Buddhist Writing.

Why are concussions in sports today --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this encore edition of our program, we listen back to an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. When we originally spoke with Dr.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion from April of this year. At that time, we spoke by phone with the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this, in turn, tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition.

On this encore edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Pamela Soltis, the curator of the Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Evolutionary Genetics at the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. The work of Dr. Soltis has focused on the use of molecular evidence to reconstruct the patterns of plant evolution, and she has contributed significantly to our understanding of the evolution of flowering plants.

On this edition of ST, as the week-long 2013 Alzheimer's Association International Conference comes to end up in Boston, we speak with Mark Fried, the president and CEO of the Oklahoma Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. Fried tells us about some interesting new studies and findings that were discussed at this year's conference, namely those related to: the risk and prevention of Alzheimer's disease; advances in early detection; and clinical trials and ongoing therapies.

"How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction"

Jul 11, 2013

"It's the end of the world as we know it," announces a nifty rock song by R.E.M. from 1987, "and I feel fine." Or as T.S. Eliot wrote in "The Hollow Men," a poem first published in 1925: "This is the way the world ends / This is the way the world ends / This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper." Ever wonder how it will all come to a close? What doomsday will look like?

"Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age"

Jul 3, 2013

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a key player in the electrical revolution that transformed life itself at the dawn of the twentieth century. His inventions, patents, and theoretical work formed the basis of modern AC electricity, and significantly contributed to the development of radio and TV. Like his competitor Thomas Edison, Tesla was also one of America's first celebrity scientists --- yet he's not nearly as famous as Edison today. Why? Our guest is W. Bernard Carlson, a professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia.

What happens to us when we die? Where does the line between life and death really or finally reside? These questions are as old as human consciousness itself. On this encore presentation of ST, we present an interesting discussion with Dr. Sam Parnia, the director of the well-known AWARE Study (as in, "AWAreness during REsuscitation") and one of the world's leading experts on the scientific study of death and near-death experiences. Dr.

Why are concussions in sports --- at the grade school, high school, collegiate, and professional levels; especially over the last decade or so --- becoming more and more common? And what exactly does the term "post-concussion syndrome" (or PCS) refer to? On this edition of our program, an interesting discussion with Dr. Pat Bellgowan, who's a neuroscientist at The Laureate Institute for Brain Research here in Tulsa as well as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at TU. A week from tonight --- on Thursday the 6th, beginning at 6pm --- Dr.

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