Science

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about Narcan, a/k/a Naloxone, which is a well-known and widely used opioid antagonist --- meaning, it's a drug that works to quickly block the effects of heroin, morphine, and similar opiates/sedatives. Narcan is thus administered in many instances where a person is experiencing (or has just recently experienced) a drug overdose; in this way, Narcan, which was originally developed in the 1960s, is thought to have saved some 50,000 lives nationally.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

On this edition of ST, we speak with two faculty members here at the University of Tulsa who are among the authors of an important new research study which appeared last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation will present its 2014 National Symposium on Reconciliation in America on May 29th and 30th here in our city; the theme for this 5th annual symposium is "Education for Reconciliation." (You can learn more about this upcoming event here.) On today's installment of ST, we speak with the keynote speaker for that symposium, Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, who has been president of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. Dr.

Today we welcome Dr. Lewis H. Ziska to StudioTulsa. He's a research plant physiologist who works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Research Service, where he specializes in crop systems and global change. Dr. Ziska has devoted much of his career to researching how climate change and rising levels of carbon dioxide affect plants and aerobiology as well as the roles they play in agriculture and public health.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the TU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will mark its 25th anniversary with a symposium here on campus regarding the moral and ethical issues involved in human medical research. The event is entitled "Protecting Human Subjects from Harm: Traversing the Moral & Legal Boundaries of Biomedical Research" and is described in detail at this link. Our guest on ST is the scholar who'll give the keynote address at this event: Dr.

Each year, the University of Tulsa's Presidential Lecture Series hosts distinguished speakers on a range of fascinating topics; all lectures are free to the public. The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by The Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair and supported by the University's Office of the Provost. TU's next Presidential Lecturer will be Frank Wilczek, the well-known theoretical physicist and mathematician who's also a professor at MIT. Wilczek's talk begins at 7:30pm on Thursday the 27th; it happens in the Reynolds Center, at 3208 East 8th Street, and reservations are not required.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Craig Nelson --- who's written for Vanity Fair, Salon, Popular Science, and other periodicals, and who's the bestselling author of "Rocket Men" as well as a biography of Thomas Paine --- about his newest book, which is a meticulous and consistently engrossing cultural history of the Atomic Age. "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era" is, as was noted by Kirkus Reviews, "no impersonal 'march of science' story.

Today we listen back to fascinating discussion that first aired on ST in November. At that time, our guest was the author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," had just appeared in paperback.

On today's show, we listen back to a StudioTulsa on Health broadcast from October of last year. At that time, guest host John Henning Schumann spoke with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK. The focal point of this discussion was the then-new book that Dr.

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