Science

On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

On this edition StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about a newly launched website -- both clear and striking in its design, both interactive and up-to-the-minute in its content -- called Future of You. It takes a decidedly people-focused and tech-savvy approach to health and medical issues, and it was launched back in March by the good folks at KQED (which is a public radio and TV affiliate in the San Francisco Bay Area).

Attention, all who appreciate a good TED Talk.... From noon till 4pm today, Friday the 24th, at the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus, the University of Tulsa will present its very first TEDx event. As noted at TU's detailed TEDx website: "In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection....

On this installment of ST, a fascinating discussion with the Tennessee-based storyteller and performer Jim Pfitzer, who will soon appear onstage in Tulsa in "A Standard of Change," the one-man play that he created about the life and work of Aldo Leopold (1887-1948). An influential American author, scientist, ecologist, forester, and conservationist, Leopold -- the "father of wildlife biology," as some have called him -- is probably best known as the author of "A Sand County Almanac," which is a literary classic that's especially popular with environmentalist readers.

On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday night of next week, at 8pm each evening, PBS television (seen here in Greater Tulsa on OETA) will air a three-part, six-hour documentary, "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies." It's directed by Barak Goodman and executive produced by Ken Burns, and Goodman is our guest on this edition of ST. As the PBS website notes of this documentary, which is based on the likewise-titled, Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Dr.

Why do some societies thrive while others fail? What makes certain societies more vengeful, more violent, or more war-driven than others? And what can we who live in the world's modern societies learn from those who dwell in -- or have dwelled in -- the world's traditional societies? Such are the questions we explore on this edition of StudioTulsa.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Miriam Belmaker, an assistant professor of anthropology here at the University of Tulsa as well as a paleoanthropologist who studies the remains of small rodent species to determine environmental effects on human dwelling places and communities -- and on humanity's ancient ancestors. In doing so, she studies how changes in the climate over the past two million years may have affected human development and evolution.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Cat Warren, a university professor and former journalist who for several years had an admittedly strange hobby -- that is, she and her German shepherd, Solo, would often go searching for the dead. Solo, now retired, was a cadaver dog -- and what began as an effort to make the best of Solo's unruly energy and boundless enthusiasm eventually became, for our guest today, a quest to learn all she could about so-called "working" dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, a discussion with Ziva Branstetter, the Enterprise Editor at the Tulsa World, where she's also the lead reporter for a three-part series of articles called "Quake Debate." The first of these articles appeared yesterday in that newspaper, and the second is in today's World.

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Anthony Barnosky, a Professor of Integrated Biology at UC-Berkeley and a leading scientist specializing on how global change affects biodiversity and ecosystem function.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with Dr. Walter Piper of the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Chapman University (in Orange, California). Dr. Piper is an expert on the common loon -- having studied these diver birds, known for their alluring and distinctive calls, for some 22 years -- and he'll present a free-to-the-public lecture on the social behavior of loons this afternoon (Friday the 14th) at 3pm in Oliphant Hall on the TU campus.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Karen M. Masterson, a journalist turned malaria researcher, whose new book is "The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure." It's a remarkable and sometimes unsettling story of science, medicine, and war -- at once illuminating and surprising, the book also explores the ethical perils of seeking treatments for disease while ignoring the human condition.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Robert Dudley, who's a Professor of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Prof. Dudley tells us about his interesting "drunken monkey hypothesis," which (per its Wikipedia entry) "proposes that human attraction to ethanol may have a genetic basis due to the high dependence of the primate ancestor of Homo sapiens on fruit as a food source.

On this installment of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Lauren Silverman, the Health, Science, and Technology reporter at KERA, which is the NPR member-station in Dallas. Silverman is one of the creators of a newly posted, impressively researched, and decidedly multi-media "digital storytelling project" at the KERA website that focuses on hip fractures among the elderly, in both the Greater Dallas region and the United States more generally.

(Please note: This show first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Craig Nelson --- who's written for Vanity Fair, Salon, Popular Science, and other periodicals, and who's the bestselling author of "Rocket Men" as well as a biography of Thomas Paine --- about his newest book, which is an engrossing cultural history of the Atomic Age. "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era" is, as was noted by Kirkus Reviews, "no impersonal 'march of science' story.

Our guest is James Peterson, the James Beard Award-winning food writer, cookbook author, photographer, and cooking teacher who started his career as a restaurant cook in Paris in the 1970s. He's written more than a dozen cooking guides and recipe books over the years, including "Sauces," "Fish & Shellfish," "Meat: A Kitchen Education," and "Cooking." His newest book, just out, is called "Done.: A Cook's Guide to Knowing When Food Is Perfectly Cooked," and Peterson joins us today to discuss this volume.

On this edition of ST on Health, we learn about Narcan, a/k/a Naloxone, which is a well-known and widely used opioid antagonist --- meaning, it's a drug that works to quickly block the effects of heroin, morphine, and similar opiates/sedatives. Narcan is thus administered in many instances where a person is experiencing (or has just recently experienced) a drug overdose; in this way, Narcan, which was originally developed in the 1960s, is thought to have saved some 50,000 lives nationally.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

On this edition of ST, we speak with two faculty members here at the University of Tulsa who are among the authors of an important new research study which appeared last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation will present its 2014 National Symposium on Reconciliation in America on May 29th and 30th here in our city; the theme for this 5th annual symposium is "Education for Reconciliation." (You can learn more about this upcoming event here.) On today's installment of ST, we speak with the keynote speaker for that symposium, Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, who has been president of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. Dr.

Today we welcome Dr. Lewis H. Ziska to StudioTulsa. He's a research plant physiologist who works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Research Service, where he specializes in crop systems and global change. Dr. Ziska has devoted much of his career to researching how climate change and rising levels of carbon dioxide affect plants and aerobiology as well as the roles they play in agriculture and public health.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the TU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will mark its 25th anniversary with a symposium here on campus regarding the moral and ethical issues involved in human medical research. The event is entitled "Protecting Human Subjects from Harm: Traversing the Moral & Legal Boundaries of Biomedical Research" and is described in detail at this link. Our guest on ST is the scholar who'll give the keynote address at this event: Dr.

Each year, the University of Tulsa's Presidential Lecture Series hosts distinguished speakers on a range of fascinating topics; all lectures are free to the public. The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by The Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair and supported by the University's Office of the Provost. TU's next Presidential Lecturer will be Frank Wilczek, the well-known theoretical physicist and mathematician who's also a professor at MIT. Wilczek's talk begins at 7:30pm on Thursday the 27th; it happens in the Reynolds Center, at 3208 East 8th Street, and reservations are not required.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Craig Nelson --- who's written for Vanity Fair, Salon, Popular Science, and other periodicals, and who's the bestselling author of "Rocket Men" as well as a biography of Thomas Paine --- about his newest book, which is a meticulous and consistently engrossing cultural history of the Atomic Age. "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era" is, as was noted by Kirkus Reviews, "no impersonal 'march of science' story.

Today we listen back to fascinating discussion that first aired on ST in November. At that time, our guest was the author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," had just appeared in paperback.

On today's show, we listen back to a StudioTulsa on Health broadcast from October of last year. At that time, guest host John Henning Schumann spoke with Daniel M. Davis, a Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester in the UK. The focal point of this discussion was the then-new book that Dr.

On today's ST, we offer a thoroughly gosh-wow-how-cool discussion with Stephen Voltz. Along with Fritz Grobe, Voltz is co-founder of the EepyBird Laboratory in Maine --- please see website here --- which is well-known for its experiments with ping pong balls, sticky notes, balloons, soda cans, Ivory soap, and so forth, with many of these experiments becoming viral videos at YouTube and other sites.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with John Geiger, the bestselling author of "The Third Man Factor" and "Frozen in Time," among other books. A member of the editorial board of the Toronto Globe and Mail, Geiger is, moreover, a fellow of the Explorers Club and the chair of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Expeditions Committee.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our discussion with Katy Butler, an accomplished journalist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Best American Essays, and The Best Buddhist Writing.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we revisit our chat with Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know." Horowitz, who teaches psychology, animal behavior, and canine cognition at Barnard College, Columbia University, speaks with us about her latest book, which is a collection of essays on how we as human beings perceive, discover, and experience the world around us.

Pages