Religion

The Supreme Court has by now affirmed, of course, that gay marriage is the law of the land, and LGBTQ lifestyles, television shows, cultures, and communities are becoming more and more present -- and thus more and more visible -- in American life. How is this sea-change affecting America's churches, especially here in the middle of the country? On this edition of ST, we speak with Rev. Cynthia Meyer, a United Methodist minister. Earlier this year, she came out -- while she was preaching a homily -- to her Edgerton, Kansas, congregation.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Lisa Miller, an author and psychologist who's latest book, a bestseller called "The Spiritual Child," is now out in paperback. Dr. Miller -- who wrote an article for Time.com last year based on this book entitled "Why Kids Who Believe in Something Are Happier and Healthier" -- is the Director of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, and she joins us by phone.

How have civil rights changed in this country -- and indeed, around the world -- since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001? How has our understanding of civil rights -- our common impression of it -- changed in this regard, as well as our politics? We explore such questions with our guest on ST today, Sahar F. Aziz, who is a professor at the Texas A&M University School of Law and a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. She'll deliver the 17th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture at the TU Law School on Thursday the 15th at 6pm.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we share an interesting chat with Krista Tippett that was taped last Saturday afternoon at a Book Smart Tulsa event at All Souls Unitarian Church. Tippett is, of course, the award-winning host of the public radio program On Being, which airs on KWGS Sundays at noon -- and which is widely acclaimed for its insightful and extended conversations regarding life's biggest questions. It's an always-engaging show whose guests include all sorts of experts, from theologians and scientists to poets and musicians.

On this segment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to chat with Elaine Pagels, a leading theological scholar in America who has taught at Princeton University since 1982. Pagels is also a bestselling author; her landmark book, "The Gnostic Gospels," analyzed more than 50 early Christian manuscripts that had been unearthed in Egypt in the 1940s -- and it won both the National Book Critics Circle Award and National Book Award.

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) How long has atheism been a part of human experience? Most people today regard the sustained, intellectually rigorous adherence to non-religion as an invention of the European Enlightenment -- or, more recently, of modernity. But as our guest argues on this edition of ST, atheism is actually -- like so many other aspects of Western life and culture -- a phenomenon with origins in the societies of the ancient Mediterranean.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June; we are pleased to present it once again on MLK Day.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his book, "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history.

On this edition of ST, we chat with The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II, who's the president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP. Rev.

How long has atheism been a part of human experience? Most people today regard the sustained, intellectually rigorous adherence to non-religion as an invention of the European Enlightenment -- or, more recently, of modernity. But as our guest argues on this edition of ST, atheism is actually -- like so many other aspects of Western life and culture -- a phenomenon with origins in the societies of the ancient Mediterranean.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his new book: "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town, and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history. In particular, Auchmutey depicts the life and times of one Greg Wittkamper, a student at the school who came from a nearby Christian commune that devoutly and publicly (and often quite dangerously) supported racial equality.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to a 1999 interview with Marcus Borg, a noted liberal theologian and New Testament scholar who was among the first -- from the 1980s onward -- to analyze Jesus as a historical figure. Borg, who died last week at age 72 of a lung ailment, appeared on StudioTulsa a few times over the years. This discussion marks his first appearance on our program.

On Sunday the 25th -- at Grace Lutheran Church (2331 East 5th Place) in Tulsa -- the 28th Annual Knippa Interfaith / Ecumenical Lecture will be given. It is free to the public, it starts at 7pm, and it will feature the Rev. Dr. John M. Buchanan, Pastor Emeritus of the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago (where he served for more than 25 years). Buchanan is also the editor and publisher of The Christian Century magazine; he has received numerous doctorates and honors for his scholarship, and he's written three books.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

(Note: This show first aired in June.) On this installment of ST, we speak with Rachel Urquhart, a writer whose work has been published in The New Yorker, Tin House, Elle, The New York Times, Vogue, and Spy, among other publications. Urquhart has recently published her first novel, "The Visionist," which is a widely acclaimed historical drama about a teenage girl who finds refuge --- or perhaps does not find refuge --- in an 1840s Shaker community.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) There's an old Lenny Bruce one-liner that goes like this: "Everyday, people are straying away from the church and going back to God." In this day and age, there must be some truth to that idea; while it's true that more and more people in this country are giving up on the religion they grew up with or else rejecting organized religion entirely, it's also true that many who have turned away from religious institutions --- as well as many others who've lived wholly without religion --- really do hunger for something more than what con

On this installment of ST, we speak with Rachel Urquhart, a writer whose work has been published in The New Yorker, Tin House, Elle, The New York Times, Vogue, and Spy, among other publications. Urquhart has recently published her first novel, "The Visionist," which is a widely acclaimed historical drama about a teenage girl who finds refuge --- or perhaps does not find refuge --- in an 1840s Shaker community.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a 2010 interview that we did with Krista Tippett, the Oklahoma-born and Peabody Award-winning host of American Public Media's "On Being," which is heard every Sunday at noon here on Public Radio 89.5. Tippett will be the inaugural speaker tonight (Monday the 7th) in the Harold E. Hill Lecture Series at the University of Tulsa, which begins at 7pm in the Great Hall of the Allen Chapman Activity Center.

There's an old Lenny Bruce one-liner that goes like this: "Everyday, people are straying away from the church and going back to God." In this day and age, there must be some truth to that idea; while it's true that more and more people in this country are giving up on the religion they grew up with or else rejecting organized religion entirely, it's also true that many who have turned away from religious institutions --- as well as many others who've lived wholly without religion --- really do hunger for something more than what contemporary secular life has to offer.

Once upon a time, talking about one's religion while at the office was strictly taboo. It was basically considered bad form, and it was against the rules in many American workplaces. Today, that's often not the case. When did this change occur? And why? Our guest is Dr. David Miller, who serves as Director of the Princeton University Faith and Work Initiative. As such, he both researches and lectures on business ethics as well as the intersection of faith and work (in the US and around the globe). Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with John Geiger, the bestselling author of "The Third Man Factor" and "Frozen in Time," among other books. A member of the editorial board of the Toronto Globe and Mail, Geiger is, moreover, a fellow of the Explorers Club and the chair of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Expeditions Committee.

On this edition of ST, we present a conversation with the equally vociferous, aggressive, and relentless Michael L.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Candida Moss, a professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.

On this edition of our program, we offer a fascinating discussion concerning art, religion, and history with Dr. Clare Haynes of the University of Edinburgh. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 7th, Dr. Haynes will give the 2013 Rita and William H. Bell Distinguished Lecture at 7:30pm in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus. It's free and open to the public, and it's presented by the TU Department of Philosophy and Religion. The title for this lecture is "Resisting Affinities: The Visual Arts and the Church of England Since the Reformation." As Dr.

What can we anticipate --- or even expect --- from the future of interfaith discussion in this country? To explore that question, we speak by phone with Dr. Charles Kimball, the Director and Presidential Professor of the Religious Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. A noted expert and prolific author and scholar concerning religion and religious history, Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Mustafa Akyolm, a columnist for two Turkish newspapers whose work has also appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, The Washington Post, The International Herald Tribune, and elsewhere. He's also spoken at the Council on Foreign Relations, the Brookings Institution, the Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, and the TED conference.

Our guest on ST is Elizabeth Patterson, the longtime director of the world-renowned choir known as Gloriae Dei Cantores ("Singers to the Glory of God"). This group is known and admired for its wide-ranging choral artistry, which takes in the repertoire of sacred choral music, Gregorian chant, 21st-century compositions, and more. The choir has received critical acclaim for its artistic elegance, performance authenticity, and compelling spirituality; it's made dozens of recordings over the years and has toured extensively across the globe.

Last week, the GOP held its National Convention. This week, the Democratic Party will have its turn. And with the presidential campaign now in full gear, American politics --- and the two-party system at the heart of those politics --- is now, more or less, on just about everyone's mind.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Carter Phipps, the former executive editor of Enlighten-Next magazine, whose latest book is "Evolutionaries: Unlocking the Spiritual and Cultural Potential of Science's Greatest Idea." (Phipps will be reading from and signing copies of this book tonight, the 21st, at 6pm at the Barnes and Noble here in Tulsa at 41st and Yale.) Just about everyone knows the basics, so to speak, when it comes to evolution: the Darwinian theory, the debate vs. "Creationism," the idea of natural selection, etc.

On today's program, we listen back to a conversation from February of this year with Dr. Lenn Goodman, the Mellon Professor of Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. At that time, Dr. Goodman was preparing to give a talk here at TU entitled "Creation and Evolution." An award-winning scholar and prolific author, Dr. Goodman's philosophical interests have mainly been in metaphysics and ethics, with special attention to Islamic and Jewish philosophical thought and their creative interactions.

Our guest on ST is Gary Peluso-Verdend, President of Phillips Theological Seminary (or PTS) here in Tulsa. Established in 1907, PTS recently changed both its identity and mission statements.

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