race relations

On this edition of our program, we speak with Vanessa Finley, the newly appointed Chief Executive Officer at YWCA Tulsa. A Tulsa native, Booker T. Washington grad, and non-profit executive with 20+ years of experience, Finley has recently relocated to Tulsa from Kansas City; she began her tenure at YWCA Tulsa earlier this month.

Photo by Matt Herron

Fifty years ago, in 1964 -- during what would come to be called Freedom Summer in the American South -- a young photographer named Matt Herron, who'd recently relocated to Mississippi from the North (with his wife and kids) in order to work on civil rights issues while also shooting photo-stories for Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, put together a group of talented photographers that was known as the Southern Documentary Project.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation will present its 2014 National Symposium on Reconciliation in America on May 29th and 30th here in our city; the theme for this 5th annual symposium is "Education for Reconciliation." (You can learn more about this upcoming event here.) On today's installment of ST, we speak with the keynote speaker for that symposium, Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, who has been president of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. Dr.

Today on our program, an interesting chat with Anand Giridharadas, a columnist for The New York Times who's also the author of "India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking" (which the Financial Times called "a finely observed portrait of the modern nation"). Giridharadas joins us to talk about his new book, which is just out.

We are pleased to welcome Katherine S. Newman back to our show. She's the Dean of Arts and Sciences as well as a professor of sociology at the Johns Hopkins University, and she's also the author of several books on poverty, the working poor, and the consequences of inequality, including "The Accordion Family" and "The Missing Class." Newman speaks with us about her newest book, which she co-authored.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the TU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will mark its 25th anniversary with a symposium here on campus regarding the moral and ethical issues involved in human medical research. The event is entitled "Protecting Human Subjects from Harm: Traversing the Moral & Legal Boundaries of Biomedical Research" and is described in detail at this link. Our guest on ST is the scholar who'll give the keynote address at this event: Dr.

"Play ball!" Weather allowing, 26 of the 30 teams that comprise Major League Baseball will be taking the field today. There may have been two games last week in Australia between the Dodgers and Diamondbacks, and a game last night between the Dodgers and Padres, but MLB's Opening Day for 2014 is actually today --- Monday the 31st --- and to mark the beginning of the new season, we at ST are pleased to present (as is our custom) a baseball-driven interview.

Our guest on ST is Anne Hyde, the William R. Hochman Professor of History at Colorado College. She'll be giving the 2014 H.G. Barnard Distinguished Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, tonight (Tuesday the 25th) at the Gilcrease Museum Auditorium here in Tulsa. The lecture begins at the 7pm and is free to the public. Prof. Hyde, who mainly teaches courses on the history of Native America as well as that of North America, received her A.B. degree in American Studies from Mount Holyoke College and her M.A.

Today on StudioTulsa, we chat with the esteemed Tulsa-based author and longtime public-speaker and businessman Clifton Taulbert, whose many books include "Once Upon A Time When We Were Colored," "The Last Train North," and "Eight Habits of the Heart." Taulbert joins us to discuss his newest book, a memoir called "The Invitation," which is just out from New South Books.

Theatre Tulsa's New Stage initiative will soon offer its first-ever production with a widely hailed play from 2010 that has never before graced an Oklahoma stage: "Clybourne Park," by Bruce Norris, is a Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning comedy/drama that was written in response to Lorraine Hansberry's landmark play, "A Raisin in the Sun" (1959). "Clybourne Park" will be staged in the Liddy Doenges Theatre at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center from tomorrow night (Friday the 21st) through March 2nd.

On this edition of ST, an engaging discussion about race- and economic-based differences in America today --- and about how we as a nation ought to address these differences. Our guest is Peter Edelman, an attorney, policy maker, author, and Georgetown University law professor.

Over the past four decades, the efforts of the Cherokee Freedman to gain full tribal rights within the Cherokee Nation have, by turns, burned or simmered, so to speak; today, this issue is now being pushed back and forth in our federal court system. On this installment of ST, a review of such matters as we welcome back to our program Hannibal B. Johnson, a Tulsa-based author, attorney, and human-rights activist. Johnson tells us about his new book, "Apartheid in Indian Country?

The Best of ST in 2012: "Panther Baby"

Jan 2, 2013

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion from earlier this year with the author and activist Jamal Joseph. Joseph's autobiography, "Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention," is the focal point of our chat; it's an engrossing hybrid of coming-of-age candor, street-savvy wisdom, and recent socio-political history.

Last week, the nonprofit John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation released a survey of Tulsa residents' views on race relations. This survey was called for, and completed, before the recent (and perhaps racially motivated) shootings in North Tulsa in the pre-dawn hours of Good Friday --- but it's hardly surprising that, given the shocking tragedy of those violent acts and the coincidental appearance of this new survey, people throughout our community are speaking about issues of race with a candor that seems, in many cases, as rare as it is welcome.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Residents in a north Tulsa neighborhood are left with more doubts than hopes the crime-ridden area will improve after a shooting spree.

Authorities describe the shootings earlier this month as racially motivated. Three people were killed and two more wounded.

All of the victims were black.

The shootings happened not far from one of the nation's worst race riots more than 90 years ago, where as many as 300 blacks died. Some residents still consider this northeastern Oklahoma city of 391,000 divided.

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