race relations

On this edition of ST, an engaging discussion about race- and economic-based differences in America today --- and about how we as a nation ought to address these differences. Our guest is Peter Edelman, an attorney, policy maker, author, and Georgetown University law professor.

Over the past four decades, the efforts of the Cherokee Freedman to gain full tribal rights within the Cherokee Nation have, by turns, burned or simmered, so to speak; today, this issue is now being pushed back and forth in our federal court system. On this installment of ST, a review of such matters as we welcome back to our program Hannibal B. Johnson, a Tulsa-based author, attorney, and human-rights activist. Johnson tells us about his new book, "Apartheid in Indian Country?

The Best of ST in 2012: "Panther Baby"

Jan 2, 2013

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion from earlier this year with the author and activist Jamal Joseph. Joseph's autobiography, "Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention," is the focal point of our chat; it's an engrossing hybrid of coming-of-age candor, street-savvy wisdom, and recent socio-political history.

Last week, the nonprofit John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation released a survey of Tulsa residents' views on race relations. This survey was called for, and completed, before the recent (and perhaps racially motivated) shootings in North Tulsa in the pre-dawn hours of Good Friday --- but it's hardly surprising that, given the shocking tragedy of those violent acts and the coincidental appearance of this new survey, people throughout our community are speaking about issues of race with a candor that seems, in many cases, as rare as it is welcome.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Residents in a north Tulsa neighborhood are left with more doubts than hopes the crime-ridden area will improve after a shooting spree.

Authorities describe the shootings earlier this month as racially motivated. Three people were killed and two more wounded.

All of the victims were black.

The shootings happened not far from one of the nation's worst race riots more than 90 years ago, where as many as 300 blacks died. Some residents still consider this northeastern Oklahoma city of 391,000 divided.

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