Public Health

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. David Kendrick, CEO of the locally based nonprofit, MyHealth Access Network. This network, serving more than 2 million clients throughout Greater Tulsa, works to link health care providers and their patients in a digitally-driven data network aimed at improving the health of patients, reducing inefficiency and waste, and coordinating care more effectively. As Dr. Kendrick tells us today, MyHealth Access Network has recently received a $4.5 million federal grant to establish the Route 66 Accountable Health Community.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interesting discussion about water conservation and related subjects with Noah Roberts, the proprietor of a recently opened shop in downtown Tulsa called The Water Co. This business sells water-bottle filling stations as well as reusable bottles, cups, and straws. And it does so, as noted on its website, in order to "improve community health and habitat by providing drinking water systems and reusable drinkware as an alternative to single-serve plastic bottles and cups.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a systematic, wide-ranging, and newly released effort to improve the health of the people of Tulsa County (where more than 60 percent of the population is overweight or obese). Our guest is Bruce Dart, executive director of the Tulsa Health Department, who tells us about his organization's multi-faceted Community Health Improvement Plan (or CHIP).

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with Scott Phillips, a Tulsa-based entrepreneur and innovator -- and avid "hacker" -- who was recognized as a "Champion of Change" in a 2013 ceremony at The White House.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome back to our program Dr. Gerard Clancy, TU's Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the Oxley College of Health Sciences. (Dr. Clancy has also been designated as the next President of the University.) He joins us to talk about a newly announced effort aimed at addressing mental illness and substance abuse in the Tulsa area.

What do we mean by the phrase "public health"? What exactly does this term refer to? What sorts of treatments, goals, activities, and populations does it cover? On this edition of our program, we speak with Dr. Bruce Dart, who is Executive Director of the Tulsa City-County Health Department -- and who's also a Visiting Associate Professor at the OU-Tulsa College of Public Health. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting chat with Katie Plohocky, who is one of the founders of the locally based Healthy Community Store Initiative. This organization, as noted at its tulsarealgoodfood.org website, was formed "to address the food desert problem in Tulsa, Oklahoma....

(Note: This show originally aired back in January.) On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims to, per its website, "change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant.... Upstream USA's mission is to change contraceptive counseling and care in health centers so that clients have easy access to the best contraceptive methods.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims, as noted at its website, "to change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant." Indeed, as stated further at the Upstream USA site: "Fully half of all pregnancies in the United States are accidental.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about a non-profit called WellOK, which was formed in 2014, and which bills itself as "the Northeastern Oklahoma Business Coalition on Health." It's a coalition of 17 locally based organizations, including businesses large and small that purchase healthcare as well as government and philanthropic organizations.

On this edition of ST, an interesting exit interview with John W. Silva; the CEO of Morton Comprehensive Health Services here in Tulsa will leave this post next month to assume a similar job in his native Massachusetts. Silva has been at the helm of Morton since 2010. Under his leadership, it has expanded from its North Tulsa headquarters to additional locations in Bartlesville and west Tulsa and has moreover become Oklahoma's only community health center-based teaching facility.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Gerard Clancy back to our program. Earlier this year, Dr. Clancy was named Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of The University of Tulsa's soon-to-be-officially-opened College of Health Sciences; before joining TU, he was President of OU-Tulsa for eight years. A recognized expert on community health, psychiatry, health care policy, and the study of medicine, Dr. Clancy tells us about how this newly created college will operate.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Erik Vanderlip, who is the George Kaiser Foundation Chair in Mental Health and an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medical Informatics at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine at OU-Tulsa. Board certified in both Family Medicine and Psychiatry, Dr. Vanderlip also has a degree in public health and health services research, and he specializes in caring for medically and psychiatrically complex individuals.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett and City Councilors are seeking public input regarding how best to use a proposed renewal of the Vision 2025 sales tax for economic development here in our community. Several ideas have recently been put forth -- from funding for the Tulsa Zoo to enhancements to the Pearl District, from the purchase of the downtown Tulsa Club Building to refurbishment of the Gilcrease Museum and its buildings and grounds (to name but a few) -- and on this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn another such proposal.

On this edition of ST on Health, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian is our guest. He's widely considered one of the most influential voices in American health care when it comes to social technology and its relationship with medicine, and he'll be leading a free-to-the-public workshop this afternoon (Tuesday the 14th) at the Perkins Auditorium on the OU-Tulsa campus (at 41st and Yale). The workshop is called "The Public Health Provider." As Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Karen M. Masterson, a journalist turned malaria researcher, whose new book is "The Malaria Project: The U.S. Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure." It's a remarkable and sometimes unsettling story of science, medicine, and war -- at once illuminating and surprising, the book also explores the ethical perils of seeking treatments for disease while ignoring the human condition.

This edition of SToH presents an interesting discussion about the "food insecurity" affecting so many Native American individuals, families, and communities today, here in Oklahoma and all over the nation. Addressing this insecurity --- and the serious and widespread health issues stemming from it --- is no easy task, and we meet a locally based public-health researcher, filmmaker, activist, and advocate who's taking a deliberately multifaceted approach in doing so. Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we hear from two doctors who are both highly accomplished and longtime advocates of public health, which has been defined as (per Wikipedia) "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations public and private, communities, and individuals." The health of a given culture or society, in other words, rather than any one individual's health or well-being.